• 17ª Reunión del Comité de la COI sobre Intercambio Internacional de Datos e Información Oceanográficos (IODE-XVII)

      IOC for UNESCO (2003)
      El presente documento comprende un párrafo introductorio y las decisiones adoptadas por el Comité de la COI sobre Intercambio de Datos e Información Oceanográficos en su 17ª reunión, en la forma siguiente: Sección 1: decisiones adoptadas por el Comité sobre IODE respecto de cada punto del orden del día; y Sección 2: resoluciones y recomendaciones aprobadas por el Comité sobre IODE. Este Resumen dispositivo existe en español, francés, inglés y ruso. El informe resumido completo se publica en inglés solamente. El informe se presentará a la Asamblea de la COI en su 22ª reunión, en junio de 2003, para que lo suscriba.
    • 2010 IODE Officers Meeting, IOC Project Office for IODE, Ostend, Belgium, 8-11 March 2010

      IOC Project Office for IODE (IOC Project Office for IODEOstend, 2010)
      Table of Contents 1 OPENING OF THE MEETING 1 2 REVIEW OF THE IODE-XX ACTION SHEET 1 3 DECISIONS OF IOC-XXV AND JCOMM-III RELATED TO IODE 15 4 STATUS OF THE IODE PROGRAMME 15 4.1 IODE Groups of Experts 15 4.1.1 GE-BICH 15 4.1.2 GE-MIM 16 4.1.3 JCOMM/IODE ETDMP 16 4.1.4 GE-OBIS 16 4.2 IODE Global Projects 16 4.2.1 IODE OceanDataPortal 16 4.2.2 IODE/JCOMM Ocean Data Standards 17 4.2.3 IODE OceanTeacher 17 4.2.4 MIM activities (OceanDocs, ASFA, OpenScienceDirectory) 18 4.2.5 DM projects and activities (GTSPP, GOSUD, GODAR, MarineXML, MEDI, ...) 18 4.3 IODE ODINs 19 4.3.1 ODINAFRICA 19 4.3.2 ODINCARSA 19 4.3.3 ODINECET 20 4.3.4 ODINBlackSea 20 4.3.5 ODINWESTPAC 21 4.3.6 ODIN-PIMRIS 21 4.3.7 ODINCINDIO 22 5 INTEGRATION OF OBIS INTO IODE 22 6 IOC STRATEGIC PLAN FOR OCEANOGRAPHIC DATA AND INFORMATION MANAGEMENT 25 7 RENEWAL OF MOU FOR IOC PROJECT OFFICE FOR IODE 26 8 COOPERATION WITH OTHER PROGRAMMES AND ORGANIZATIONS 26 8.1 Cooperation with SCOR on data citation 26 8.2 Cooperation in EU supported projects 26 8.3 Cooperation with ICSU on WDS 26 8.4 Cooperation with JCOMM (other) 28 9 PREPARATIONS FOR IODE-XXI 29 10 IODE 50TH ANNIVERSARY 30 10.1 Conference 30 10.2 Other IODE-50 activities and products 31 10.3 Media 33 11 REVISION OF IODE-XX WORK PLAN AND BUDGET FOR 2010-2011 33 12 ANY OTHER BUSINESS 33 12.1 Secretariat support 33 12.2 Election of IODE Co-Chairs 34 12.3 Secondments to the IOC Project Office for IODE 34 13 ADOPTION OF THE SUMMARY REPORT 34 14 CLOSING OF THE MEETING 34
    • 2012 Annual report

      CGIAR Research Program on Aquatic Agricultural Systems (WorldFishPenang, Malaysia, 2013)
      The CGIAR Research Program on Aquatic Agricultural Systems is a multi-year research initiative launched in July 2011. It is designed to pursue community-based approaches to agricultural research and development that target the poorest and most vulnerable rural households in aquatic agricultural systems. Led by WorldFish, a member of the CGIAR Consortium, the program is partnering with diverse organizations working at local, national and global levels to help achieve impacts at scale.
    • 2012 IODE Officers Meeting, 30 January - 3 February 2012

      IOC Project Office for IODE (IOC Project Office for IODEOstend, 2012)
      1 OPENING OF THE MEETING 1 2 REVIEW OF THE IODE-XXI ACTION SHEET 1 2.1 EVENTS ORGANIZED SINCE IODE-XXI 1 2.2 PROGRESS REPORT ON THE IODE-XXI WORK PLAN 1 2.2.1 Resolutions adopted by IODE-XXI 1 2.2.2 ACTION ITEMS EXTRACTED FROM THE SUMMARY REPORT 2 6.1.1 IODE Group of Experts on Biological and Chemical Data Management and Exchange (GE-BICH) 3 6.1.2 IODE Group of Experts on Marine Information Management (GE-MIM) 3 3 DECISIONS OF IOC-XXVI RELATED TO IODE 13 4 STATUS OF THE IODE PROGRAMME 13 4.1 IODE GROUPS OF EXPERTS 13 4.1.1 GE-BICH 13 4.1.2 GE-MIM 13 4.1.3 JCOMM/IODE ETDMP 14 4.1.4 GE-OBIS 15 4.2 IODE GLOBAL PROJECTS 15 4.2.1 IODE OceanDataPortal 15 4.2.2 IODE/JCOMM Ocean Data Standards 17 4.2.3 IODE OceanTeacher 18 4.2.4 MIM activities (OceanDocs, ASFA, OpenScienceDirectory) 19 4.2.5 DM projects and activities (GTSPP, GOSUD, GODAR, MarineXML, MEDI, .) 19 4.3 IODE ODINs 19 4.3.1 ODINAFRICA 19 4.3.2 ODINCARSA 20 4.3.3 ODINECET 20 4.3.4 ODINBlackSea 20 4.3.5 ODINWESTPAC 21 4.3.6 ODIN-PIMRIS 21 4.3.7 ODINCINDIO 21 4.3.8 General observations related to ODINs: 21 5 INTEGRATION OF OBIS INTO IODE 22 6 STRATEGIC ISSUES 22 6.1 INTER-SESSIONAL WORKING GROUP FOR UPDATING THE IOC STRATEGIC PLAN FOR OCEANOGRAPHIC DATA AND INFORMATION EXCHANGE (2012-2015) 22 6.2 INTER-SESSIONAL WORKING GROUP TO IDENTIFY A SET OF QUALITY MANAGEMENT CRITERIA FOR IODE NODCS TAKING INTO ACCOUNT THOSE DEFINED FOR THE WDS 23 6.3 INVITATION TO ADOPT ICAN (INTERNATIONAL COASTAL ATLAS NETWORK) INTO IODE 23 7 RENEWAL OF MOU FOR IOC PROJECT OFFICE FOR IODE 24 8 COOPERATION WITH OTHER PROGRAMMES AND ORGANIZATIONS 24 8.1 COOPERATION WITH SCOR AND MBLWHOI ON DATA CITATION 24 8.2 COOPERATION WITH ICSU ON WDS 24 8.3 COOPERATION WITH JCOMM (OTHER) 24 8.4 COOPERATION OF IODE IN IMARINE 25 8.5 COOPERATION OF IODE IN GEO/GEOSS 25 8.6 COOPERATION OF IODE IN GEOWOW 26 8.7 COOPERATION OF IODE IN SEADATANET2 26 8.8 COOPERATION WITH EUMETSAT 26 8.9 COOPERATION WITH POGO 26 8.10 NEW OPPORTUNITIES 27 9 PREPARATIONS FOR IOC/EC 27 10 PREPARATIONS FOR IODE-XXII 28 11 REVISION OF IODE-XXI WORK PLAN AND BUDGET FOR 2012-2013 28 12 ANY OTHER BUSINESS 28 12.1 SECRETARIAT SUPPORT 28 12.2 ELECTION OF IODE CO-CHAIRS 29 13 ADOPTION OF THE SUMMARY REPORT 29 14 CLOSING OF THE MEETING 29
    • The 2nd International Indian Ocean Expedition (IIOE-2): Motivating New Exploration in a Poorly Understood Basin.

      Hood, Raleigh; Urban, Edward R.; McPhaden, Michael J.; Su, Danielle; Raes, Eric (Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography (ASLO), 2016)
      The Indian Ocean remains one of the most poorly sampled and overlooked regions of the world ocean. Today, more than 25% of the world’s population lives in the Indian Ocean region and the population of most Indian Ocean rim nations is increasing rapidly. These increases in population are giving rise to multiple stressors in both coastal and open ocean environments. Combined with warming and acidification due to global climate change, these regional stressors are resulting in loss of biodiversity in the Indian Ocean and also changes in the phenology and biogeography of many species. These pressures have given rise to an urgent need to understand and predict changes in the Indian Ocean, but the measurements that are needed to do this are still lacking. In response, SCOR, IOC, and IOGOOS have stimulated a second International Indian Ocean Expedition (IIOE-2). An international Science Plan and an Implementation Strategy for IIOE-2 have been developed, the formulation of national plans is well underway in several countries, and new research initiatives are being motivated
    • 2nd Joint GOSUD/SAMOS Workshop, U.S.Coast Guard Base, Seattle, Washington, 10-12 June 2008.

      IOC for UNESCO (UNESCOParis, 2008)
      On 10-12 June 2008, the NOAA Climate Observation Division sponsored the 2nd Joint Global Ocean Surface Underway Data (GOSUD)/Shipboard Automated Meteorological and Oceanographic System (SAMOS) Workshop in Seattle, WA, USA. The workshop focused on the ongoing collaboration between GOSUD and SAMOS and addressing the needs of the research and operational community for highquality underway oceanographic and meteorological observations from ships. The SAMOS initiative is working to improve access to calibrated, quality-controlled, surface marine meteorological data collected in-situ by automated instrumentation on research vessels (primarily) and select merchant ships. GOSUD is an IODE project which focuses on the collection, quality evaluation, and distribution of near surface ocean parameters (for the moment mainly salinity and sea temperature) from vessels. The workshop organizing committee (Shawn Smith, Mark Bourassa, Loic Petit de la Villéon, David Forcucci, and Phillip McGillivary) brought together a panel consisting of operational and research scientists, educators, marine technicians, and private sector and government representatives to address several key topics (see below). Participants from the U.S. government represented NOAA (AOML, COD, ESRL, NDBC, NODC, NWS, PMC, and PMEL) and the United States Coast Guard. CIRES, LUMCON, Florida State University, Moss Landing Marine Laboratories, Oregon State University, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, Stony Brook University, and the Universities of Delaware, Maryland, Miami, and Rhode Island represented the United States university community. A significant international presence included representatives from the Bureau of Meteorology (Australia); Environment Canada (Canada); LEGOS, IFREMER, and Meteo France (France); the University of Hamburg (Germany); the Directorate of Civil Aviation (Kuwait); the Nigerian Institute for Oceanography and Marine Research (Nigeria), University of Santiago de Compostela (Spain); and the NOCS (UK). Educators were present from ACT, IIRP, and MATE. Finally, Earth and Space Research, the RMR Company, and two consultants represented the private sector. The workshop was comprised of invited and contributed talks, poster presentations, plenary discussions, and the SAMOS and GOSUD technical working group meetings. Broad topic areas included new opportunities for international collaboration, emerging technologies, scientific application of underway measurements, and data and metadata issues. New sessions included a technician’s round-table discussion and developing educational initiatives. Scientific discussion centered around the need for high-quality meteorological and thermosalinograph observations to support satellite calibration and validation, ocean data assimilation, polar studies, air-sea flux estimation, and improving analyses of precipitation, carbon, and radiation. Determining the regions of the ocean and observational parameters necessary to achieve operational and research objectives requires input by the scientific user community. The CLIVAR community should be one way to approach the scientific community. This input will allow SAMOS and GOSUD to target their limited resources on vessels operating in the high priority regions. The vessel operators and marine technicians were very supportive of the activities of SAMOS and GOSUD. They requested a clear set of guidelines for parameters to measure, routine monitoring activities, and calibration schedules. The operators also desire additional routine feedback on data flow and data quality. A clear need for training and educational material was noted by the technical community. The dissemination of best practices guides for existing techs and pre-cruise training for new techs were suggested. The result of the workshop was a series of action items (Appendix A) and seven recommendations.
    • 3WSFC: A time for transformation

      Chuenpagdee, Ratana; Kerezi, Vesna (2019)
      The voices of small-scale fishers and civil society organizations were loud and clear at the 3rd World Small-Scale Fisheries Congress. By all accounts, the past ten years have been truly exceptional for small-scale fisheries. One of the highlights is the adoption of the Voluntary Guidelines for Securing Sustainable Small-Scale Fisheries in the Context of Food Security and Poverty Eradication (SSF Guidelines) by FAO member states in 2014. As the first international instrument specifically designed for small-scale fisheries, the SSF Guidelines give the much-needed visibility to this important sector, calling all parties to promote small-scale fisheries sustainability through a human-rights based approach. The SSF Guidelines set off waves of excitement and optimism about the new era for small-scale fisheries.
    • The 50th Anniversary of the International Indian Ocean Expedition: a Prospectus and Charge for an Organizing Committee.

      Hood, Raleigh; D'Adamo, Nick (Perth Programme Office in support of the IOC of UNESCOPerth, Australia, 2013)
    • A bio-socioeconomic model for the management of the small pelagic fishery in northwest Peninsular Malaysia

      Tai, S.Y. (1993)
      The article was extracted from the author's dissertation entitled "Management of small pelagic fisheries on the northwest coast of Peninsular Malaysia: a bio-socioeconomic simulation analysis". The basic structure and uses of this simulation model are presented here.
    • A briefing on aquaculture in watershed development

      Network of Aquaculture Centres in Asia-Pacific (NACA); Support to Regional Aquatic Resources Management (STREAM) (Support to Regional Aquatic Resources Management (STREAM)Bangkok, Thailand, 2006)
      (PDF contains 2 pages)
    • A briefing on building concensus

      Network of Aquaculture Centres in Asia-Pacific (NACA); Support to Regional Aquatic Resources Management (STREAM) (Support to Regional Aquatic Resources Management (STREAM)Bangkok, Thailand, 2005)
      (PDF contains 2 pages)
    • A briefing on development and management of aquaculture-based fisheries enhancements

      Network of Aquaculture Centres in Asia-Pacific (NACA); Support to Regional Aquatic Resources Management (STREAM) (Support to Regional Aquatic Resources Management (STREAM)Bangkok, Thailand, 2005)
      (PDF contains 2 pages)
    • A briefing on livelihoods approaches in fisheries and aquaculture

      Network of Aquaculture Centres in Asia-Pacific (NACA); Support to Regional Aquatic Resources Management (STREAM) (Support to Regional Aquatic Resources Management (STREAM)Bangkok, Thailand, 2005)
      (PDF contains 2 pages)
    • A characterization of community fish refuge typologies in rice field fisheries ecosystems

      Brooks, A.; Kim, M.; Sieu, C.; Sean, V.; Try, V. (WorldFishPenang, Malaysia, 2015)
      In rural Cambodia, fish is a source of food and income to millions of people. However, there has been a real threat to fish populations in natural wetlands due to the degradation of aquatic biodiversity and habitat, illegal fishing, increase of population and demand for fish, and the use of harmful pesticides for agriculture. The Rice Field Fisheries Enhancement Project (RFFEP) seeks to rebuild and protect the fish populations through innovative methods. The project works with communities to sustainably strengthen the rice field fisheries near their villages by improving protected habitats called "community fish refuges". This handbook characterizes rice field fisheries that are connected to community fish refuges. Community fish refuges are designated fish conservation areas promoted by the Fisheries Administration of the Royal Cambodian Government. It also examines the characteristics of rain-fed rice field ecosystems that are connected to community fish refuges in order to further refine descriptive criteria and better understand potential benefits and management strategies.