Recent Submissions

  • Seychelles tuna bulletin: Year 2011

    Seychelles Fishing Authority (Seychelles Fishing AuthorityVictoria (Seychelles), 2012)
    Data used to generate the tables and figures presented here are based on daily catch and effort forms (logbooks) returned from fishing vessels that are licensed to fish in the Seychelles EEZ and for purse seiners, as well as from data collected via the tuna sampling programme conducted during transshipment in Port Victoria. Sometimes there are delays in these being received at SFA, especially for longliners that often spend up to a year at sea, and for purse seiners the delays are usually during and just after the second quarter of the year when most vessels are fishing in the Mozambique Channel and are not necessarily using Port Victoria for transshipment. Readers should note that many of the figures presented for longline fishing vessel are subject to revision (usually upwards) as more data become available. The closing date for compilation of data prior to the generation of the statistical tables is shown at the head of each table.
  • Seychelles tuna bulletin: Year 2010

    Seychelles Fishing Authority (Seychelles Fishing AuthorityVictoria (Seychelles), 2011)
    Data used to generate the tables and figures presented here are based on daily catch and effort forms (logbooks) returned from fishing vessels that are licensed to fish in the Seychelles EEZ and for purse seiners, as well as from data collected via the tuna sampling programme conducted during transshipment in Port Victoria. Sometimes there are delays in these being received at SFA, especially for longliners that often spend up to a year at sea, and for purse seiners the delays are usually during and just after the second quarter of the year when most vessels are fishing in the Mozambique Channel and are not necessarily using Port Victoria for transshipment.
  • Seychelles tuna bulletin: Year 2009

    Seychelles Fishing Authority (Seychelles Fishing AuthorityVictoria (Seychelles), 2010)
    Data used to generate the tables and figures presented here are based on daily catch and effort forms (logbooks) returned from fishing vessels that are licensed to fish in the Seychelles EEZ and for purse seiners, as well as from data collected via the tuna sampling programme conducted during transshipment in Port Victoria. Sometimes there are delays in these being received at SFA, especially for longliners that often spend up to a year at sea, and for purse seiners the delays are usually during and just after the second quarter of the year when most vessels are fishing in the Mozambique Channel and are not necessarily using Port Victoria for transshipment.
  • Seychelles tuna bulletin: Year 2008

    Seychelles Fishing Authority (Seychelles Fishing AuthorityVictoria (Seychelles), 2009)
    Data used to generate the tables and figures presented here are based on daily catch and effort forms (logbooks) returned from fishing vessels that are licensed to fish in the Seychelles EEZ and for purse seiners, as well as from data collected via the tuna sampling programme conducted during transshipment in Port Victoria. Sometimes there are delays in these being received at SFA, especially for longliners that often spend up to a year at sea, and for purse seiners the delays are usually during and just after the second quarter of the year when most vessels are fishing in the Mozambique Channel and are not necessarily using Port Victoria for transshipment.
  • Seychelles tuna bulletin: Year 2007

    Seychelles Fishing Authority (Seychelles Fishing AuthorityVictoria (Seychelles), 2009)
    Data used to generate the tables and figures presented here are based on daily catch and effort forms (logbooks) returned from fishing vessels that are licensed to fish in the Seychelles EEZ and for purse seiners, as well as from data collected via the tuna sampling programme conducted during transshipment in Port Victoria. Sometimes there are delays in these being received at SFA, especially for longliners that often spend up to a year at sea, and for purse seiners the delays are usually during and just after the second quarter of the year when most vessels are fishing in the Mozambique Channel and are not necessarily using Port Victoria for transshipment.
  • Seychelles tuna bulletin: Year 2006

    Seychelles Fishing Authority (Seychelles Fishing AuthorityVictoria (Seychelles), 2007)
    Data used to generate the tables and figures presented here are based on daily catch and effort forms (logbooks) returned from fishing vessels that are licensed to fish in the Seychelles EEZ and for purse seiners, as well as from data collected via the tuna sampling programme conducted during transshipment in Port Victoria. Sometimes there are delays in these being received at SFA, especially for longliners that often spend up to a year at sea, and for purse seiners the delays are usually during and just after the second quarter of the year when most vessels are fishing in the Mozambique Channel and are not necessarily using Port Victoria for transshipment.
  • Seychelles tuna bulletin : third quarter 1995

    Seychelles Fishing Authority (1995)
    Data used to generate the tables and figures presented here are based on daily catch and effort forms (‘logbooks') returned from fishing vessels which are licensed to fish in the Seychelles EEZ. Sometimes there is a delay in these being received at SFA, especially during and just after the second quarter of the year when most vessels are fishing in the Mozambique Channel. Readers should be aware that many of the figures presented here (especially the most recent) are subject to revision (usually upwards) as ore data become available. The date upon which the SFA database was closed prior the generation of the statistical tables is shown at the head of each table. Purse seiners Principal Points - The revised total purse seine tuna catch for the Western Indian Ocean in 1994 is now 279,883 t. This is the highest catch reported since records began. The previous highest recorded catch was 278,218 t in 1992. However, while the 1992 catch was the product of an average of 53 vessels licensed per month at an annual CPUE of 20.27 t/day, the 1994 catch was the result of an average of 50 vessels licensed per month at an annual CPUE of 22.27 t/day. - Some 12,569 days were fished in 1994 compared to 14,368 in the whole of 1993. The decrease was chiefly due to the lack of Japanese effort in the fishery: decreasing from 2,029 days in 1993 to only 19 days in 1994. Despite a 13% decrease in total effort the catch increased by 1% and resulted in a rise in CPUE from 19.27t/day in 1993 to 22.27 t/day in 1994. - The cumulative catch by the 30` of September 1995 was 207,347 t compared to 202,277 t by the same date in 1994. Not all logbooks for the period have yet been received. - The catch within the third quarter of 1995 was 75,160 t. This comprised 27,249 t (36%) yellow fin (Thunnus albacares) and 36,504 t (49%) skipjack (Katsuwonus pelamis). The remaining 11, 407 t (15%) was mainly big eye (Thunnus obesus) and albacore (Thunnus alalunga). This compares with the catch within the third quarter of 1994 when some 12,874 t (19%) of yellow fin was caught, together with 4, 4, 803 t (67%) of skipjack and 9,388 t (14%) of big eye and albacore. - Readers should be well aware that the catch compositions given here are NOT based on scientific sampling but on the assessment of the fishermen who write the daily catch and effort reports and who decide into which group fish should be placed. They may be biased. - Within the third quarter of 1995 2,983 days were fished compared to 3,346 days in the equivalent quarter of last year. This is a decrease in effort of almost 11%. - The CPUE within the third quarter of 1995 was 25.20 t/day compared to 20.04 t/day in the equivalent quarter of last year. - It should be well noted that the figures in Table 3 (Purse seiner transshipment statistics by harbour of transshipment) represent the transshipments of vessels whose trips ENDED in the month indicated and NOT the actual month of physical transshipment of the catch. - Transshipments through Victoria amounted to 56,473 t in the third quarter. This is an increase of almost 24 % compared to 45,684 t in the third quarter of 1994. No transshipments figures have been received yet for Antsiranana - This quarter most the purse seine fishing activities has been concentrated between Seychelles and Kenya/Tanzania; that is a more southern area than the usual fishing grounds located in the Somali basin at this period during the past years. Longliners Since the Tuna Bulletin for the first quarter of 1995 was produced we have received very few daily catch effort records forms for 1995 (8 logbooks by September 7th). This underlines the very slow reporting rate of longliners in general. Readers should be aware that these statistics represent only a small proportion of longliner activity the WIO because: - Not all longliners fishing in the WIO have a license to fish in the Seychelles EEZ and are therefore under no legal obligation to report to SFA; - Not all those with a Seychelles license provide daily catch and effort logbooks; - Some distant water fishing nations (DWFN) provide SFA with daily catch and effort forms covering their activity in the whole Indian Ocean while others confine their reports to the Seychelles EEZ. Principal points are: - Longliner activity is concentrated at the beginning or end of the year (first and last quarter) with little or no fishing from May to August; - Catch rates appear to decrease as effort increases and increase as effort decreases (see graphs); The reported catch so far in 1995 (data are available for Japan and Taiwan covering January and February only) is 141 t at a catch rate of 0.379 t/1000 hooks. This compares to the first two months of 1994 when 1,285 t were reported caught at a mean catch rate of 0.321t /1000 hooks. The total catch figures are expected to increase as more logbooks come in to SFA. Maps 3 and 4 show the areas from which longline fishing was reported in 1994 and the FIRST quarter of 1995 (Two months only). The reported catch per 1° square are small, they do not show up well on the map, therefore, effort has been used as a better indicator of areas of fishing activity. The graphics provide a summary of the SFA long line database covering the last ten years. The last twenty seven months are covered in detail so that it is possible to compare the quarter being reported on with the similar quarters of the two previous years and detect seasonal fishing patterns.
  • Seychelles tuna bulletin : third quarter 1987

    Seychelles Fishing Authority (1987)
    The number of purse seiners active in the Western Indian Ocean during the third quarter of 1987 increased from 30 vessels in June to 39 in September. This figure compares favorably to that of September of the previous year, when 34 vessels were in operation. Catch rates this year improved from the first and second quarters as expected, reaching an all time average high of 24 MT/day for the third quarter. During January and February, the proportion of yellow fin in the catch was high, falling sharply from April to May as vessels moved south to fish around the Mozambique Channel. In June, one month earlier than last year, the proportion of yellow fin in the catch increased to 75% as the fleet started to move to the north of the Seychelles EEZ but dropped to 27% in August-September. Skipjack became the dominant species this quarter, comprising 72% of the catch during August and September, similar to the trend set last year. The total catch by purse seiners in the Western Indian Ocean up to the third quarter of 1987 has been estimated at 100,840 tones. Statistics for the third quarter 1987 are still incomplete with 23 vessels out of 39 having submitted catch returns for September.
  • Seychelles tuna bulletin : first quarter 1995

    Seychelles Fishing Authority (1995)
    Data used to generate the tables and figures presented here are based on daily catch and effort report forms (1ogs') returned from the fishing vessels which are licensed to fish in the Seychelles EEZ. Sometimes there is a delay in these being received at SFA, especially after the second quarter of the year when most vessels are fishing in the Mozambique Channel. Readers should be aware that many of the figures presented here are subject to revision (usually upwards) as more data become available. The date upon which the SFA database was closed prior to the generation of the statistical tables is now shown at the head of each table. Principal Points Purse seiners - The revised total catch for the Western Indian Ocean for 1994 is now 272,192 t. This is the third year in succession that it has exceeded 270,000 t. - Some 12,196 days were fished in 1994 compared to 14,368 in the whole of 1993. The decrease was chiefly due to lack of Japanese effort in the fishery; decreasing from 2,029 days in 1993 to only 19 days in 1994. The mean CPUE rose from 19.27 t/day in 1993 to 22.32 t/day in 1994. Yellowfin (Thunnus albacares) comprised some 34% of the catch (91,865 t) and skipjack (Katsuwonus pelamis) some 55% (149,362 t). - The catch in the first quarter of 1995 is so far reported at 64,751 t; this compares with 75,847 t in the first quarter of 1994. - The catch in the first quarter of 1995 comprised 19,549 t (30%) yellow fin (Thunnus albacares) and 35,207 t (54 %) skipjack (Katsuwonus pelamis). In the first quarter of 1994 yellowfin comprised 48,943 t (65%) and skipjack 20,393 t (27%). - Readers should be well aware that the catch compositions given here are NOT based on scientific sampling but on the assessment of the fishermen who write the daily catch-effort reports and who decide into which group fish should be placed. They may therefore be biased. - In the first quarter of 1995 some 3,308 days have been fished compared to 2,846 days in the first quarter of 1994. - The CPUE in the first quarter of 1995 is 19.57 t/day compared to 26.65 t) day in the first quarter of 1994. - It should be noted that the figures in table 3 represent the transshipments of vessels who's trips ENDED in the month indicated and NOT the actual month of physical transshipment of the catch. - Reference to the map of purse seine fishing by one degree squares shows that there was virtually no fishing activity in the Chagos area in the first quarter of 1995. This contrasts with the intense activity which took place there during the first quarter of 1994. An oceanographer familiar with the area has suggested that a rise in water temperature may have caused a change in annual migration patterns. Probably as a consequence of the lack of fishing in the Chagos area there was more activity in the most Westerly W10 than usual in the first quarter. - Transshipment through Victoria was 46,207 t for the first quarter of 1995 compared with 47,809 t in the first quarter of 1994. Transshipment through Antsiranana is so far reported at 10,874 t in the first quarter of 1995 compared to 30,334 t in the equivalent quarter last year. This figure is based on logbooks which we have so far received. However, the Association Thoniere in their Note Trimestrielle for the first quarter of 1995 indicate that by the end of the quarter 16,797 t had been transshipped at Antsiranana. Maps 1 and 2 show the geographic areas of the W10 from which the purse seine catch came from in the whole of 1994 and the quarter of 1995 being reported on. The area of the circles plotted in each one degree square is proportional to the catch in that square. Interested readers are referred to previous bulletins in order to see the seasonal shift in areas of fishing activity. Data in the one degree squares (3,600 square nautical miles of ocean) include all nations reporting catches in the area during the described period. Long liners Since the Tuna Bulletin for the last quarter of 1994 was produced we have received more long line daily catch effort report forms for 1994. Data from these have been used to update the tables, maps and graphics. Virtually no data have yet been received for 1995. This underlines the very slow reporting rate of long liners in general. Readers should be aware that these statistics represent only a small proportion of long liner activity in the WIO because: (a) Not all long liners fishing in the WIO have a license to fish in the Seychelles EEZ and are therefore under no legal obligation to report to SFA. (b) Not all those with a Seychelles license provided daily log sheets. This could be due to non-fishing or fishing but not reporting. (c) Some distant water fishing nations (DWFN) provide SFA with daily catch and effort forms covering their activity in the whole Indian Ocean while others confine their reports to the Seychelles EEZ. Principle points are: - Longliner activity is concentrated at the beginning or end of the year (first and last quarter) with little or no fishing from May to August. - Catch rates appear to decrease as effort increases and increase as effort decreases; - The catch and CPUE in 1994 both show a decrease relative to 1993 (catch down from 3,913 t to 2,825 t and CPUE down from 0.394 t/1000 hooks to 0.318 t/1000 hooks). Maps 3 and 4 show the areas from which long line fishing was reported in 1993 and 1994. Because the reported catches per one degree square are small they do not show up well on the map; effort has therefore been used as a better indicator of area of fishing activity. The graphics provide a summary of the SFA long line database covering the last ten years. The last twenty seven months are covered in detail so that it is possible to compare the quarter being reported on with two past equivalent quarters and detect seasonal fishing patterns.
  • Seychelles tuna bulletin: first semester 2002

    Seychelles Fishing Authority (2002)
    Data used to generate the tables and figures presented here are based on daily catch and effort forms (logbooks) returned from fishing vessels that are licensed to fish in the Seychelles EEZ. Sometimes there is a delay in these being received at SFA, especially during and just after the second quarter of the year when most vessels are fishing in the Mozambique Channel. Readers should be aware that many of the figures presented here (especially the most recent) are subject to revision (usually upwards) as more data become available. The date upon which the SFA database was closed prior to the generation of the statistical tables is shown at the head of each table. PURSE SEINERS PRINCIPAL POINTS: The total purse seine tuna catch for the Western Indian Ocean in 2001 is now 295,936 Mt. This catch was achieved by an average of 50 vessels licensed per month. The total effort reported for the purse seine tuna fleet during 2001 was 13,871 days, thus giving a mean catch rate of 21.33 Mt/fishing day. The catch reported by purse seiners for the Western Indian Ocean (W10) within the first semester of 2002, was 140,704 Mt. This was the result of an average of 49 purse seiners licensed per month. The catch recorded during the same period of 2001, was 119,479 Mt, achieved by an average of 51 purse seiners licensed per month. An increase of 18% in catches was therefore recorded during the first semester of 2002. The highest catch recorded so far during that period of the year was in 2000, when some 241,710 Mt of tuna were caught. The average catch rate reported for the first semester of 2002 is 22.25 Mt/day, compared to 17.51 Mt/day in 2001. The highest catch rate so far recorded for that period of the year was in 1995 when 23.81 Mt of tuna were caught per fishing day. Table I shows the species composition of the total catch reported during the first semester of 2001 and 2002. SPECIES 2001 % 2002 % YELLOWFIN (Thunnus albacares) 56,107 47 60,525 43 SKIPJACK (katsuwonus pelamis) 53,922 45 74,374 53 OTHERS (Thunnus obesus & Thunnus alalunga) 9,450 8 5,805 4 TOTAL 119,479 140,704 • Some 6,323 fishing days were recorded during the first semester 2002, compared to 6,824 days recorded during the same period of the previous year. This represent a decrease of 7% or 501 fishing days. Readers should be well aware that the catch compositions given here are NOT based on scientific sampling but on the assessment of the fishermen who write the daily catch and effort reports and who decide into which group fish should be placed. They may be biased. It should be noted that the figures in Table 3 (Purse seiner transshipment statistics by harbour of transshipment) represent the transshipments of vessels whose trips ENDED in the month indicated and NOT the actual month of physical transshipment of the catch. The total amount of tuna unloaded through Victoria during the year 2001 was 248,454 Mt. During the first semester of 2002 a total of 116,341 Mt, representing 83% of the total catch was unloaded in Port Victoria, compared to 91,622 Mt, representing 79% of the total catch, unloaded during the same period of the previous year. An increase of 27% was recorded in the amount of tuna unloaded in port Victoria in 2002. LONGLINERS. PRINCIPAL POINTS: Readers should be aware that these statistics only represent a small sample of longliners activity in the WIO because: Not all longliners fishing in the WIO have a license to fish in the Seychelles EEZ and therefore are under no obligation to report to SFA. Some Distant Water Fishing Nations (DWFN) provide SFA with log sheets covering their activity in the whole Indian Ocean while others confine their reports to the Seychelles EEZ. The statistics published for 2001 are related to 80' logbooks received at the date of publication of this bulletin and a total of 2412 licenses were issued to 169 vessels. For the first semester of 2002 we received a total of 993 logbooks for the 824 licenses issued to 64 vessels. During the first semester 2002 the number of licences taken by Japanese vessels dropped by 24%. Furthermore there were no licences taken by vessels from South Korea and Spanish vessels did not renew their licences. The number of licences issued to Taiwanese vessels increased from 24 to 54. Analyses of data collected to date show that: The total catch reported to SFA by longliners for 2001 is now 5,712 Mt. This was achieved from a fishing effort of approximately 13.9 millions hooks and an average catch rate of 0.41 Mt/1000 hooks. The total catch reported for the first semester of 2002 is 2,606 Mt, obtained from a fishing effort of approximately 4.9 millions hooks and a mean catch rate of 0.54 Mt/1000 hooks. The mean CPUE reported by nationality was: 0.55 Mt/1000 hooks for the Japanese and 0.32 Mt/1000 hooks for the Taiwanese. It should be pointed out that these statistic will be revised when more data will be available. For this same period, yellowfin (Thunnus albacores) comprised 34% of the total catch, bigeye (Thunnus obesus) comprised 36% and other species (mainly billfishes and sharks) made up the remaining 30%. During the same period of the previous year yellowfin, bigeye and other species made up 41%, 40 % and 19 % of the total catch respectively.
  • Seychelles tuna bulletin: second quarter 1997

    Seychelles Fishing Authority (1997)
    Data used to generate the tables and figures presented here are based on daily catch and effort forms (logbooks) returned from fishing vessels which are licensed to fish in the Seychelles EEZ. Sometimes there is a delay in these being received at SFA, especially during and just after the second quarter of the year when most vessels are fishing in the Mozambique Channel. Readers should be aware that many of the figures presented here (especially the most recent) are subject to revision (usually upwards) as more data become available. The date upon which the SFA database was closed prior to the generation of the statistical tables is shown at the head of each table. Purse seiners PRINCIPAL POINTS The total purse seine tuna catch for the Western Indian Ocean in 1996 is now 265,658 t. This catch was achieved by an average of 49 vessels licensed per month. The total effort recorded for the purse seine fleet during 1996 was 12,948 fishing days, thus giving a mean catch rate of 20.52 t/fishing day. The highest recorded catch so far was in 1995 when 307,135 t of tuna were caught. The 1995 catch was the result of an average of 52 vessels licensed per month at an annual CPUE of 21.27 Wishing day, The highest annual CPUE on record was obtained in 1992 at 22.27 t/fishing day. The catch within the second quarter of 1997, was 48,222 t. This comprised of 13,691 t (29%) yellow fin (Thunnus albacares) and 28,587 t (59%) skipjack (Katsuwonus pelarnis). The remaining 5,944 t (12%) was mainly big eye (Thunnus obesus) and albacore (Thunnus alalunga). This compares with the catch within the second quarter of 1996 when some 18,288 t (36%) of yellowftn was caught, together with 25,631 t (51%) of skipjack and 6,474 t (13%) of bigeye and albacore. Some 3,460 days were fished in the second quarter of 1997 compared to 3,051 days for the equivalent period of 1996. The effort recorded for the second quarter of 1997 are some 409 days above that recorded for the same period in 1996. Considering that not all logbooks for the period under review have been received at the SFA, this difference between the two years is expected to increase further once all have been collected and processed. Readers should be well aware that the catch compositions given here are NOT based on scientific sampling but on the assessment of the fishermen who write the daily catch and effort reports and who decide into which group fish should be placed. They may be biased. The CPUE within the second quarter of 1997 was 13.94 tlfishing day compared to 16.52 t/fishing day in the equivalent quarter of the previous year. It should be noted that the figures in Table 3 (Purse seiner transhipment statistics by harbour of transhipment) represent the transhipments of vessels whose trips ENDED in the month indicated and NOT the actual month of physical transhipment of the catch. Transhipments through Victoria for the whole of 1996 was 163,657 t compared to 185,489 t in 1995. The 1996 transhipment figure for Port Victoria has decreased by 512 t from what was reported in the previous Tuna Bulletin. The 512 t has been reallocated to transhipment done at sea. The overall decrease in transhipment in Port Victoria during 1996 is the result of the lower catch during 1996 rather than a decrease in importance of Port Victoria. This is reflected in the the total transhipped in Port Victoria as a function of the total transhipped through all ports, whereby 61 % of the total transhipment during 1996 took place in Port Victoria, as has been the case for the last two years. During the second quarter transhipment in Port Victoria totalled 17,964 t. This is an increase of 9% compared to the figures obtained in the second quarter of 1996, when 16,368 t of tuna were transhipped. From Map 2 we can see that the fishing grounds exploited in the second quarter of 1997 were mostly the same as in the second quarter of 1996. However, more fish were caught in and around the Seychelles waters in 1997 than in 1996. Detailed analysis of the Mozambique Channel fishing season indicates that for 1997 the total catch for the area was up by 17% over the previous year's total. The catch rate had also increased from 14.49 tlfishing day in 1996 to 15.91 t/fishing day in 1997. Longliners Readers should be aware that these statistics only represent a small sample of longliner activity in the WIO because: Not all longliners fishing in the WIO have a licence to fish in the Seychelles EEZ and therefore are under no obligation to report to SFA. Not all those with a Seychelles licence provide daily log sheets especially the Taiwanese and the Koreans. Some Distant Water Fishing Nations (DWFN) provide SFA with log sheets covering their activity in the whole Indian Ocean while others confine their reports to the Seychelles EEZ. The statistics published for 1996 are related to only 56 logbooks received at the date of publication of this bulletin. 21 logbooks were received from the Japanese, 16 logbooks were received from the Taiwanese, I1 logbooks were received from the French and 8 logbooks were received from the South Koreans. A total of 342 licences were issued in 1996 , compared to 292 licences issued for 1995. For the second semester of 1997, only 13 logbooks have been received to date and 113 licences has been issued_ This underlines the poor and very slow reporting rate of longliners in general. When more data will be available, these statistics will be revised. Analysis of data collected to date show that: A fishing effort of 5147,413 hooks for a total catch of 2240 MT has been reported for 1996. The mean CPUE for the same period was 0.44 t/1000 hooks. The mean CPUE by nationality was: 0.6301000 hooks for the French, 0.53t/1000 hooks for the Japanese 0.31 t/1000 hooks for the South Koreans and 0.21t/1000 hooks for the Taiwanese fleet. For the first semester of 1997, a total fishing effort of 850,141 hooks for a total catch of 511 MT has been reported. The mean CPUE for the same period was 0.60 01000 hooks. The mean CPUE by nationality was 0.67 t/1000 hooks for the French, 0.60 t/1000 hooks for the Japanese, 0.53 1/1000 hooks for the Taiwanese, 0.45 t/1000 hooks for the South Koreans, and 0.40 t/1000 hooks for the Spanish fleet. For this same period, first semester of 1997, according to logbooks received, Yellowfin (Thunnus albacores) comprised 47% of the total catch, Rigeye (Atoms nbesus) comprised 30% and other species (billfishes) comprised 23%. The French and Spanish longliners targeted billfishes (57% and 100 % of their total catch). The principal fishing areas for the second quarter of 1997 were located: at the north, north-west and central part inside the Seychelles EEZ (see map no. 4).
  • Seychelles tuna bulletin: First quarter 1992

    Seychelles Fishing Authority (1992)
    The number of purse seiners active in the western Indian Ocean averaged 53 during the first quarter compared to 41 vessels during the same period last year. Fishing activity was high during the first half of the year with a record for the month of March of 55 licensed vessels. The fishing results for the first quarter were not as good as those previously recorded in the last three years, however there are still 28 logbooks outstanding at the time of publication. Catch rates averaged 14.6 MT/day compared to 22MT/day in 1991 and 26MT/day in 1990. The high number of vessels licensed during the first quarter can be attributed to increased number of licenses issued to French and Japanese vessles. 1992 has been a notably strong El Nino year, giving rise to a dramatic change in climatic and oceanograhic conditions. This, however, has resulted in a higher than normal concentration of fishing activity in the Mozambique Channel during the first quarter. The purse seine fleet has yet to start intensive fishing in the western Indian Ocean. The usual high percentage of yellowfin tuna in the first quarter catch statistics cannot be observed for this year. The catch has been dominated by skipjack, which in previous years, especially 1991 had a much lower percentage of the Western Indian Ocean based on logbooks received by 31st March, stands at 42 787 MT for 1992. Transhipment in Port Victoria, during the first quarter, shows that more skipjack is being transhipped than yellowfin. The number of vessels transhipping is relatively high at 111 vessels compared to the 1991 figure of 77 vessels. However the total weight of fish transhipped is less than the 1991 figure, of 47 151 MT, at 45 415 MT. During 1991 two new fishing agreements were signed, one with Japan allowing for more Japanese purse seiners to obtain fishing licenses. The other agreement was with Iran permitting two seiners to fish within the Seychelles EEZ.
  • Seychelles tuna bulletin : first quarter 1997

    Seychelles Fishing Authority (1997)
    Data used to generate the tables and figures presented here are based on daily catch and effort forms (logbooks) returned from fishing vessels which are licensed to fish in the Seychelles EEZ. Sometimes there is a del{--y in these being received at SFA, especially during and just after the second quarter of the year when most vessels are fishing in the Mozambique Channel. Readers should be aware that many of the figures presented here (especially the most recent) are subject to revision (usually upwards) as more data become available. The date upon which the SFA database was closed prior to the generation of the statistical tables is shown at the head of each table. Purse seiners. PRINCIPAL POINTS: The total purse seine tuna catch for the Western Indian Ocean in 1996 is now 265,658 t. This catch was achieved by an average of 49 vessels licensed per month. The total effort recorded for the purse seine fleet during 1996 was 12,948 fishing days, thus giving a mean catch rate of 20.52 t/fishing day. The highest recorded catch so far was in 1995 when 307,135 t of tuna were caught. The 1995 catch was the result of an average of 52 vessels licensed per month at an annual CPUE of 21.27 t/fishing day. The highest annual CPUE on record was obtained in 1992 at 22.27 t/fishing day. The catch within the first quarter of 1997, was 48,132 t. This comprised of 18,030 t (37%) yellowfin (Thunnus albacares) and 25,747 t (54%) skipjack (Katsuwonus pelarnis). The remaining 4,355 t (9%) was mainly big eye (Thunnus obelus) and albacore (Thunnus alalunga). This compares with the catch within the first quarter of 1996 when some 19,637 t (39%) of yellowfin was caught, together with 23,116 t (46%) of skipjack and 7,047 t (15%) of bigeye and albacore. • Some 2,505 days were fished in the first quarter of 1997 compared to 3,307 days for the equivalent period of 1996. The effort recorded for the first quarter of 1997 are some 802 days short of that recorded for the same period in 1996. However, this difference between the two years is expected to decrease once all logbooks, for the period under review, have been collected and processed. Readers should be well aware that the catch compositions given here are NOT based on scientific sampling but on the assessment of the fishermen who write the daily catch and effort reports and who decide into which group fish should be placed. They may be biased. The CPUE within the first quarter of 1997 was 19.21 tifishing day compared to 15.06 t/fishing day in the equivalent quarter of the previous year. It should be noted that the figures in Table 3 (Purse seiner transhipment statistics by harbour of transhipment) represent the transhipments of vessels whose trips ENDED in the month indicated and NOT the actual month of physical transhipment of the catch. Transhipments through Victoria for the whole of 1996 was 164,169 t compared to 185,489 t in 1995. This is a 12% decrease over the 1995 figure. This decrease is as a result of the lower catch during 1996 rather than a decrease in importance of Port Victoria. This is reflected in the the total transhipped in Port Victoria as a function of the total transhipped through all ports, whereby 61% of the total transhipment during 1996 took place in Port Victoria, as has been the case for the last two years. During the first quarter transhipment in Port Victoria totalled 60,497 t this is an increase of 33% compared to the figures obtained in the first quarter of 1996, when 45,360 t of tuna were transhipped. Based on the data available, we can see that fishing activities in the first quarter of 1997 were concentrated in and around the Seychelles EEZ. Some activities were also recorded between the Seychelles EEZ and the Chagos Archipelago. Unlike the previous year very little fishing took place in the Mozambique Channel in the first three months of 1997. Once all logbooks have been gathered and processed a more meaningful comparison of fishing grounds exploited in the relevent quaters of the two years may be obtained since the data being used at present does not cover the activities of all vessels during the first quarter of 1997. Longliners Readers should be aware that these statistics only represent a small sample of longliner activity in the WIO because: Not all longliners fishing in the WIO have a licence to fish in the Seychelles EEZ and therefore are under no obligation to report to SFA. Not all those with a Seychelles licence provide daily log sheets especially the Taiwanese and the Koreans. Some Distant Water Fishing Nations (DWFN) provide SFA with log sheets covering their activity in the whole Indian Ocean while others confine their reports to the Seychelles EEZ. The statistics for 1996 are related to only 56 logbooks received at the date of publication of this bulletin. 21 logbooks were received from the Japanese, 16 logbooks were received from the Taiwanese, 11 logbooks were received from the French and 8 logbooks were received from the South Koreans. A total of 342 licences were issued in 1996, compared to 292 licences issued for 1995. For the first quarter of 1997, only 1 logbook has been received to date and 113 licences has been issued. This underlines the poor and very slow reporting rate of longliners in general. When more data will be available, these statistics will be revised. Analysis of data collected to date show that: Longliner activity was concentrated at the beginning or end of the year (first and last quarter) with little or no fishing from May to. August. A fishing effort of 5,147,413 hooks for a total catch of 2,246 MT has been reported for 1996. The mean CPUE for the same period was 0.44 t/1000 hooks. The mean CPUE by nationality was: 0.63 t/1000 hooks for the French, 0.53 t/1000 hooks for the Japanese 0.31 t/1000 hooks for the South Koreans and 0.21 t/1000 hooks for the Taiwanese fleet. Yellowfin (Thunnus albacores) comprised 53% of the total catch for 1996, Bigeye (Thunnus obesus) comprised 32% and other species (billfishes) comprised 15%. The French longliners targeted billfishes (57% of their total catch). The principal fishing areas for the first quarter of 1997 were located: at the central part inside and the south-eastern part inside and outside of the Seychelles EEZ.
  • Seychelles tuna bulletin : first quarter 1990

    Seychelles Fishing Authority (1990)
    The number of purse seiners active in the Western Indian Ocean peaked to an all times high for the first quarter of 1990 ranging from 50 in January to 53 in March. This represents an increase over the same period last year when an average of 48 vessels was in operation. Fishing results were rather poor throughout the first quarter of this year. Catch rates increased only slightly from a low of 8.18 mt/day in December 1989 to 16.7 mt/day in March 1990. The proportion of yellow fin in the catch however increased considerably from 39% in December to 67% in February 1990, with a corresponding decrease in the proportion of skipjack in the catch. This is usual for this time of the years when yellow fin is the predominant species. The fishing pattern was somewhat the same as for the proceeding year with fishing activity concentrated to the East of the Seychelles EEZ. This year however the vessels began to move earlier to the South and South West with a few vessels already fishing in the Mozambique Channel by March. The total catch for purse seiners fishing in the Western Indian Ocean for 1989 was 223,000 mt. As determined from seiner logbooks received by the 31st of March 1990, the cumulative catch by purse seiners in the Western Indian Ocean for the first quarter of 1990 now stands at 46,604 MT.
  • Seychelles tuna bulletin : third quarter 1991

    Seychelles Fishing Authority (1991)
    The number of purse seiners active in the Western Indian Ocean increased slightly from 42 at the end of the last quarter to 45 in September. Fishing results improved slightly in the third quarter, with the average catch rates increasing from 15.8 MT/day in the second quarter to an average of 19.0 MT/day in the third quarter. This represents a slight drop from the same period last year when catch rates averaged 22.0 MT per day; however, it is an improvement over the catch rate of 16.0 MT/day for the same period in 1989. The fishing pattern for the third quarter showed that fishing effort was concentrated between 5 degrees north and 5 degrees south of the Equator in the vicinity of the Northern sector of the Seychelles EEZ. This follows the same pattern as in preceding years. Fifty six percent of the third quarter catch was composed of skipjack which compares favorably with the catch of this species for the same period last year. Moreover, as in previous years, the catch of yellow fin declined from 60% in July to 39% in August and 18% in September. The cumulative catch by purse seiners operating in the Western Indian Ocean as determined from seiner logbooks received by the 30th September 1991 now stands at 155,912 MT.
  • Seychelles tuna bulletin : fourth quarter 1990

    Seychelles Fishing Authority (1990)
    The number of purse seiners active in the western Indian Ocean average 41 during the fourth quarter compared to 49 vessels during the same period last year. Fishing activity was high during the first half of the year with a record of 54 vessels present in February and March. The overall fishing results for the year were not as good as those previously recorded in the last three years. Catch rates averaged 16MT/day compared to 18 MT/day in 1989 and 22 MT/day in 1988, attaining a similar level to results of 1986. This was due to poor fishing conditions during January to May causing several vessels to leave the Indian Ocean in June. However this situation changed as catch rates improved during the second half of the year, with exceptionally high yellow fin catches for this period. The overall catches for the year showed increased proportions of yellow fin at 46% with a corresponding decline in skip jack (52%) compared to 31% and 67% respectively in 1989. The cumulative catch by purse seiners in the Western Indian Ocean based on logbooks received by 31st December now stands at 193,000 MT for 1990. It is expected that the annual catch for 1990 will almost reach the level of 1989, when 227,000 MT were recorded. During 1990 fishing agreements with the European Community and the Soviet Fishing Company (SOVRYFLOT) were renewed for a two year period. Seven additional purse-seiners (six Spanish, one French) were operating under private licenses.
  • Seychelles tuna bulletin: third quarter 1997

    Seychelles Fishing Authority (1997)
    Data used to generate the tables and figures presented here are based on daily catch and effort forms (logbooks) returned from fishing vessels which are licensed to fish in the Seychelles EEZ. Sometimes there is a delay in these being received at SFA, especially during and just after the second quarter of the year when most vessels are fishing in the Mozambique Channel. Readers should be aware that many of the figures presented here (especially the most recent) are subject to revision (usually upwards) as more data become available. The date upon which the SFA database was closed prior to the generation of the statistical tables is shown at the head of each table. Purse seiners. PRINCIPAL POINTS: The total purse seine tuna catch for the Western Indian Ocean in 1996 is now 265,658 t. This catch was achieved by an average of 49 vessels licensed per month. The total effort recorded for the purse seine fleet during 1996 was 12,948 fishing days, thus giving a mean catch rate of 20.52 t/fishing day. The highest recorded catch so far was in 1995 when 307,135 t of tuna were caught. The 1995 catch was the result of an average of 52 vessels licensed per month at an annual CPUE of 21.27 t/fishing day. The highest annual CPUE on record was obtained in 1992 at 22.27 Wishing day. The catch within the third quarter of 1997, was 61,927 t. This comprised of 15,287 t (25%) yellowfin (Thunnus albacares) and 41,355 t (67%) skipjack (Katsuwonus pelamis). The remaining 5,285 t (8%) was mainly big eye (Thunnus abesus) and albacore (Thunnus alalunga). This compares with the catch within the third quarter of 1996 when some 31,222 t (39%) of yellowfin was caught, together with 42,235 t (53%) of skipjack and 6,855 t (8%) of bigeye and albacore. • Some 3,732 days were fished in the third quarter of 1997 compared to 3,089 days for the equivalent period of 1996. The effort recorded for the third quarter of 1997 are some 643 days above that recorded for the same period in 1996. Considering that not all logbooks for the period under review have been received at the SFA, this difference between the two years is expected to increase further once all logbooks have been collected and processed. Readers should be well aware that the catch compositions given here are NOT based on scientific sampling but on the assessment of the fishermen who write the daily catch and effort reports and who decide into which group fish should be placed. They may be biased. The CPUE within the third quarter of 1997 was 16.59 t/fishing day compared to 26.00 t/fishing day in the equivalent quarter of the previous year. It should be noted that the figures in Table 3 (Purse seiner transhipment statistics by harbour of transhipment) represent the transhipments of vessels whose trips ENDED in the month indicated and NOT the actual month of physical transhipment of the catch. Tanshipments through Victoria for the whole of 1996 was 163,657 t compared to 185,489 tin 1995. The overall decrease in transhipment in Port Victoria during 1996 is the result of the lower catch during 1996 rather than a decrease in importance of Port Victoria. This is reflected in the total transhipped in Port Victoria as a function of the total transhipped through all ports, whereby 61% of the total transhipment during 1996 took place in Port Victoria, as has been the case for the last two years. Within the third quarter transhipment in Port Victoria totalled 49,387 t this is an increase of 16 % compared to the figures obtained in the third quarter of 1996. when 42,433 t of tuna were transhipped. • Fishing grounds exploited during the third quarter of 1997 are similar to those of the same quarter of 1996. However, more fish were caught to the north-east of the Somali Basin than in the equivalent quarter of the previous year. Longliners Readers should be aware that these statistics only represent a small sample of longliner activity in the W1O because: • Not all longliners fishing in the WIO have a licence to fish in the Seychelles EEZ and therefore are under no obligation to report to SFA. • Not all those with a Seychelles licence provide daily log sheets especially the Taiwanese and the Koreans, • Some Distant Water Fishing Nations (DWFN) provide SFA with log sheets covering their activity in the whole Indian Ocean while others confine their reports to the Seychelles EEZ. The statistics published for 1996 are related to only 56 logbooks received at the date of publication of this bulletin. 21 logbooks were received from the Japanese, 16 logbooks were received from the Taiwanese, 11 logbooks were received from the French and 8 logbooks were received from the South Koreans. A total of 342 licences were issued in 1996 , compared to 292 licences issued for 1995. For the third quarter of 1997, only 17 logbooks have been received to date and 180 licences have been issued. This underlines the poor and very slow reporting rate of longliners in general. When more data will be available, these statistics will be revised. Analysis of data collected to date show that: • A fishing effort of 5147,413 hooks for a total catch of 2240 MT has been reported for 1996. The mean CPUE for the same period was 0.44 t/I000 hooks. The mean CPUE by nationality was: 0.63t/1000 hooks for the French, 0.53t/1000 hooks for the Japanese 0.31 0000 hooks for the South Koreans, 0.21tJI000 hooks for the Taiwanese fleet. and 0.40 t/1000 hooks for the Spanish fleet. • Up to the third quarter of 1997, a total fishing effort of 980,941 hooks for a total catch of 574 MT has been reported. The mean CPUE for the third quarter of 1997 was 0.23 t/1000 hooks. The mean CPUE reported by nationality was : 0.28 t/I000 hooks for the Japanese and 0.18 t/1000 hooks for the South Koreans. • The species composition for the third quarter of 1997, according to logbooks received; YeBowfin (Thus ups albacores) comprised 45% of the total catch, Bigeye (Mama obesus) comprised 45% and other species (billfishes) comprised 10%.of the total catch. • The principal fishing areas for the third quarter of 1997 were located: at the east and south eastern part inside and outside the Seychelles EEZ (see map no. 4).
  • Seychelles tuna bulletin : second quarter 1990

    Seychelles Fishing Authority (1990)
    The number of purse seiners active in the Western Indian Ocean decreased sharply from an all high of 54 in the first quarter of 1990 to 44 by June. This, however, still represents an increase in the number of active vessels from the same period last year when there were 38 vessels in operation. Fishing results continued to be poor throughout the second quarter, showing only a slight improvement in June. Catch rates were an all time low since 1985 averaging 10.3 MT/day for the quarter compared to 13.5 MT/day for the same period in 1989. The proportion of yellow fin in the catch decreased to 25% in April, 23% in May and then recovered remarkably in June (80%). These results however are not entirely unusual for this time of the year. The fishing pattern followed that established in the preceding years with fishing activities concentrated in the Mozambique Channel during April and May and vessels moving northward by June. This year, however, the fleet was more widely dispersed as vessels moved around to find fish. The poor fishing results might in part be attributed to abnormal oceanographic conditions including the occurrence of the cyclone Kinjo in the second half of May 1990 which even attained the latitude of the Seychelles Group. As determined from seiner logbooks received by the 30th June 1990, the cumulative catch by purse seiners in the Western Indian Ocean for 1990 now stands at 65,781 tones.
  • Seychelles tuna bulletin : fourth quarter 1989

    Seychelles Fishing Authority (1989)
    The number of purse seiners active in the Western Indian Ocean increased to 51 during the last quarter of 1989, to peak at 52 vessels in November, this being the highest number of vessels recorded in this fishery so far. During the same period last year the number of vessels in operation increased from 43 in October to 48 at the end of the year. The overall fishing performance of the fleet throughout the year is comparable to that obtained in previous years. The fishing results however were not as good as that obtained during 1988. Daily catch rates averaged 18.6 MT, compared to 22 MT in 1988 and 17.9 MT in 1987. Skipjack was the predominant species caught, comprising 67% of the catch with a corresponding marked decrease in the proportion of yellow fin from 47% in 1988 to 31% in 1989. The fishing pattern was somewhat different to that observed in previous years: as yellow fin catch rates were unusually low and remained depressed throughout the year. The fishing effort was more widely distributed as vessels searched for yellow fin, or congregated in locations where excellent skipjack catches prevailed. The skipjack fishing season starting April/May around the Mozambique Channel was cut short as was also the case in the previous two years. The change in yellow fin availability is believed to be caused by unfavorable oceanographic conditions rather than due to stock depletion, whereby the fish remained deeper and thus less accessible to the fishing vessels. As determined from seiner logbooks received by the 31st of December 1989 the cumulative catch by purse seiners in the Western Indian Ocean now stands at 221,017 tones for 1989. It is estimated that the total landings would reach 230,000 MT, the same level as that recorded in 1988. During 1989, new arrangements were reached with Japanese Fishing Companies and other private companies, allowing additional purse seiners to fish in the Seychelles EEZ. The EEC Agreement was in the process of being re-negotiated.
  • Seychelles tuna bulletin : first quarter 1989

    Seychelles Fishing Authority (1989)
    The number of purse seiners active in the Western Indian Ocean remained high during the first quarter of 1989, ranging from 49 in January to 48 in March. This represents a significant increase in the number of vessels over the same period last year when an average of 36 vessels was in operation. Excellent fishing results prevailed throughout the first quarter of this year. Catch rates reached a record high, for that period, of 26 MT/day compared to 18 MT/day for the same period last year. The proportion of yellow fin in the catch dropped from 58% in January to 36% in March, with a corresponding increase in the proportion of skipjack from 40% to 63%. This is unusual for this time of the year, when yellow fin is the predominant species in the catch. The fishing pattern was somewhat different to that of previous years, where fishing activity took place inside and to the east of the Seychelles EEZ and good yellow fin catches were obtained during that period. This year in February, vessels started to move to the North-West of the EEZ and by March fishing activity was concentrated in that area with excellent catches of skipjack. The total catch by purse seiners in the Western Indian Ocean for 1988 was estimated at 230,000 MT. As determined from seiner logbooks received by the 31st of March 1989 the cumulative catch by purse seiners in the Western Indian Ocean for the first quarter of 1989, now stands at 60,280 MT.

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