Recent Submissions

  • Nigerian Institute for Oceanography and Marine Research Annual Report, 1985.

    Nigerian Institute for Oceanography and Marine Research (Nigerian Institute for Oceanography and Marine ResearchLagos, Nigeria, 1985)
  • Nigerian Institute for Oceanography and Marine Research Annual Report, 2009.

    Nigerian Institute for Oceanography and Marine Research (Nigerian Institute for Oceanography and Marine ResearchLagos, Nigeria, 2009)
  • Nigerian Institute for Oceanography and Marine Research Annual Report 2008

    Nigerian Institute for Oceanography and Marine Research (NIOMRLagos Nigeria, 2008)
  • Nigerian Institute for Oceanography and Marine Research Annual Report, 2011.

    Nigerian Institute for Oceanography and Marine Research (Nigerian Institute for Oceanography and Marine ResearchLagos, Nigeria, 2011)
  • Nigerian Institute for Oceanography and Marine Research Annual Report, 2010.

    Nigerian Institute for Oceanography and Marine Research (Nigerian Institute for Oceanography and Marine ResearchLagos, Nigeria, 2010)
  • NIOMR in brief.

    Nigerian Institute for Oceanography and Marine Research (Nigerian Institute for Oceanography and Marine ResearchLagos, Nigeria, 2009)
    A general description of the on going research work going on in the various departments in Nigerian Institute for Oceanography and Marine Research (NIOMR)
  • Nigerian Institute for Oceanography and Marine Research Annual Report, 1999.

    Ajayi, T.O. (Nigerian Institute of Oceanography and Marine ResearchLagos, Nigeria, 1999)
    The Institute succeeded in realising part of its long-term plan of extending its research activities to cover the entire coastline of Nigeria, with the opening of Sapele Rural Station in Delta State. The station had since commenced operation prioritising farmers' field test and incubation of NIOMR's validated research results and technologies An attempt was made to revitalise the work force through staff upgrading, promotions, confirmation of appointments and retirement from the service. I n all 103 officers in various cadres were affected. New postings were also effected during the year for more effectiveness.All-year-round statistical sampling of landings in the industrial fishing sector continued throughout 1999. Croakers, as usual, dominated the fish trawls being, the most abundant commercial species in inshore waters, accounting for 84.14 % of landings. Size statistics during the year showed definite pressure on inshore fisheries resources. This calls for long term management for sustainability.Preliminary analyses of the trawl survey of the Gulf of Guinea conducted during the year indicated that while bigeye (Brachydeuterus auritus) occurred in varying quantities in the entire gulf region, certain other species were location specific.In response to the US ban on Nigeria's shrimp exports to protect turtles which are on the endangered species list, but are caught incidental to shrimping, NIOMR researched and developed the Turtle Excluder Devices (TED) much earlier on, thereby persuading US authorities to un-proscribe Nigeria. In 1999, NIOMR hosted on behalf of the Federal Department of Fisheries, the FAO/GEF Workshop on Trawl Shrimp Fishery Big-catch Reduction Workshop for the African Region.Drawing participants from Cameroon, Tanzania, Gambia, Ghana, Seychelles, Mauritius and Senegal among others, the workshop prepared project proposals for large scale fishing under the Global Environmental Fund (GEF) to address trawl shrimp fishery by Catch.Significant progress was made in integrated aquaculture practices at the out- station Badore confirming the economic viability of fish-cum vegetables (Ugu) propagation. Projections from field practice suggest that one hectare of farmland can generate as much as N400, 000.00 gross revenue per annum from just Ugu alone.In view of the commercial importance of fish culture in Nigeria, efforts were made during the year to isolate highly productive strains of catfish Clarias garieQinus bio-technically, for development into base broodstocks. In the meantime, infrastructures and logistics were put in place for the institutionalisationof the packaged 12-week intensive aquaculture training programme conceptualised entirely at NIOMR for fish farm entrepreneurs' capacity building. Hopefully funding will improve in year 2000 so that appropriate attention can be devoted to Aquaculture, which clearly holds the key to self-sufficiency in fish production.Poor mass dissemination and extension of farm technologies was identified as a bottleneck to the rapid development of the Nigerian agriculture. NIOMR fielded a Fisheries Extension Technologies Workshop in 1999 to firm up the strategies for a viable and effective Fisheries Extension Framework in Nigeria.Although the Chemical and Physical Oceanography programme was handicapped by the non-serviceability of Research Vessel "SARKIN BAKA" previous data collections were analysed for military application. NIOMR continued to participate in International workshops and discourses on these matters. NIOMR was elected a Vice-Chairman for the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC of UNESCO) with responsibility for capacity building.NIOMR was nominated member of an Inter-Ministerial Committee on the permanent Solution to the Bar-Beach Erosion Problem. In addition the Geology/Geo-physics Division of NIOMR was involved in the CSI (UNESCO) specially funded project on the runoff drainage systems of Victoria and Ikoyi Islands in Lagos.The main tool for oceanographic research work, the "SARKIN BAKA" awaited more funds in 1999 to get into the final phase of its NIOMR concretised its out reach programmes in 1999 and work on NIOMR/Shell Petroleum Development Company really took off in November 1999. Earlier in the year, SPDC started negotiations on another collaboration with NIOMR on their Forcados Integrated Plant project. NIOMR opened up communications with the Bayelsa State Government on the introduction of NIOMR's Fish Drying Equipment to the State. In 1999, NIOMR vigorously invested in computerisation and added a total of 24 desk tops to the stock and arrangement for internet conclusively were far advanced. Staff training and retraining were areas of high priority refurbishment.NIOMR concretised its out reach programmes in 1999 and work on NIOMR/Shell Petroleum Development Company really took off in November 1999. Earlier in the year, SPDC started negotiations on another collaboration with NIOMR on their Forcados Integrated Plant project. NIOMR opened up communications with the Bayelsa State Government on the introduction of NIOMR's Fish Drying Equipment to the State. In 1999, NIOMR vigorously invested in computerisation and added a total of 24 desk tops to the stock and arrangement for internet conclusively were far advanced. Staff training and retraining were areas of high priority.Towards infrastructure development, the net-Ioft built by the Japanese government was transformed by direct labour to a reception hall. Procurement of plastic chairs will complete the up grade systems.It is hoped that year 2000 funding levels will improve tremendously, commensurate with the challenges at hand. T. 0. AJAYI (Ph.D.) DIRECTOR
  • Nigerian Institute for Oceanography and Marine Research Annual Report, 1997.

    Ajayi, T.O. (Nigerian Institute for Oceanography and Marine ResearchLagos, Nigeria, 1997)
    Few publications on the Fisheries of Nigeria focus on the non-penaeid decapod stocks, and in general, reports discussing artisanal coastal and estuarine shrimp landings have been based largely on ad-hoc observations. Presumably as a consequence, only the big penaeid Penaeus notialis and Parapenaeopsis atlantica are identified, and that, only occasionally. More often than not, artisanal crustacean catches are usually lumped together as if they consist of a single taxon and treated under such group name as Caridae. The exception is that of Scott (1966) who estimated 1125 tons as the annual landings of filter traps fishing in the Bonny River to Forcados area, about 40kg per man per day. Tracing the abundance of white shrimp Nematopalaemon hastatus, Marioghae (1980) recorded catch per trip for filter traps ‘Iseke’ and Stow nets ‘Nkoto’ as 1.25 and 6.67 kg respectively. Enin et al (1989) examined shrimp seasonality in the stow net Nkoto trap fishery in Cross River Estuary. But seasonal abundance patterns observed have not also been entirely straightforward and consistent. Lefevere (1970) and Sagua (1980) all recorded abundant catches during the rainy season, while Marioghae 1980 and Enin et al (1989) narrow peak catch rates to the early and late rains, and poor harvest in between. And while Marioghae (1980) reported a fishery predicated on neap tides in the estuary spring tide, catches were superior on the continental shelf according to Enin et al (1989). These seeming inconsistencies justify current re-assessment of shrimp landing patterns and potentials vis-à-vis the ecological circumstances on the Nigerian coast. Situated between latitudes 7o 32’ and 7o 34’, the Imo River mouth has good shrimp fisheries both in the estuary and the near shore zone, and some field stations facilities. Flanked on both shores is the accidentally introduced Indo-West Pacific palms Nypa fructicans which has completed the indigenous flora. Several fishing settlements on both the eastern and the western border flanks are devoted to shrimping which are dominated by Andoni and the Ibibio fishermen. T. O. Ajayi Director
  • Nigerian Institute for Oceanography and Marine Research Annual Report, 1996.

    Akpati, B.N. (Nigerian Institute for Oceanography and Marine ResearchLagos, Nigeria, 1996)
    The first phase of a coastal fisheries survey initiated in 1991, with the assistance of the World Bank, was completed in March 1996. The survey found that several inherent parameters are critical to all the main fisheries and these factors severally affect fishing operations. These critical factors include currents as they moderate fish movements and behaviour, lunar cycle, seasonal disruptions, inappropriate improvisation, coastal perturbations, scarcity of fuel wood, menace by trawlers, piracy and increasing costs. Appropriate policies and strategies to redress these critical factors and other disincentives should contribute to evitalising and sustaining small-scale coastal and marine fisheries in Nigeria. The relocation of the institute’s fish farm to a new 20ha site at Ijoyi/Badore recorded remarkable progress in terms of basic infrastructure developed during the year. These included completion of laboratory and office blocks, seven concrete tanks and six earthen ponds, and a borehole among others. The Fish Technology programme investigated the use of chemical and non-chemical insecticides for reducing post-harvest losses in coastal fisheries. Actellic 50 and vegetable oil were tested and found to be effective against attack by moulds and insects when compared against controls. Research also indicated the potency of ginger and garlic for protection of fish cakes produced from minced under-utilized fish species especially in terms of total microbial load. The Marine Geology/Geophysics programme had to be limited to shoreline processes constrained by research vessel non sea-worthiness. Beach profiling and collection of littoral observation data along the Bar-beach in Lagos continued for the first half of the year. This was discontinued as a result of beach sand nourishment initiated by the Federal Ministry of Works and housing. However, data collection proceeded monthly for monitoring the effectiveness of the T-Type groin constructed at the beach front to protect the Federal College of Fisheries and Marine Technology. Within the year, our International linkage under the TOGA/World Ocean Climate Experiment route AX14-Lagos-Brazil using a Voluntary observing ship (VOS) Clipper SAO LOUIS made regular transects across the South Atlantic and transmitted valuable meteorological and oceanographic data sets. The Physical and Chemical Oceanography programme in collaboration with the Statistics and Economics division initiated a data collection system for the establishment of a national fisheries and oceanographic data bank for information management. The data centre will act as a depository for national marine fisheries and oceanographic information indispensable for scientific research, industrial and technological development, planning and decision-making in marine science. It is also hoped that this could serve as the nucleus of a National Ocean Data Service. Library services improved remarkably during the year with subscription to seventy three (73) international journal titles/periodicals financed by the National Agricultural Research Project (NARP). Capacity building also included the acquisition of a computer and accessories to facilitate bibliographical search and periodic accession listings. The Technical support services, within limits of available funding, maintained and operated the physical assets of the Institute. The completion of an additional shallow borehole in August further ensured water supply to the laboratories and office blocks. It is expected that rehabilitation of transportation and communication facilities during the year will translate into increased overall productivity. DIRECTOR
  • Nigerian Institute for Oceanography and Marine Research Annual Report, 1995.

    Tobor, J.G. (Nigeria Institute for Oceanography and Marine ResearchLagos, Nigeria, 1995)
    During the year under review, attention was focussed on the survey of white shrimp fishery and its mechanisation status in Nigeria. Survey results indicate that at sea, the crayfish beam trawl fishery is all year round, but rough from July to September. Catches are therefore better from October and best between December and June. However, where rains are heavy and early, stow net shrimp fishery at sea is best from January to March. Within the year a series of violent Swells/sourges devastate the Victoria Island beach in Lagos. The preliminary survey of the Institute showed that nourished beach is slightly above the level of the Ahmadu Bellow way. The present low nature of the beach was not adequate enough to absorb the shock impounded by the swell, hence the resultant flooding. The study of the shallow surface geology of the Nigerian Continental Shelf is an important project of the Institute. It is expected that the information available will constitute part of the data to be used in the delineation of Nigerian continental shelf. In chemical oceanography, ecotoxicological studies on heavy metals sow the levels of heavy metals in the biotic and physical compartments of the Lagos lagoon environment, their relative toxicity and the relative susceptibility of some lagoon animals to heavy metal stress. Also, work on the establishment of an oceanographic data bank for the provision of valuable information for marine navigation, transportation, fishing activities and marine engineering was carried out. Efforts were made to investigate the fish feed ingredient, available in the country with a view to formulating least cost and location specific diets for aquaculture developments. Diagnostic survey of locally available feeding stuffs and their suitability as fish feed ingredient were examined. It is hoped that the analysed results will form a working document for the formulation and compounding of appropriate fish feed for aquaculture in the country. A gradual and steady relocation of the Ikoyi Fish Farm to Badore in Eti-osa Local Government Area of Lagos State started in earnest. The perimeter survey of the land was completed and a 10 ha portion cleared ready for the establishment of basic infrastructures. Although funds were limited in the year, remarkable progress was recorded in most of the projects undertaken by the Institute, particularly those funded under the National Agricultural Research Programme (NARP). J. G. Tobor Director
  • NIOMR in brief

    NIOMR Lagos (NIOMR, 1995)
    A brief history of the achievements of (NIOMR) Nigerian Institute for Oceanography and Marine Research from 1975 to 1995. The mandate and reason for the establishment of the institute in 1975 inclucive.