• 1994 annual report on fisheries in the North west incorporating the annual summary of fishery statistics.

      National Rivers Authority North West Region (Environment Agency North WestWarrington, UK, 1995)
      This report provides national and regional developments, statistics on fisheries finance, including income and expenditure, salmon and sea trout catches, including rod and line, commercial catches, and angler log book returns, monitoring and special projects, including salmon microtagging, salmon egg survival in Swanside Beck, and fish stock assessments, one with hydroacoustics, and one of surveys of different areas in Cumbria. The appendix includes a summary of fish statistics for 1994.
    • 1995 annual report on fisheries in the North west incorporating the annual summary of fishery statistics.

      Environment Agency North West Region (Environment Agency North WestWarrington, UK, 1996)
      This fisheries report summarises national and regional developments focussing on the North West region of the Environment Agency. The North West region covers around 14,000 square km, from Cheshire in the south to its northern border with Scotland. The report provides statistics on fisheries finance, including income and expenditure, salmon and sea trout catches, including rod and line and net catches, and special projects, including fish stock assessments, and surveys. The appendix includes a summary of fish statistics for 1995.
    • 1998 annual report on fisheries in the North west incorporating the annual summary of fishery statistics.

      Environment Agency North West Region (Environment Agency North WestWarrington, UK, 1999)
      This fisheries report summarises national and regional developments focussing on the North West region of the Environment Agency. The North West region covers around 14,000 square km, from Cheshire in the south to its northern border with Scotland. This report provides national and regional developments,and special projects, including fish stocking assessments, radiotracking, and Cumbria surveys. Salmon and sea trout catches, including rod and line and net catches appear in the appendix.
    • 1999 annual report on fisheries in the North west incorporating the annual summary of fishery statistics

      Environment Agency North West Region (Environment Agency North WestWarrington, UK, 2000)
      This fisheries report summarises national and regional developments focussing on the North West region of the Environment Agency. The North West region covers around 14,000 square km, from Cheshire in the south to its northern border with Scotland. The report provides statistics on fisheries finance, including salmon and sea trout catches, including rod and line and net catches, and special projects, including fish stock assessments, radiotracking, and various surveys. The appendix includes a summary of fish statistics for 1999.
    • 2000 annual report on fisheries in the North West

      Environment Agency North West Region (Environment Agency North WestWarrington, UK, 2001)
      This fisheries report summarises developments of the year 2000 in the North West Region of the Environment Agency. The North West region covers around 14,000 square km, from Cheshire in the south to its northern border with Scotland. The report provides statistics on fisheries finance, including salmon and sea trout catches, including rod and line and net catches, and special projects, including fish stock assessments, radiotracking, and various surveys. The appendix includes a summary of fish statistics for 2000.
    • 2001 annual report on fisheries in the North West

      Environment Agency North West Region (Environment Agency North West RegionWarrington, UK, 2002)
      This is the 2001 annual report on fisheries in the North West produced by the Environment Agency North West in 2002. This report has four main aims: to inform the Agency’s customers of developments within the Agency, to inform the Agency’s customers of the work carried out by the Agency, to publish information on the performance of fisheries and the Fisheries Department, and to be a source of future reference. The fisheries service is funded in the main by a mixture of rod licence income and government grant-in-aid. The latter has declined substantially since the mid 1990’s and we are increasingly reliant on licence income to fund fisheries work. The environment agency had managed to use some of this money to fund their Urban Fisheries Development Programme, (UFDP). This is aimed at delivering new or improved fisheries in areas where demand for fishing is high, but where available fisheries are few in number or of poor quality. This work is dependent on good co-operation with local angling clubs, councils and other interests.
    • 20lb Pike from River Lune transferred by two men to Roan Head

      Environment Agency North West
      Two men with a 20 lb. pike from Lune being transferred to Roan Head, North West England, UK. This photo is part of a Photo Album that includes pictures from 1935 to 1954.
    • A bibliography of samplers for benthic invertebrates

      Elliott, J.M.; Tullet, P.A. (Freshwater Biological AssociationAmbleside, UK, 1978)
      This annotated bibliography covers literature to the end of November 1977, and includes references to samplers that could be used for the rapid removal of benthic invertebrates from natural substrata of rivers and streams. Marine samplers which have been, or could be, used in freshwater. Coverage of Russian literature is incomplete, although a selection of recent and important references are included. The references are arranged under the following headings, Reviews; Nets and quadrat samplers; Scoops, shovels and dredges; Grabs; Corers; Suction and air-lift samplers; Electroshocking samplers; Efficiencies and comparisons; and Samplers from catalogues. There is an index to samplers (by the common name) and an author index.
    • A bibliography of the rivers North Tyne, Wear, Tees and Swale

      Horne, J.E.M. (Freshwater Biological AssociationAmbleside, UK, 1977)
      This bibliography covers published and unpublished work on the freshwater sections of the rivers North Tyne, Wear, Tees and Swale, their catchment areas and their tributaries. 393 references are included in the bibliography.
    • A bibliography of works for the identification of freshwater invertebrates in the British Isles

      Armitage, P.D.; Furse, M.T.; Wright, J.F. (Freshwater Biological AssociationAmbleside, UK, 1979)
      This bibliography covers the literature up to the end of 1978. The criteria used in the selection of references were that they should aid identification of invertebrates directly; thus, works solely concerned with the taxonomy of a particular group are in general omitted unless they contain a key. Some check-lists are however included where they give current nomenclature. The references are arranged alphabetically within each group and deal mainly with macro-invertebrates but include available keys to some microscopic invertebrates. Internal parasites and hymenopterous parasitoids are omitted. For insects the life stages to which the key applies are given where this is not clear in the reference. A number of keys to non-aquatic stages have been included in the hope that they may prove useful in certain circumstances. In addition, under a general head, latest check-lists are referred to together with bibliographies of algal keys and a guide for the identification of British water plants.
    • A biologically active peptide in the skin of lampreys (Eudontomyzon danfordi vladykovi). [Translation from: Z.Naturforsch. (B), 26(10), 1021-1023, 1971. ]

      Fischer, G.; Albert, W. (Freshwater Biological AssociationWindermere, UK, 1971)
      In recent years interest in the production and description of kinin-type substances has been greatly intensified. So, for example, bradykinin, phyllokinin, physalaemin, ranatensin and caerulein could be extracted from the skin of amphibians as well as. eledoisin out of the salivary glands of Eledon moschata. An examination of lampreys seemed to us particularly profitable in the search for the incidence of further kinins. Ammocoetes of different sizes and also adults of both sexes of the species Eudontomyzon danfordi vladykovi were studied in this research. This species is found in many tributaries of the Danube. Skin extracts were tested on on isolated rat uterus, rat duodenum, guinea pig ileum and rabbit jejunum, further tests were done in order to determine a peptide character of the biologically active substance.
    • A brief history of the scientific study of tropical African inland waters

      Talling, Jack (2006)
      An account is given of a study of African tropical waters, drawing on the personal experiences of the author. Reviewing developments since 1900, the author examines the way in which research has developed and the influence the changes in the policitcal map of Africa, in particular the change from colonial rule, has had on research.
    • A case of development of the parthenogenetic embryo in the ovary of Moina macrocopa Straus (Crustacea, Cladocera). [Translation from: Vest. Zool., Kiev 4, p. 86, 1971. ]

      Makrushin, A. V. (Freshwater Biological AssociationWindermere, UK, 1971)
      In a survey of histological preparations of several hundreds of Moina macrocopa Straus , one specimen was discovered, in the left ovary of which was found a parthenogenetic embryo. The short article includes an illustration of a transverse section of parthenogenetic female of Moina macrocopa.
    • A chemical survey of standing waters in south-east England, with reference to acidification and eutrophication

      Bennion, Helen; Harriman, Ron; Battarbee, Rick (1997)
      This study looks at the distribution and magnitude of acidification and eutrophication in south-east England where there are no natural lakes but a large number of shallow artificial ponds. The study area is defined as the region lying within a 100 km radius of central London but excluding the area within the M25 motorway. Water samples were taken from 120 sites between mid-January and the end of February 1990, with a subsequent monthly survey of a subset of 31 of these waters. Twelve chemical variables were measured in the laboratory using standard techniques. PH values for the full dataset ranged from 3.2 to 8.4, although the majority of sites had pH values in the range 7.0 to 8.5; only five sites had a pH of less than 6.0. The five low pH sites expectedly had low alkalinities and are the only sites with values below 0.1 meq per litre. Concentrations of calcium, sodium, potassium, magnesium, chloride, sulphate and nitrate had normal distributions. The majority of sites had total phosphorus concentrations in the range 25 to 200 mu g per litre, although 10 sites had concentrations above 400 mu g per litre. The low number of acid sites suggests that surface water acidity is not a widespread regional problem in south-east England. However the survey shows that a large number of standing waters in the region have high total phosphorus and nitrate concentrations, and 89% may be considered moderately to considerably eutrophic.
    • A coarse fish close season on canals. Paper in evidence to the review of fisheries policy and legislation. Paper number: EA-12

      Environment Agency (Environment Agency, 1998)
      This paper gives the results of the Environment Agency's research into the canal close season to the Salmon and Freshwater Fisheries Review Group. It presents the findings of the research, explains why the research was undertaken and how it relates to the Agency's duties.The background for this report includes that angling representative bodies have long argued that the existing situation in which somecanals have a close season and others do not, is unsatisfactory.
    • A comparative survey of the fish populations of 10 West-Midlands meres of SSSI status

      Holland, R.K.; Goldspink, C.R. (Metropolitan UniversityManchester, UK, 1995)
      This is a comparative survey of the Fish Populations of 10 West-Midlands Mere of Site of Special Scientific Interest Status. The meres of the Shropshire-Cheshire plain (West Midlands) comprise over 60 water bodies. Water quality in the meres ranges from naturally eutrophic to nutrient limited and some of them have received Site of Special Scientific Interest status (SSSIs). This survey was commissioned in order to obtain quantitative information on the fish fauna of selected SSSIs and evaluate the likely impact of fish on other species within the community. The current survey was concerned with 10 of the West Midlands’ meres, a cross section of sites was selected. Sites were widely distributed from Marton Pool in the south-western part of Shropshire to Tabley moat in Chesire. Meres varied in size, depth and nutrient status. All were to be sampled using the methods outlined. The report is divided into different sections for clarity and ease of reference. The materials and methods section provides an outline of the location and status of each mere and information on known fish species present. The results were considered individually and comparatively, relative abundance of fish, species present, their diet, sex, age, parasite burdens and growth. Inter-site comparisons were made using information derived from echo-soundings, growth rate, diet, and species abundance for each site. The final section will be in the form of a general discussion, comparative information from longer term studies, conclusions and recommendations.
    • A contribution to the algal flora of the Kola Peninsula [Translation from: Trudy Institut Botaniki Trudy Institut Botaniki Kharkivskii. Univ Vol. 4, pp. 53-76, 1941]

      Korshikov, A.A. (Freshwater Biological AssociationWindermere, UK, 1941)
      During recent years in connection with the industrialisation of the Kola Peninsula, the study of this district in the botanical respect, in particular the study of the microflora of various bodies of water, began to advance markedly. This article describes the algal flora of the Kola Peninsula. Morphological descriptions are given for three Tetraspora: Tetraspora simplex, Tetraspora tenera, Tetraspora imperfecta. Chlorophysema aduata is also described, and short descriptions of further algae found in the Kola Peninsula are given.
    • A contribution to the knowledge of the skin albuminose cells of Torpedo ocellata Raf [Riv.Istochim.norm.pat. 8 411-416, 1962]

      Celada, M.; De Paoli, A. M. (Freshwater Biological AssociationWindermere, UK, 1979)
      Glandular cells, other than the mucous cells, have been described in the skin of various groups of fish (Teleosts, Ganoids, Selachii) and they have been called 'albuminose' by various authors. The authors propose to study the albuminose cells in the skin of Torpedo ocellata Raf. from a histochemical point of view. The albuminose cells have a complex morphological structure and a correspondingly complicated histochemical make-up. One must treat them as an example of cell with secretions of a particular type, which must and will be better incorporated when more is known of characteristics existent in other species.
    • A control of gas-vacuolate cyanobacteria

      Walsby, A.E.; Sutcliffe, D.W.; Jones, J.G. (Freshwater Biological AssociationAmbleside, UK, 1992)
      The cyanobacteria that cause problems in water supply are principally the colonial forms that are buoyed up by gas vesicles. The success of these organisms is due, in part, to their gas vesicles, which enable them to perform vertical migrations or to maintain themselves in the euphotic zone. The gas vesicles are also the root cause of the problems. In calm periods they cause the cyanobacteria to float to the water surface forming noxious scums, and they may prevent the colonies from sedimenting in water treatment plants. Gas vesicles are hollow, gas-filled structures; they are rigid but can be collapsed by the application of pressure. Their critical collapse pressure is influenced by their dimensions, which vary in different organisms. Gas vesicles are formed by the assembly of two types of protein, which determine their mechanical and physical properties. Methods for collapsing gas vesicles in natural populations of cyanobacteria will be considered. They may have application to the control of cyanobacteria in water supply.
    • A decade of monitoring and management of freshwater algae, in particular Cyanobacteria, in England and Wales

      Krokowski, Jan; Jamieson, Jane (2002)
      Although the toxicity of cyanobacteria has been known for many years, cyanobacteria-related problems in the UK were generally limited in frequency. However, this all changed and became of national concern following the exceptional environmental conditions in the autumn of 1989, when widespread cyanobacterial blooms and scums developed in fresh waters. This paper summarises the Environment Agency's monitoring programme for freshwater algae since 1991 and describes the actions the Environment Agency has taken as a result of the monitoring data.