• South & West Cumberland Fisheries Advisory Committee 16th October, 1978

      North West Water Authority (North West Water AuthorityWarrington, UK, 0300)
      This is the report from the South and West Cumberland Fisheries Advisory Committee meeting, which was held on the 16th October, 1978. It covers information on fisheries income and expenditure, the study of salmon propagation in England and Wales, work on the future programme of fisheries work, keep nets, and the drought order for the reduction of compensation water from Lake Ennerdale. It also covers the report by the area fisheries officer on fishing activities including river conditions and fishing, migratory fish movements, and an update on Holmwrangle hatchery. The report also looks at stocking numbers of salmon and sea trout in various rivers, predator counts for various rivers, fish mortalities and fish disease.The Fisheries Advisory Committee was part of the Regional Water Authorities, in this case the North West Water Authority. This preceded the Environment Agency which came into existence in 1996.
    • Central Area Fisheries Advisory Committee 31st March, 1982

      North West Water Authority (North West Water AuthorityWarrington, UK, 0375)
      This is the report from the Central Area Fisheries Advisory Committee meeting, which was held on the 31st March, 1982. It includes information on the River Leven smolt rearing scheme, the annual report on match fishing at Skerton and Mitton fisheries, and the report by the area fisheries officer on fisheries activites from September 1981 to January 1982. The report covers information on river conditions and fishing, migratory fish movements, an update on the work at Middleton hatchery, Salmon cages on the Leven and Langcliffe hatchery. It also includes information on fish disease, fish mortalities, management work and monthly salmon and sea trout catches for rod, line, nets and fixed engines for the 1981 season. The Fisheries Advisory Committee was part of the Regional Water Authorities, in this case the North West Water Authority. This preceded the Environment Agency which came into existence in 1996.
    • Algae from the inland ice of Greenland. [Translation from: Kongl.Vetenskaps-Akademiens Forhandlingar 1871(2) 293-296, 1871.]

      Berggren, S. (Freshwater Biological AssociationWindermere, UK, 1871)
      On the large inland ice cover of Greenland, where the temperature even during the short summer, falls below freezing some time during the daily 24 hours, it is still possible to find organic life. The author found in melted ice water several species of algae on his ”walk” in the latter part of July 1870. The article describes the finds and tries to identify the algae to family level.
    • Mastigophora and Rhizopoda found in saline lakes Weissovo and Repnoie (near Slaviansk). Selected passages describing Ochromonas species and Pedinella. [Translation of: Trudy Obshch.Ispyt.Prir.imp.khar'kov.Univ. 21 119-140, 1888]

      Vysotskii, A. V. (Freshwater Biological AssociationWindermere, UK, 1888)
      This translation includes selected passages of a longer paper on Mastigophora and Rhizopoda found in saline lakes Weissovo and Repnoie. The translation focuses on describing taxonomy and morphology of Ochromonas species and Pedinella. Plates and figures of the original paper are not included in the translation.
    • Plan of the Lune Fishery District. Map of District sealed by the Board of agriculture & fisheries

      Lune Board of Conservators (J.T. SandersonLancaster, UK, 1909)
      Historic map of the River Lune Fishery District.
    • Some aspects of the ecology of the limnoplankton, with special reference to the phytoplankton. [Translation from: Svensk Botanisk Tidskrift 13(2) 129-163, 1919.]

      Naumann, E. (Freshwater Biological AssociationWindermere, UK, 1919)
      This paper tries to develop more generally some fundamental bases for the ecological study of freshwater plankton. A special attention is given to the phytoplankton associations which can be separated out and made into groups according to their dependence upon changing environments. Plankton formations in different types of water bodies (ponds, lakes and rivers) are studied.
    • Some observations on the temporal variations of size of copepods and some answers to questions on their biology. [Translation from: Internationale Revue der Gesamten Hydrobiologie und Hydrographie 17 99-114, 1927.]

      Rzoska, J. (Freshwater Biological AssociationWindermere, UK, 1927)
      Until now observations on the temporal variation of size of freshwater copepods have not provided much information. Other observers only mention in passing this or that phenomenon from which it is possible to deduct termporal variations. In this study Cyclops strenuus s.l., a freshwater species of fairly wide distribution, is studied in two water bodies. The author studies the systematic, placing of inhabitants described as C. strenuus Fischer in both locations, their annual life cycle, and their annual size variations.
    • Key to the identification of the naupliar instars of the genus Cyclops. [Translation from: Arb.biol.Stat.Kossino 5 31-39, 1927. ]

      Amelina, L. (Freshwater Biological AssociationWindermere, UK, 1927)
      This is a short excerpt of the original paper giving the key to the identification of the naupliar instars of the genus Cyclops.
    • Key to the identification of the naupliar instars of the genus Cyclops. [Translation from: Arb.biol.Stat.Kossino 5 31-39, 1927.]

      Amelina, L. (Freshwater Biological AssociationWindermere, UK, 1927)
      This is a short excerpt of the original paper giving the key to the identification of the naupliar instars of the genus Cyclops.
    • Observations on the physiological development of trout eggs [Translation from: Roux. Arch. f. Entwicklungsmechanik der Organismen, 114. 771, 1929]

      Svetlov, P. (Freshwater Biological AssociationWindermere, UK, 1929)
      The osmotic pressure of the perivitelline fluid and the yolk of trout (Salmo trutta) eggs were measured separately by the Drucker-Schrein method. The permeability of the egg membrane and the variations in the osmotic pressure of the eggs when placed in salt solutions were also investigated.
    • Collins Weir in River Wyre 1935

      Environment Agency North West (Environment Agency North West, 1935)
      Collins Weir in River Wyre, North West England, UK. Photo taken on the 7th of September 1935. This photo is part of a Photo Album that includes pictures from 1935 to 1954.
    • The floods of the Lake District - Part I

      Hudlestone, F (River Derwent Catchment BoardPenrith, UK, 1935)
      This report summarises the annual rainfall of the River Derwent catchment area and examines the floods of 1931 and 1932. The author uses data from the Meteorological Office to examine if the floods were extraordinary and takes into account local lakes in reducing the magnitude of the flood. Areas that are presented in more detail are Bassenthwaite Lake, Thirlmere, Cockermouth, Keswick, Newlands and Coledale Beck. (PDF contains 38 pages)
    • The chemical budget of a lake

      Mortimer, C.H. (Freshwater Biological AssociationAmbleside, UK, 1938)
      A progress report on research undertaken on the chemical budget of a lake, outlining the importance of nitrogen and phosphorus in governing the production of life in freshwater. The report uses the Rivers Brathay and Leven, which flow into Windermere, as examples. The report also refers to the Rivers Rothay, Troutbeck and Cunsey. A table is including which shows the monthly average nitrate content (mg per litre) of the River Brathey and River Leven for 1937 into 1938. The report also includes a figure showing Windermere lake levels, discharge and rainfall during 1937. It also briefly considers possible anthropogenic influences on water quality.
    • The culture of algae and its applications

      Rosenberg, M. (Freshwater Biological AssociationAmbleside, UK, 1938)
      An article explaining how the methods and results from the time spent by the author culturing algae can be applied to other algal investigations. The work by the author found that physiological requirements differ widely among algae belonging to different systematic groups. Details are given of the results of a series of experiments which were undertaken in solutions with similar proporties to some natural waters in the Lake District. Reference is made to a paper under preparation at that time containing data on phytoplankton studied in the field within the Lake District during 1937. Reference is also made to Loch Leven and the affects of bluegreen alga on the number of trout caught weekly during 1937.
    • Progress on the salmon investigation

      Allen, K.R. (Freshwater Biological AssociationAmbleside, UK, 1938)
      An article detailing some of the conclusions of the salmon investigation undertaken by the author, on the River Eden and its tributaries, for the previous few years. It is proposed that seasonal changes in young salmon growth are related to water temperature variation. A figure is included showing length of fish compared to the average temperature of water in the River Eden over a two year duration. The article describes comparative work undertaken to date between three streams within the Thurso watershed and the River Eden. A table is included showing the average size of fish in each of the watercourses compared. Laboratory experiments on the effects of temperature on young salmon are outlined, as well as investigative work undertaken into the realtionship between fish scales and fish length.
    • Bathymetric surveys and lake deposits

      Mortimer, C.H.; Worthington, E.B. (Freshwater Biological AssociationAmbleside, UK, 1938)
      A progress report on the bathymetric survey of Windereme undertaken in June 1937 by the Hydrographic Department of the Admiralty. The brief article outlines the background of the surveying process as well as the initial effectiveness of the survey work. There is a brief background to the geomorphological processes which were involved in shaping the Lake District topography, as well as some explanation of previous studies undertaken in the area. The report includes a figure showing the cross sections of lake beds and a figure detailing a core from the bottom deposits of Windermere.
    • Invertebrate animals of the Lake District

      Macan, T.T. (Freshwater Biological AssociationAmbleside, UK, 1938)
    • Changes in the phytoplankton

      Rosenberg, M. (Freshwater Biological AssociationAmbleside, UK, 1939)
      An article discussing changes observed in phytoplankton of the Lake District. An overview is given of previous phytoplankton studies undertaken in the area, detailing some changes found in various waterbodies. Water quality changes in Lake Windermere are mentioned, including the gradual increase of dissolved organic matter (DOM), believed to be caused by the increase of sewage to the lake. The lakes in the Alps are given as an example of a similar anthropogenic pollution scenario. The treatment of a Lake District tarn with bone meal is described. The article goes on to discuss the composition of plankton throughout the year under a variety of climatic conditions. A figure shows seasonal variation in the consistuents of phytoplankton in Windermere (north basin).
    • The growth of brown trout

      Worthington, E.B.; Swynnerton, G.H. (Freshwater Biological AssociationAmbleside, UK, 1939)
      An article discussing the factors affecting the rate of growth of brown trout, detailing the research udnertaken at Wray Castle, designed to clarify the influencing factors in different waters and investigate what would be required to increase their size. The article considers factors such as alkalinity, total hardness, the presence of coarse fish in the waterbodies and competition for food. Previous work undertaken on brown trout in Ireland by other authors is reviewed. A figure showing average growth rate of brown trout in five lakes, as determined from their scales (Lough Derg, Windermere, Loch Leven, Ullswater, Haweswater).
    • Faunistic studies

      Macan, T.T.; Hynes, B.N. (Freshwater Biological AssociationAmbleside, UK, 1939)
      An update on the work undertaken by the authors, Macan and Hynes, over the past year. Macan provides details of additional work undertaken since his publication of faunistic work on adult animals, including details on additional field data, further developments of the conclusions intially drawn and further comparisons with fauna of the highlands of Scotland. Two histograms are provided showing succession of Corixidae in two separate waterbodies. Habitat conditions are also discussed for this species and a number of locations are mentioned including, Blelham Tarn, Derwentwater and Rusland Moss. An update on stonefly work undertaken by Hynes is provided, specifically stomach contents of nymphs and habitat preference. Details are also given of aquatic insects being breed by the staff for research.