• Activite des embarcations impliquees dans la peche a la ligne a main aux Seychelles.

      Bach, P. (Victoria: Seychelles Fishing Authority, 1989)
      Fishing performances of four different types of boats (pirogues, outboard, whalers, schooners) are studied through the analysis of the temporal evolution, between July 1985 and June 1988, for four parameters: numbers of active fishing boats,- total number of fishing trips, - average number of trips/boat, - average trip duration. The trends from these analysis reveals that the boats involved in the handline fishery in seychelles have evolved considerably. These changes must be taken into consideration in the case of an eventual reorganisation of the fleet.
    • Analyse des donnees collectees lors des embarquements a bord des senneurs bases aux Seychelles (1986-1991)

      Hallier, J.P.; Sabadach, B. (Victoria: Seychelles Fishing Authority, 1993-01)
      From 1986 to 1991, observers on board tuna purse-seiners based in Seychelles allow analysis of data such as oceanographic parameters, aspects of tuna schools and their associated sightings, as well as fishing characteristics (success rate, catches, cpue, species composition, duration of fishing sets). Performances of the four concerned countries (France, Spain, Japan, USSR) are compared.
    • Analyse des donneés collecteés lors des embarquements à bord des senneurs basés aux Seychelles (1986-1989)

      de Montaudouin, X.; Hallier, J.-P.; Hassani, S. (Seychelles Fishing AuthorityVictoria, Seychelles, 1990)
      The tuna purse seine fishery based in Seychelles is analysed using data collected by observers on board French, Spanish, Japanese and Soviet vessels. From 1986 to 1989, diffferent types of data were recorded such as meteorolical and oceanographic parameters, aspects and sizes of schools sighted, seiner activities, fishing characteristics (catch, yield, duration of fishing sets). Reliability of observers data with respect to catches is assessed by comparison with log data from French purse seiners.
    • Artisanal fishing boats in Seychelles

      Payet, R.J. (Seychelles Fishing AuthorityVictoria, Seychelles, 1996)
      The results of a census of fishing boats on Mahe, Praslin and La Digue are presented. In total 437 boats were counted of which 278 were outboards with engine, 48 were open whaler, 35 were pirogues, 25 were lekonomi, 22 were schooners, 11 were semi-industrial so were lavenir, 12 were 'others', 8 were whaler with deck, 4 were nouvo lavenir and 3 were wooden boats without engines. The details are discussed to understand the characteristics of the artisanal fishing boats. An analysis of the historical data follows. The number of pirogues and schooners decreased from 1985 to 1995, whilst the numbers of whalers have increased. Outboards on the other hand had remained relatively stable. The changes in the number of boats are a result of interaction between the available near shore and offshore fishery resource and the development of commercial opportunities, social and economic constrains and the effects of the fisheries policies.
    • Artisanal fishing boats in the Seychelles

      Mees, C. C. (Seychelles Fishing AuthorityVictoria, Seychelles, 1989)
      The results of a census of fishing boats on Mahe Praslin and La Digue are presented in total 439 active fishing boats were counted of which 156 were pirogues, 196 were outboards, 68 were whalers and 19 were schooners. The details are discussed in relation to the catch assessment survey conducted by Seychelles fishing Authority. An evaluation of historical data follows. the number of pirogues and outboards increased up to 1986 and declined thereafter. The number of whalers steadily increased since1985 whilst the number of schooners has not changed significantly. It is argued that the changes in boat numbers are a results of interactions between the available near shore and offshore resources, the development of commercial opportunities through the Seychelles Marketing Board, and the effects of fisheries policies towards the promotion of outboard and inboard motors and boats. An assessment of the future boat requirements is presented and discussed in the light of development goals.
    • A bibliography of the living marine resources of the Seychelles

      Grandcourt, E.M. (Seychelles Fishing AuthorityVictoria, Seychelles, 1995)
      A bibliography of the living Marine Resources of the Seychelles was prepared as part of the activities of the national technical assistance for the 'Assessment of the Living Marine Resources' of the Seychelles within Phase 1 (Ecological and Socio-Economic Assessment) of the Commission De L' Ocean lndien/Fonds Europeen De Developpement Environment Project. (Project FED No 7 ACP RPR 068).
    • Biomass, stock density and the maximum sustainable yield available to a line fishery for Pristipomoides filamentosus (Valenciennes, 1830) on the Northwestern submarine promontory of Saya de Malha Bank

      Grandcourt, E.M. (Victoria: Seychelles Fishing Authority, 1994)
      The mothership/dory fishing operation 'Pecheur Breton' spent 13 days fishing at the northwestern submarine promontory of Saya de Malha Bank between 24th February and 14th March 1993. The mothership fished using 12 dories which were equipped with echo-sounders and electric fishing reels. A total of 74.3 tonnes of fish was caught in the depth range of 55 to 130 m. of which the blue spotted jobfish (Pristipomoides filamentosus) represented 80%. The catch rates were observed to decreased with time and could not be attributed to changes in climatic conditions, fishing depth, fishing method or bait type. The initial biomass of Pristipomoides filamentosus at the northwestern submarine promontory of Saya de Malha Bank was estimated at 76.1 tonnes through application of the Leslie constant catchability model. Biomass densities of 2,478 kg/km² and 1,264 kg/km-1 were obtained by applying the initial biomass estimates to the surface area of the grounds fished. The quantity removed by the mothership/dory fishing operation was found to be more than 3 times the estimated maximum sustainable yield.
    • Coastal profile of Beau Vallon-intergrated coastal area management programme EAF/5 project: integrated coastal area management project

      Grandcourt, E.M. (Victoria: Seychelles Fishing Authority, 1995)
      The EAF/5 Integrated Coastal Area Management Project is a multi-lateral project between the countries of the East African Region and the United Nations Environment Programme. The participating countries include Kenya, Tanzania, Zanzibar, Mozambique, Madagascar, Mauritius, Comoros and the Seychelles. The project forms part of the activities of the Oceans and Coastal Areas Programme Activity Centre (OCA/PAC) of the United Nations Environment Programme within the framework of the Action Plan for the Protection, Management and Development of the Marine and Coastal Environment of the East African Region. The completion of this work represents the end of the first phase of the EAF/5 project which involved the training of the nationals from the participating countries. This report presents the results of a literature and data search for a pilot study site (Beau Vallon). The objective of the coastal profile is to assemble a core set of socio-economic, physical and environmental data that will enable the identification of information gaps. This will assist in focusing subsequent research on the creation of a comprehensive database to be used for integrated coastal area management. The coasta profile is also intended to help identify the resources, activities, users, habitats and protected areas as well as major resource management issues such as environmentally critical zones, dominant physical processes and development patterns, user conflicts and specific issues for an integrated coastal area managemnet programme in the study area. The data presented were obtained from a wide variety of sources including: published and unpublished scientific papers and government reports, books, maps and navigation charts, interviews, questionnaires, personal observations and established databases. The data refers to the study site wherever possible, however, when data was not available information was given for the nearest spatial level and indicated in the text. The majority of the data referred to has been included in the annexes contained in the draft for easy reference and to assist with the establishment of the database in the future.
    • The development of the lobster fishery in the Seychelles

      Bautil, B.R.R. (Seychelles Fishing AuthorityVictoria, Seychelles, 1991)
      Two different groups of lobsters are of commercial importance in the Seychelles: spiny lobsters and slipper lobsters. The spiny lobsters are: Panulirus penicillatus, Panulirus longipes, Panulirus versicolor and Panulirus ornatus. Fishing for spiny lobster in Seychelles is a traditional activity in the shallow waters surrounding the main granitic Islands. Fishing is conducted at night by skin divers operating with lights. Following the development of the tourist industry during the seventies the local demand for lobsters increased to several tonnes a year. After being open for many years, the fishery was closed from 1983 to 1989. The fishery was reopen from December 1989 to May 1990, during which time an estimated 10 tonnes of spiny lobsters were supplied to the local market. The regulations for lobster fishing included: a closed season from the 1st May to 30th of September; a minimal size of 7,5 cm cephalothoracic length; a ban on the catching of berried females; no fishing was allowed in marine parks and reserves; and all lobsters had to be sold alive to one company (SMB). Subsequently, the fishery was closed again due to abuse of the regulations. Since the closure, 15 tonnes of frozen lobsters per year were imported from Singapore, representing an expenditure of 225.000 US$. The imported lobsters are of the same species as the local one. In September 1991, a lobster survey began, to better assess the resource on the granitic areas of the Mahe plateau. It is anticipated that if limited to the granitic areas a well managed artisanal fishery will not supply 15 tonnes a year to the local market. It is therefore recommended that the lobster artisanal fishery be developed in the outer Islands. One of the main constraints of that development is a problem of quality control. It is felt that this constraint could be overcome by using the right preservation methods and by organizing training course. A research survey in the Amirantes is proposed in order to better assess the resource and assess the development possibilities.
    • The fishermen of Seychelles: Results of a socio-economic study of Seychelles fishing community

      Mees, C. C. (Seychelles Fishing AuthorityVictoria, Seychelles, 1990)
      OBJECTIVES: The present study was conducted to evaluate the socio_economic status of Seychelles fishing community in order to provide a foundation for formulation of rational management and policy decisions relating to the artisanal fishing sector. ANALYSIS: The data generated were analysed by boat - type, and by analytical strata thus: Crew, All skippers, skipper-owners with a loan, skipper-owners without a loan, share skippers (non boat owners). SURVEY COVERAGE: 300 interviews were conducted on the islands of Mahe, Praslin and La Digue, of which 112 were crew members and 188 were skippers. It was estimated that the skippers of 60.3% of all full-time fishing boats were interviewed. The coverage was greater for schooners (100%) and whalers (71.6%) than outboards (57.2%) and pirogues (45.5%). In relation to the number of men rather than boats, it was estimated that up to 1000 people may be fishing on a casual basis, but that the true number of ‘commercial’ fishermen is in the range 475-640, giving a survey coverage of 47%-63%. This number represents approximately 2.7% of the entire working population. Agriculture, forestry and fisheries account for 8.1% of the working population, of which 62.6% were farm workers, 3.8% worked in forestry, and 33.6% were fishermen or marine rangers.
    • Fishery Independent Indices for the Seychelles Lobster Resource.

      SFA Fisheries Research (Seychelles Fishing AuthorityVictoria, Seychelles, 2014)
    • The industrial tuna fishing activity in the western Indian Ocean report for the year 2002: Impact on the economy of Seychelles

      Marguerite, M.A. (Seychelles Fishing AuthorityVictoria, Seychelles, 2003)
      Fishing has traditionally played an important role in the socio-economic development of the country, providing an important source of exports and foreign exchange earnings, job creation, government revenue and most of all an important source of animal protein for the population. With the emergence of Port Victoria as a major tuna landing and transshipment center in the region coupled with the country's venture in tuna canning activity, the importance of the fisheries sector has grown even further to establish itself as a major economic activity, an important source of foreign exchange earnings and contributor to the country's wealth generation. The Industrial Tuna Fishing Activity in Seychelles has since its outset been an important source of revenue for the country's economy, representing almost 25% of gross inflows of foreign currency generated by the fisheries sector and associated activities in 2002. This contribution is not only in terms of earnings from the issue of licenses to foreign fishing vessels to fish in our Economic Exclusive Zone, but more importantly in terms of expenditure on local purchases of goods and services effected by these foreign vessels and foreign fishing companies based in Port Victoria. With Port Victoria being the principal base for these foreign fishing vessels implies that a number of job opportunities are created for Seychellois nationals as well as creating other spillover effects in the economy. Moreover, tuna landed in Port Victoria is also a main source of raw material for the local canning factory, which in turns generates further employment for Seychellois nationals and export earnings. After experiencing a significant drop in 1998, the gross earnings from the industrial tuna fishing activity has been growing steadily over the following two to three years and a record inflow was registered in the year 2000, after which slight decreases have been observed in subsequent years.
    • The industrial tuna fishing activity in the western Indian Ocean, report for the year 1999 : Impact on the economy of Seychelles

      Commetant, B. (Seychelles Fishing AuthorityVictoria, Seychelles, 2000)
      The fishing industry of the Seychelles economy has from its outset been one of the main traditional economic activities and stands to remain an important pillar of the country's economy. It is a valuable source of revenue in terms of earnings from licence fees issued, fishing vessels and companies' expenditures on local purchases of goods and services in addition to creating job opportunities notwithstanding the important amount of foreign currency that it earns the country. At the end of 1999 and throughout the last decade, Port Victoria maintained its position as the principle tuna port in the Indian Ocean. This was partly due to Seychelles central position in the Western Indian Ocean and its close proximity to the tuna fishing grounds. The port infrastructure and good services are also important reasons for its success. In comparison to the overall fishing activity in the region, a remarkable and significant amount of tuna is caught, landed and transhipped in Port Victoria on an annual basis. In addition to the contributions outlined, tuna landed in Port Victoria is a major source of raw material input for the local canning factory, one of the country's main exports. Contrary to the preceding year, the year 1999 saw a remarkable augmentation in performance of the sector. A significant increase was recorded in the amount of revenue generated from the industrial tuna fishing activity. Growth was registered in expenditure by fishing vessels, expenditure by foreign fishing companies based in Seychelles, licence fees earned and net revenue. Port activity in terms of the number of calls made and the number of days spent in port also went up.
    • The industrial tuna fishing activity in the Western Indian Ocean, Report for the year 2000: Impact on the economy of Seychelles

      Marguerite, M.A. (Seychelles Fishing AuthorityVictoria, Seychelles, 2001)
      Fishing has traditionally played an important role in the socio-economic development of the country providing an important source of exports and foreign exchange earnings, job creation, government revenue and most of all an important source of animal protein for the population. With the emergence of Port Victoria as a major tuna landing and transshipment center in the region coupled with the country's venture in tuna canning activity, the importance of the fisheries sector has grown even further to establish itself as a major source of foreign exchange earnings and contributor to the country's wealth generation. The Industrial Tuna Fishing Activity in the Western Indian Ocean has since its outset been an important source of revenue for the Seychelles economy, representing almost a third of gross inflow of foreign currency generated by the fisheries sector and associated activities. This contribution is not only in terms of earnings from the issue of licenses to foreign fishing vessels to fish in our Economic Exclusive Zone, but also in terms of expenditure on local purchases of goods and services effected by these foreign vessels and foreign fishing companies. With Port Victoria being the principal base for these foreign fishing vessels imply that a number of job opportunities are created for Seychellois nationals as well as creating other spill-over effects in the economy. Moreover, tuna landed in Port Victoria is also a main source of raw materials for the local canning factory, which in turns generate further employment for Seychellois nationals and exports earnings. After experiencing a significant drop in 1998, the gross earnings from the industrial tuna fishing activity has been growing steadily over the last two years and a record inflow was registered in the year 2000. On the other hand, the number of calls and days spent in port affected by the foreign fishing vessels, including support and reefer vessels, experienced a drop. The volume of tuna landed and transshipped in Port Victoria registered a small increase as Seychelles maintained its position as the major tuna center in the region. For the year 2000, the gross revenue generated by the Industrial Tuna Fishing Activity reached a record level of RS 314.882 millions. This includes vessels' and companies' expenditure on local purchases of goods and services and receipts from licenses issued. The net revenue on the other hand did not reached a record level. Net inflow stood at RS 131.128 millions in 2000 representing only 42% of total gross inflow. Calculated in dollar terms at current exchange rate the gross revenue stood at US$ 50.8 millions whereas the net revenue stood at US$ 18.6 millions. As regards to activity in Port Victoria, the total number of calls registered fell from 709 in 1999 to 651 in 2000, whilst the number of days spent in port by all vessels dropped from 4,994 in 1999 to 4,373 in 2000. The volume of transshipment however, grew marginally by 4.7%, from around 257,500 metric tons in 1999 to approximately 269,700 in 2000. This represented more than 80% of the total tuna caught in the Western Indian Ocean and transshipped. On the international scene the market for raw materials tended to normalize in 2000. After heavy supply towards the end of 1999 causing prices to drop to its lowest level in 25 years, the situation changed completely in the beginning of 2000. There was a shortage for raw materials on the market as many boats stopped operation as fishing had become uneconomical and in addition, there were fishing bans in certain areas. During the year, skipjack prices remained at a level of US $ 400/mt for several months and only moved to US 430/mt in December. Prices improvement were also foreseen for yellow-fin by December. In order to normalize trade and increase the raw material prices, several countries implemented measures to reduce catches or fishing effort. The World Tuna Boat Owners Organization at its second meeting in December 2000 followed their initiatives. The main resolutions were to limit fishing effort and reduce catch, stimulate consumer demand for tuna on domestic and international markets and producing volume that will only match demand. Even if the short-term impact of the tuna catch reduction was expected to be minimal, in the long run substantial increase was expected in tuna prices, which could well last into the year 2002.
    • The industrial tuna fishing activity in the western Indian Ocean: Impact on the economy of Seychelles, report for the year 1997

      Marguerite, M. (Seychelles Fishing AuthorityVictoria, Seychelles, 1998)
      Since the beginning of the industrial tuna fishing activity in the Western Indian Ocean by foreign fishing vessels, Seychelles has benefited substantially, and Port Victoria is now considered the major tuna transshipment port in the region. This activity represents a major source of foreign exchange inflows in the Seychelles's economy not only in terms of earnings from the issue of fishing licenses to foreign fishing vessels to fish in our EEZ, but also in term of these vessels expenditure on local purchases of goods and a number of shore based services which is consumed when these vessels call in port. Through the use of these shore-based services a number of job opportunities are created for Seychellois nationals as well as other spillover effects on the economy. Tuna landed in Port Victoria is also a major source of raw materials input for the local canning factory which in turns enables the creation of hundreds of jobs for Seychellois and inflow of foreign monies in the national economy. For the year 1997, this activity recorded another improvement over the previous year in terms of revenue generated and port activity. The gross revenue generated for 1997 stood at RS 236.2 million, inclusive of license fees, compared to RS 203.1 million for the previous year. The net revenue inclusive of license fees stood at RS 126.2 million compared to RS 120.4 million for 1996.
    • The industrial tuna fishing activity in the western Indian Ocean: Impact on the economy of Seychelles, report for the year 2003

      Marguerite, M. (Seychelles Fishing AuthorityVictoria, Seychelles, 2005)
      Fishing has traditionally played an important role in the socio-economic development of the country, providing an important source of exports and foreign exchange earnings, job creation, government revenue and most of all an important source of animal protein for the population. With the emergence of Port Victoria as a major tuna landing and transshipment center in the region coupled with the country's venture in tuna canning activity, the importance of the fisheries sector has grown even further to establish itself as a major economic activity, an important source of foreign exchange earnings and contributor to the country's wealth generation. The Industrial Tuna Fishing Activity in Seychelles has since its outset been an important source of foreign exchange earnings for the country's economy, representing about 22% of total gross inflows of foreign currency generated by the fisheries sector and associated activities in 2003. This contribution is not only in terms of earnings from the issue of licenses to foreign fishing vessels to fish in our Economic Exclusive Zone, but more importantly in terms of expenditure on local purchases of goods and services effected by these foreign vessels and foreign fishing companies. With Port Victoria being the principal base for these foreign fishing vessels implies that a number of job opportunities are created for Seychellois nationals as well as creating other spill-over effects in the economy. In 2003 an average of 128 stevedores were employed per day for a total of 336 days, resulting in a cumulative 43,000 man days of labour during the year. Moreover, tuna landed in Port Victoria is also a main source of raw material for the local canning factory, which in turns generates further employment for Seychellois nationals and export earnings.
    • The industrial tuna fishing activity in the western Indian Ocean: Impact on the economy of Seychelles, report for the year 2004

      Marguerite, M.A.; Baker, C. (Seychelles Fishing AuthorityVictoria, Seychelles, 2005)
      Fishing has traditionally played an important role in the socio-economic development of the country, providing an important source of exports and foreign exchange earnings, job creation, government revenue and most of all an important source of animal protein for the population. With the emergence of Port Victoria as a major tuna landing and transshipment center in the region coupled with the country's venture in tuna canning activity, the importance of the fisheries sector has grown even further to establish itself as a major economic activity, an important source of foreign exchange earnings and contributor to the country's wealth generation. The Industrial Tuna Fishing Activity in Seychelles has since its outset been an important source of foreign exchange earnings for the country's economy, representing about 29% of total gross inflows of foreign currency generated by the fisheries sector and associated activities in 2004. This contribution is not only in terms of earnings from the issue of licenses to foreign fishing vessels to fish in our Economic Exclusive Zone, but more importantly in terms of expenditure on local purchases of goods and services effected by these foreign vessels and foreign fishing companies based in Port Victoria. With Port Victoria being the principal base for these foreign fishing vessels implies that a number of job opportunities are created for Seychellois nationals as well as creating other spill-over effects in the economy. In 2004 an average of 102 stevedores were employed per day for a total of 337 days, resulting in a cumulative 34,400 man days of labour during the year. Moreover, tuna landed in Port Victoria is also a main source of raw material for the local canning factory, which in turns generates further employment for Seychellois nationals and export earnings. The year 2004 saw a record amount of inflow in earnings. The generated income recorded was 26% higher than the previous year. The level of activity, which relates to the number of calls, number of days spent in port and the volume of landings and transshipment handled in Port Victoria, recorded an overall decrease in 2004. This was mainly due the fact that the level of fishing activity was not as impressive as the previous year.
    • The industrial tuna fishing activity in the Western Indian Ocean: report for the year 1998

      Marguerite, M.A. (Victoria : Seychelles Fishing Authority, 1999)
    • The industrial tuna fishing activity in the Western Indian Ocean: report for the year 2001

      Marguerite, M.A. (Victoria: Seychelles Fishing Authority, 2002-10)