Recent Submissions

  • NIOMR Newsletter, Jan-Jun 2010.

    Nigerian Institute for Oceanography and Marine Research (Nigerian Institute for Oceanography and Marine ResearchLagos, Nigeria, 2010)
  • NIOMR Newsletter, Jan-Jun 2012.

    Nigerian Institute for Oceanography and Marine Research (Nigerian Institute for Oceanography and Marine ResearchLagos, Nigeria, 2012)
  • NIOMR Newsletter, Jan-Apr 2009.

    Nigerian Institute for Oceanography and Marine Research (Nigerian Institute for Oceanography and Marine ResearchLagos, Nigeria,, 2009)
  • NIOMR Newsletter, May-Oct 2009.

    Nigerian Institute for Oceanography and Marine Research (Nigerian Institute for Oceanography and Marine Research,Lagos, Nigeria,, 2009)
  • Pilot project on community Aquaculture development in Nigeria

    Nigerian Institute for Oceanography and Marine Research (NIOMRLagos (Nigeria), 2010)
  • Development of turtle excluder device(TED) and its adoption in Nigeria.

    Solarin, B.B.; Ayinla, O.A.; Williams, A.B.; Adeogun, O.A.; Bolaji, D.A.; Yarhere, M.T. (NIOMRLagos (Nigeria), 2011)
  • Compendium of oyster culture in Nigeria

    Ayinla, O.A.; Ansa, E.J.; Edun, O.M.; Bekibele, D.O.; Ogori, K.T. (NIOMRLagos (Nigeria), 2011)
  • Quality assurance, safety and standardisation of value added fisheries products

    Akande, G.R.; Ayinla, O.A.; Olusola A.O.; Adeyemi, R.S.; Oramadike, C.E.; Babalola, A.F. et al (NIOMRLagos (Nigeria), 2012)
  • Blueprint for canned fish products

    Akande, G.R.; Ayinla, O.A.; Adeyemi, R.S.; Olusola A.O.; Salaudeen, M.M. (Nigerian Institute for Oceanography and Marine ResearchLagos, Nigeria, 2012)
  • Blue print for smoked fish products

    Akande, G.R.; Ayinla, O.A.; Adeyemi, R.S.; Olusola A.O.; Salaudeen, M.M. (NIOMRLagos (Nigeria), 2012)
  • Concrete fish ponds construction

    Yarhere, M. (NIOMRLagos, Nigeria, 2009)
  • Construction of earthen ponds.

    Yarhere, M. (Nigerian Institute of Oceanography and Marine ResearchLagos, Nigeria, 2009)
  • Technical Publication of Nigerian Institute for Oceanography and Marine Research (NIOMR) Lagos Nigeria, Volume 1, November 2008.

    Nigerian Institute for Oceanography and Marine Research (Nigerian Institute for Oceanography and Marine ResearchLagos, Nigeria, 2008)
    The Nigerian Institute for Oceanography and Marine Research (NIOMR) established in November 1975 by the Research Institute Establishment Order of 1975 has the responsibilities to conduct research into the resources and geological/geophysical, chemical and physical characteristics of the Nigerian territorial waters and the high seas. NIOMR also conducts research to fish utilization as well as Extension and Liaison Services. Since the establishment of NIOMR, a total of 35 occasional papers and 109 technical papers had been published to expose the research findings of the Institute to various stakeholders. These technical papers were previously published as standalone papers. In order to improve the quality, publication and circulation of scientific information from the Institute NIOMR’s Technical Committee was set up in June 2007. I am happy to note that the new Technical Publication Committee has coordinated the publication of this new NIOMR Technical Paper Series as volumes. Each Volume which may consist of 5 or more papers will be subsequently published on a half yearly basis. The papers in this new series have been critically peer reviewed both internally and by external scientists. I hope that with the release of this maiden technical paper series, NIOMR scientists will seize the opportunity to make their research findings available to the scientific community, educational, government and private stakeholders. It is my believe that this publication and subsequent editions, will further extend the frontiers of knowledge and contribute to the body of scientific information needed for the socio-economic development and sustainable management of Nigeria’s marine coastal environment and resources.
  • Prospects of fish smoking venture in the middle belt area of Nigeria.

    Akande, G.R.; Tobor, J.G. (Nigerian Institute of Oceanography and Marine ResearchLagos, Nigeria, 1993)
    This paper discusses fish smoking in general with particular reference to the Middle Belt Area and also briefly summarises the fisheries of the area. Factors influencing the form in which fish is disposed are discussed and investment opportunities of fish smoking on a small scale examined.
  • A review of 1973 - 1982 Tuna fishing activities within Nigeria's Eez and the options for Nigeria.

    Ajayi, T.O. (Nigerian Institute of Oceanography and Marine ResearchLagos, Nigeria, 1984)
    Examination of published information on temperature, oxygen and other enviromental prefrences of tuna like fishes suggests that the Nigerian EEz should have commercial quantities of fishes. ICCAT historical catch and effort data analysed are confirmatory. given the prevailing low level of maintenance conciousness, initial investmnt and skills required, purse-seine may not be decidedly superior to pole ond line as capture technique. Prefered size of vessel type and gear specific scenarios are described. It appears that fuel costs can attract some of the multinational fleets to Nigeria and that transhipment facilities and a local canery are advantageous.
  • Marine biodiversity in Nigeria – the known and the unknown. National report.

    Isebor, Catherine E. (Nigerian Institute for Oceanography and Marine ResearchLagos, Nigeria, 2004)
    Nigeria has a coastline of 853 km, a maritime area of 46,500 km2 and an exclusive economic zone of 210,900 km2. The Nigerian coastal area is hot and humid, with an annual temperature range between 26 and 34oC, and the highest temperatures occurring during the dry season (November to March). The total annual rainfall averages between 350 and 600 centimeters. More than 80 percent of the rain falls during the rainy season (April to October) when tropical storm conditions are frequent. Rainfall is usually heavy and occasionally lasts for over 24 hours. Rainfall of about 50mm/hour between July and August are common and results in flash floods. The predominant wind is the rain bearing southwest trade wind from the Atlantic Ocean. During the short dry period, the dust laden north east dry wind from the Sahara desert reaches the coastal areas, producing hazy conditions (Ibe et al. 1985). The Nigerian intertidal mangrove swamps cover an area of about 5,590 square kilometres (Allen 1965). The swamps are separated from the sea by barrier-bar islands that are usually broken by tidal channels. The Niger delta area, which has a flourishing mangrove ecosystem, was formed by long and continuous interactions of sediment laden Niger River water and coastal processes, creating beach-ridges, barrier islands, a fresh water floodplain and brackish mangrove swamp. This coastal habitat is interrupted by a series of estuaries, lagoons and embayments. The total brackish water habitat is estimated as 12,900 km2. The mangroves, wetlands and inter-tidal systems occur in saline soil subject to tidal inundation and occupy a total area of almost 1 million hectares (Okigbo 1984, FAO 1981). Fishing is the main occupation of the coastal communities, with various types of gears being employed. Fishing is conducted in creeks, rivers, estuaries, mudflats, near-shore and offshore. Commercial fishing supports about 440 trawlers, with about three quarters of the fleet targeting the shrimp resources. The mangrove plants and associated halophytic plants are used for building, extraction of tannin; construction works, curing of fish, and other fishing implements. Mineral resources in the coastal and marine waters include petroleum, with an oil reserve of about 21 billion barrels and gas reserve estimated at more than 11 trillion cubic feet. Current production levels are at about 1.9 million barrels of crude oil and 200,000 barrels of gas condensate per day. The current natural gas production is 3,400 million cubic feet per day in the form of associated gas, of which about 340 million is marketed in the domestic market, 340 million re-injected and 2,720 million cubic feet is flared daily. Sand and gravel are exploited onshore and offshore, in the riverbed, lagoons, estuaries and beaches. Millions of cubic meters of sand are dredged annually during oil exploration and exploitation, as well as for the construction industry. Most of the sand mined is used for reclamation of swampy areas, in the block-making industry and construction work.