Recent Submissions

  • Fisheries statistical bulletin, Kainji Lake, Nigeria, 1999

    Nigerian-German (GTZ) Kainji Lake Fisheries Promotion Project, New Bussa, Niger State (Nigeria) (Nigerian-German (GTZ) Kainji Lake Fisheries Promotion ProjectNew Bussa, Nigeria, 2000)
    A tabulated summary is presented of the main Lake Kainji fisheries data collected to date (1999) by the Nigerian-German Kainji Lake Fisheries Promotion Project, together with a current overview of the fishery. The data are given under the following sections: 1) Fishing localities and types; 2) Frame survey data; 3) Number of licensed fishermen by state; 4) Mesh size distribution; 5) Fishing net characteristics; 6) Fish yield; 7) Average monthly CPUE by gear type; 8)Average monthly fishing activity by gear type; 9) Total annual fishing effort by gear type; 10) Total annual value of fish landed by gear type; 11) Trends of the total yield by gear type. (PDF contains 34 pages)
  • The nutritional status of pre-school children, Kainji Lake communities, Nigeria: a follow-up survey

    Adu, F.A. (Nigerian-German (GTZ) Kainji Lake Fisheries Promotion ProjectNew Bussa, Nigeria, 1999)
    This survey was carried out to provide the Kainji Lake Fisheries Promotion Project (KLFPP), whose overall goal is the improvement of the standard of living of fishing communities around Kainji Lake, Nigeria, managing the fisheries on a sustainable basis, with follow-up data for long-term monitoring and evaluation of the overall project goal. A similar survey, conducted in 1996, provided the baseline against which data from the current survey was evaluated. In a cross-sectional survey, anthropometric data was collected from 576 children aged 3-60 months in 282 fisherfolk households around the southern sector of Kainji Lake, Nigeria. In addition, data was collected on the nutritional status and fertility of the mothers, vaccination coverage of children and child survival indicators. For control purposes, 374 children and 181 mothers from non-fishing households around Kainji Lake were likewise covered by the survey. A standardised questionnaire was used to collect relevant data, while anthropometric measurements were made using appropriate equipment. Data compilation and analysis was carried out with a specially designed Microsoft Access application, using NCHS reference data for the analysis of anthropometric measurements. Statistical significance testing was done using EPI-INFO" software. The results of the follow-up survey indicate a slight increase in the percentage of stunted pre-school children in fishing households around Kainji Lake, from 40% in 1996 to 41% in 1999. This increase is however not statistically significant (p= 0.704). Over the same period, the percentage of stunted children in non-fishing households increased from 37% to 39% (p= 0.540), which is also not statistically significant. Likewise, there were no statistically significant differences between the 1996 and 1999 results for the prevalence of either wasted or underweight children in fishing households. The same applies to children from non-fishing households. In addition, vaccination coverage remains very low while infant and child mortality rates continue to be extremely high with about 1 in 5 children dying before their fifth birthday. There has been no perceptible and lasting improvement in the standard of living of fishing households over the course of the second project phase as indicated by the persistently high prevalence of stunting. The situation is the same for the control group, indicating that for the region as a whole, a number of factors beyond the immediate influence of the project continue to negatively impact on the standard of living. The results also show that the project activities have not had any negative long-term effect on the nutritional status of the beneficiaries. (PDF contains 44 pages)
  • An evaluation of the pelagic primary productivity and potential fish yield of Kainji Lake, Nigeria

    Adeniji, H.A.; Ovie, S.I.; Mdaihli, M. (Nigerian-German (GTZ) Kainji Lake Fisheries Promotion ProjectNew Bussa, Nigeria, 2001)
    The environmental conditions of Kainji Lake from 1971/72 to date appear to have stabilized to a large extent, judging from the similarity of physico-chemical parameters investigated in this study over the period. Solar radiation (as reflected in variation in temperature) and pH have remained largely constant over the years, while conductivity (index of nutrient enrichment), though significantly higher in 1995/96, could be described as sporadic and needs further monitoring to ascertain its trend in the lake. While water transparency and dissolved oxygen were higher in 1971/72 compared to the other years, these increases cannot be said to be overwhelming. The lower transparency in 1995/96 was due to the exceptional flood of that year and may have also accounted for the poorer dissolved oxygen concentration compared to the other years due to its impact on photosynthesis. There is no evidence from this study to indicate that primary productivity has increased over the years. Consequently, the observed increase in fish yield by the KLFPP from CAS, which is corroborated by estimates from the MEI, cannot be supported on the basis of improved photosynthetic production. The phenomenal high levels of conductivity recorded during certain periods in 1995 (600 mu mhos cm super(-1)) are hitherto unknown in the lake and may indicate a trend towards nutrient enrichment. However, it is premature at this stage to conclude on its long-term impact on primary production and consequently, on fish yield. Secondly, the notion of overfishing in the 80s (Ita, 1993), may need to be further examined as low or dwindling catches could be due to a number of factors among which are the level of fishing effort, the type and efficiency of gears and the intensity of sampling. It would appear that with the intervention of KLFPP, the better management of the lake's fisheries would increase the current level of catch. It also needs to be examined how much of the clupeid fisheries, which is now known to account for a substantial proportion of the total fish yield in Kainji Lake, was included in the sampling of the 80s. (PDF contains 43 pages)
  • Predictions of fish yields and the status of the Kainji Lake fishery, 1998

    du-Feu, T.A.; Abiodun, J. (Nigerian-German (GTZ) Kainji Lake Fisheries Promotion ProjectNew Bussa, Nigeria, 1999)
    Length frequency data was collected for the 6 main species from the Kainji Lake fishery for up to 16 months. Growth parameters were estimated and used for virtual - population and length based cohort analysis. The results from cohort analysis suggest that before the ban on beach seines the maximum economic yield from the fishery was overshot by 70%. Yield per recruit analysis showed that the fish are caught far below their optimum size. Fishing gears and the timing responsible for this early mortality have been identified. After the eradication of seines from the lake a 10% increase in total catch revenue can be expected from the fishery. This is equivalent to an increase in income of Naira 18,300 per annum for each fishing entrepreneur using other methods. A scenario for the regulation of cast net mesh size together with the ban of beach seines has been presented. A further increase of Naira 142 million (N25,500 per entrepreneur) can be anticipated if this is implemented by the Kainji Lake Fisheries Management and Conservation Unit. It is expected that the annual increase in fishing effort presently experienced will cause future yields to decline. The rate of the decline has been reduced by the eradication of the beach seine fishery and will further fall if the minimum mesh size for cast nets is implemented. A recommendation is made to the Kainji Lake Fisheries Management and Conservation Unit to first consolidate the beach seine ban and then to implement a ban of undersized cast nets. (PDF contains 70 pages)
  • Fisheries statistical bulletin, Kainji Lake, Nigeria, 1998

    Nigerian-German (GTZ) Kainji Lake Fisheries Promotion Project (Nigerian-German (GTZ) Kainji Lake Fisheries Promotion ProjectNew Bussa, Nigeria, 1999)
    A tabulated summary is presented of the main fisheries data collected to date (1998) by the Nigerian-German Kainji Lake Fisheries Promotion Project, together with a current overview of the fishery. The data are given under the following sections: 1) Fishing localities and types; 2) Frame survey data; 3) Number of licensed fishermen by state; 4) Mesh size distribution; 5) Fishing net characteristics; 6) Fish yield; 7) Total annual fishing effort by gear type; 8) Total annual value of fish landed by gear type; 9) Graphs of effort and CPUE by gear type. (PDF contains 36 pages)
  • The integrated approach of water hyacinth control on Lake Kainji: with special regard to the design, construction and installation of a water hyacinth barrier across the River Niger

    Ayeni, J.S.O.; Mdaihli, M. (Nigerian-German (GTZ) Kainji Lake Fisheries Promotion ProjectNew Bussa, Nigeria, 1999)
    This document lists the undesirable effects of water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) on fisheries in Lake Kainji (Nigeria) and the integrated Water Hyacinth Control Programme in its ongoing fisheries management and development activities on the lake. Special regard is given to the design, construction and installation of a water hyacinth barrier across the River Niger. (PDF contains 44 pages)
  • Fisheries statistics of Kainji Lake, northern Nigeria, Nov. 1994 - Dec. 1998

    du-Feu, T.A.; Abiodun, J.A. (Nigerian-German (GTZ) Kainji Lake Fisheries Promotion ProjectNew Bussa, Nigeria, 1999)
    Results are presented for the first 4 years data (1994-1998) of the Kainji Lake catch assessment survey, collected and analysed by the Nigerian-German Kainji Lake Fisheries Promotion Project. The following areas are covered: Methodology and alterations of the original sampling concept; Frame survey results - factors relating to the CAS; Catch assessment survey results - general; Gill net fishery; Drift net fishery; Beach seine fishery; Cast net fishery; Longline fishery; Trap fishery; and, Catch statistics from fisherwomen. (PDF contains 143 pages)
  • The effect of long term exploitation by the gill net fishery on the multispecies fish stocks in Kainji Lake, Nigeria, 1969-1997

    Seisay, M.D.B.; Du-Feu, T.A. (Nigerian-German (GTZ) Kainji Lake Fisheries Promotion ProjectNew Bussa, Nigeria, 1997)
    The findings are presented of an assessment made of the gillnet fishery in Kainji Lake, Nigeria from 1969 to the present, on the basis of data sets from commercial and experimental gillnet fishing, with the purpose to detect trends in some key fishery monitoring indicators. During this period, there has been an increase in the number of small meshed nets in the fishery resulting in a shift in the mode to lower mesh sizes; consequently, the average mesh size declined gradually in the fishery. This trend is found to be directly correlated with the decline in the CPUE and mean weight of the fish species. It is argued that the observed trend in CPUE and mean weight is forcing the fishermen to switch effort to gears such as traps which have very small meshes and can indescriminately take all sizes of the fish. It is shown that the catch composition by weight of Citharinus citharus, Lates niloticus and tilapias declined in the gillnet fishery in the late 70's and early 80's. Recent data, from 1994 to 1996, however indicates that C. citharus is recovering, but with declining mean weight. This suggests that the exploitation pattern is shifting to the smaller fish through the use of small meshed nets. In general, however, there has not been drastic changes in species bio-diversity in the Lake as a result of predatory effect and ecosystem overfishing as has happened in other great African Lakes. The species composition since lake formation continued to be dominated by fewer that 20 species. The potential yield for the lake has been estimated to be 32,166 tonnes (excluding clupeids) and the required optimum fishing effort to be 1,814 fishing canoes. In view of the relative stability of the species diversity in the lake and the current fish production level, it is proposed here that this MSY be adopted for all species. This would be achieved with the current effort level in the lake assuming that the efficiency of the fishermen and their gears do not improve. It should be reviewed after 10 or more years of catch and effort data collection. (PDF contains 65 pages)
  • The cast net fishery, Kainji Lake, Nigeria 1970-1997

    Seisay, M.D.B. (Nigerian-German (GTZ) Kainji Lake Fisheries Promotion ProjectNew Bussa, Nigeria, 1998)
    This study was carried out to establish trends in the cast net fishery of Kainji Lake, Nigeria. The cast net fishery was second in importance to the gillnet fishery in the early years after impoundment of the lake and still continues to be an important component of the fishery. Some of the economically important species such as Citharinus spp, Tilapia spp, Labeo spp, Alestes spp and Synodontis spp are exploited by cast nets. The study has not revealed any drastic perturbation in the species diversity, catch composition, and any real ecosystem overfishing. On the other hand, both the catfish, Auchenoglanis spp and the predator Hydrocynus spp appear to have increased in the catch in recent years. Never-the-less there is a decline in the mean weight of the major exploited fish species due to the capture of under sized fishes without allowing them to grow to 'legally' marketable sizes. The use of small meshed cast net and also fishing in the shallow waters of the lake can give rise to this situation. Thus, there are signs of growth overfishing in the fish stocks. It must also be acknowledged that the situation is complicated by the fact that in a multi-gear fishery as on Kainji Lake, the cast net fishery could not be managed in isolation without due regard to the other competing gears. The catch per unit of effort (CPUE) has declined in the cast net fishery possibly due to the increase in effort by the major fishing gears over the years. The ongoing extension campaigns by the KLFPP appears to be having the desired effect, as there was reduction in the number of the major fishing gears on the Lake in 1997. It can be anticipated that if this trend continues, the CPUE will recover in the long run. Yields observed from the mesh selectivity study revealed that for major species in the cast net fishery, both by number and weight, were maximal at 2.5 inch mesh, which contrasts with the fact that current minimum allowable mesh in the Fisheries Edict for the Lake is 2.0 inch. The adoption of 2.5 inch as the minimum allowable mesh in the cast net fishery is recommended to be included in future revision of existing regulations. It is also recommended that for this control to have a desired effect, the casting of the net from the shore should be prohibited so as to reduce the incidence of juvenile mortality in the nursery areas. (PDF contains 28 pages)
  • Fisheries statistical bulletin, Kainji Lake, northern Nigeria, 1997

    Nigerian-German (GTZ) Kainji Lake Fisheries Promotion Project (Nigerian-German (GTZ) Kainji Lake Fisheries Promotion ProjectNew Bussa, Nigeria, 1998)
    The bulletin presents summary tables and charts on levels of fishing activity, fishing effort, yields and economic values of yields for the fisheries of Kainji Lake, Nigeria for the year 1997. Frame survey data and fishing gear measurements are also included. (PDF contains 34 pages)
  • Frame survey of Kainji Lake, northern Nigeria, 1996

    Du-Feu, T.A.; Abayomi, O.S. (Nigerian-German (GTZ) Kainji Lake Fisheries Promotion ProjectNew Bussa, Nigeria, 1997)
    Since 1993, annual frame surveys have been conducted by the Nigerian-German Kainji Lake Fisheries Promotion Project to determine the distribution and number of fishing localities, fishing canoes and fishing gears around Kainji Lake, Nigeria. The total number of fishing localities has increased from 221 in 1993 to 286 in 1996. The fishing localities included 245 permanent fishing villages, 29 permanent fishing camps, 8 temporary fishing camps (with fishermen from Kainji Lake) and 4 temporary fishing camps (with fishermen from outside Kainji Lake area). There was an increase in the total number of fishing entrepreneurs, fishing assistants and fishing canoes over the years. A total number of 5,499 fishing entrepreneurs, 12,449 fishing assistants and 9,278 fishing canoes were recorded during the 1996 frame survey. From 1995 there was a decrease in the number of shoreline fisherfolk and a decrease in the number of transport canoes, the number of engines remained the same. During the 1996 survey, a total number of 18,655 gill nets, 1,560 drift nets, 753 beach seines, 5,548 cast nets, 7,400 longlines and 36,979 traps were recorded. The concentration of the gears (number per km shoreline) was highest in substrata 06 and 08. The total number of gill nets increased from 17,680 in 1995 to 18,655 in 1996. For the remaining 5 gear types a decrease in number was observed. Despite increasing numbers of gears on the lake, of concern is the decline recorded in all the fishing methods of the number of gears owned by individual entrepreneurs. This was most notable in the gill net and longline fisheries. These two fisheries have the lowest daily catch values and coupled with the problem of gear theft on the lake, ownership in future, may be expected to fall further. The number of larger fishing units also declined as did the number of gears new entrants enter the fishery with. The decline is particularly worrying for the beach seine fishery where diversification into other fishing methods would be beneficial in light of the present ban on seines. The group of not active fishing entrepreneurs (those who do not themselves participate in fishing activities) had the highest ownership of gears whilst the new entrants into the fishery had the lowest. There was evidence that these new entrants into the fishery were using cast nets which is worrying given the trend of using smaller mesh size of this gearSince 1993, annual frame surveys have been conducted by the Nigerian-German Kainji Lake Fisheries Promotion Project to determine the distribution and number of fishing localities, fishing canoes and fishing gears around Kainji Lake, Nigeria. The total number of fishing localities has increased from 221 in 1993 to 286 in 1996. The fishing localities included 245 permanent fishing villages, 29 permanent fishing camps, 8 temporary fishing camps (with fishermen from Kainji Lake) and 4 temporary fishing camps (with fishermen from outside Kainji Lake area). There was an increase in the total number of fishing entrepreneurs, fishing assistants and fishing canoes over the years. A total number of 5,499 fishing entrepreneurs, 12,449 fishing assistants and 9,278 fishing canoes were recorded during the 1996 frame survey. From 1995 there was a decrease in the number of shoreline fisherfolk and a decrease in the number of transport canoes, the number of engines remained the same. During the 1996 survey, a total number of 18,655 gill nets, 1,560 drift nets, 753 beach seines, 5,548 cast nets, 7,400 longlines and 36,979 traps were recorded. The concentration of the gears (number per km shoreline) was highest in substrata 06 and 08. The total number of gill nets increased from 17,680 in 1995 to 18,655 in 1996. For the remaining 5 gear types a decrease in number was observed. Despite increasing numbers of gears on the lake, of concern is the decline recorded in all the fishing methods of the number of gears owned by individual entrepreneurs. This was most notable in the gill net and longline fisheries. These two fisheries have the lowest daily catch values and coupled with the problem of gear theft on the lake, ownership in future, may be expected to fall further. The number of larger fishing units also declined as did the number of gears new entrants enter the fishery with. The decline is particularly worrying for the beach seine fishery where diversification into other fishing methods would be beneficial in light of the present ban on seines. The group of not active fishing entrepreneurs (those who do not themselves participate in fishing activities) had the highest ownership of gears whilst the new entrants into the fishery had the lowest. There was evidence that these new entrants into the fishery were using cast nets which is worrying given the trend of using smaller mesh size of this gear. (PDF contains 44 pages)
  • The resource appraisal survey of clupeids in Kainji Lake, Nigeria

    Omorinkoba, W.S.; Seisay, M.D.B.; Du-Feu, T.A.; Mdaihli, M. (Nigerian-German (GTZ) Kainji Lake Fisheries Promotion ProjectNew Bussa, Nigeria, 1997)
    This study includes an analysis of the trawl survey that was carried out by the Kainji Lake Fisheries Promotion Project in May, 1997. The objective of the survey was to assess the biomass and the potential yield of clupeids and the carrying capacity of the beach seine fishery in the entire Kainji Lake (Nigeria). The biomass of the beach seine by-catch was also estimated. The density (kg /km super(3)) of the clupeids was higher in the Bussa and Foge than in the other stations. The lowest density of clupeids was in the Anfani station followed by Jetty, both in the southern basin. These stations were the deepest parts of all the areas trawled, measuring between 37-120 m of depth. There was an inverse correlation between depth trawled and the catch rates of clupeids, though the correlation was poor. The average annual biomass of the clupeids was estimated at 36,769.85 Mt in the entire Lake with an MSY of 11,705.95 Mt. The smaller species, Sierrathrissa leonensis, made up about 97% of the total clupeid population in the lake and occurred at a shallower depth than the larger species Pellonula afzeliusi. From the clupeid production statistics in 1996, it is estimated that the MSY is already overshot by 34%. Therefore, about 698 beach seines instead of the present 810 would be sufficient for sustainable exploitation of the clupeid stocks. Because of the substantial by-catch in the beach seines, this fishing method was banned from Kainji Lake in 1997. An offshore open water seine net is recommended to replace the beach seines on the lake. The number of these nets should not exceed 500. The current ban on beach seine is supported by this study. Nevertheless, and since the ban may not be 100% effective, effort should concentrate on maintaining that the number of beach seines must be kept at most at the present level. Recommendation is made against the introduction of the pair trawling not only from an economic point of view but also for resource conservation, legal and social reasons. The development of this fishery could pose a serious danger to continuity of stocks. It is proposed that priority be given to the development of an open water seine which is at the same level of exploitation as the beach seine and requires similar cost to acquire. (PDF contains 39 pages)
  • Alternative income in Kainji Lake area: introduction of improved cocks to fisherfolk

    Ayeni, J.S.O.; Mdaihli, M. (Nigerian-German (GTZ) Kainji Lake Fisheries Promotion ProjectNew Bussa, Nigeria, 1997)
    Details are given of a study conducted in the framework of the Kainji Lake Fisheries Promotion Project to boost income from alternative sources. The project identified 'improved poultry keeping' as suitable for introduction around the Kainji Lake area. In the long term, the programme will assist increasing especially the income of female members of fishing families, since poultry is kept in the villages mainly by women. (PDF contains 35 pages)
  • Fishing gear survey of Kainji Lake, northern Nigeria, 1996

    Du-Feu, T.A.; Abayomi, O.S.; Seisay, M.D.B. (Nigerian-German (GTZ) Kainji Lake Fisheries Promotion ProjectNew Bussa, Nigeria, 1997)
    A survey was carried out in September 1996 alongside the annual frame survey of Kainji Lake, Nigeria. As in the previous surveys, there were 6 main fishing gear types in use on the lake, which included gill nets, drift nets, beach seines, cast nets, longlines (baited and foul hooking) acid fishing traps. A total of 813 canoes were sampled. The canoe lengths were similar to the previous gear surveys. Altogether 466 gill nets were measured. They had an average length of 149 m, and were mostly bottom set. Of the gill nets measured 68% had a mesh size below 3 inches the minimum mesh size allowable according to the Niger and Kebbi State Fisheries Edict, 1996. Of concern was the large increase in the number of 1 inch meshed nets recorded on the lake. Drift nets had a mean length of 74 m. A total of 88% of all drift nets measured had a mesh size below 2.5 inches, the minimum mesh size stipulated in the State Edict. A total number of 102 beach seines were sampled with a mean length of 110 m, the mesh size in use on the lake remained as 0.1 inches under the Edict beach seines are banned from fishing in Kainji Lake. The decline in the lengths of the beach seines (and therefore catch rates) recorded since l995 was encouraging in the light of the destructive nature of these nets. A total of 30 cast nets were sampled, they had a mean diameter of 9.8 and a mean mesh size of 1.9 inches. All the nets had a hanging ratio of 0.5. Of the cast nets measured 40% had a mesh size below the minimum size of 2 inches recommended by the State Fisheries Edicts. Of concern was the continued rise in the number of gill nets with mesh sizes less than 2 inches. There were 2 types of longlines in operation on the lake. The baited and the foul hooking longlines. They were mostly bottom set and the hook size nos. 12-14 (Kirby sea hook) were predominant. Two types of fishing traps were identified, one was covered with a mesh of thin cane, one with netting material. The fishing traps had a mean height of 0.8 m and a mean width at the vase of 0.53 m. The mean mesh size used was 0.86 inches. Citharinus was reported as the most targeted of all fish species on the lake. Synodontis membranaceous was also targeted by most gears especially the smaller meshed nets. Labeo and Tilapia were low on the list of targeted species but their incidence remains high in the catches. (PDF contains 27 pages)
  • Post harvest losses in the fisheries of Kainji Lake

    Eyo, A.A. (Nigerian-German (GTZ) Kainji Lake Fisheries Promotion ProjectNew Bussa, Nigeria, 1997)
    An assessment is given of the post-harvest losses in the Lake Kainji fisheries of Nigeria. The study focussed on quantifiable information on post-harvest technology and post-harvest losses from fisherfolk, fish processors and fish traders operating within the Kainji Lake basin. The information was obtained from questionnaires sent to a total of 665 respondents, comprising 317 fishermen, 115 fish processors, 125 fish buyers, and 111 fish sellers in 45 fishing villages and collection centres within the lake basin. Considering the total catch from gillnets, longlines, traps and cast nets estimated at 14,000 in 1995 about 1,000 t of fish was either discarded or lost value due to spoilage during handling by fisherfolk. Assuming an average prices of 80 Naira/kg of fish, the loss to the economy amounted to 80 million Naira annually. Appropriate recommendations are made to significantly reduce post-harvest losses in the Kainji Lake fishery. (PDF contains 91 pages)
  • Identification of non fishing income opportunities around Kainji Lake

    Ayeni, J.S.O.; Mdaihli, M. (Nigerian-German (GTZ) Kainji Lake Fisheries Promotion ProjectNew Bussa, Nigeria, 1996)
    The findings are presented of a study carried out in the Kainji Lake region of Nigeria in order to identify alternative income opportunities for the fisherfolk, so as to increase their acceptance of fishery management measures and also to reduce the harmful short-term economic effects that such management options can have. A description is given of the main non-fishing income earning activities in the Kainji Lake area and an assessment is made of the economic viability and expected acceptance of the identified income earning opportunities. (PDF contains 84 pages)
  • Media of communication among fishermen around Kainji Lake basin

    Ibeun, M.O.; Mdaihli, M. (Nigerian-German (GTZ) Kainji Lake Fisheries Promotion ProjectNew Bussa, Nigeria, 1994)
    The findings are presented of a study conducted in the framework of the Nigerian-German Kainji Lake Fisheries Promotion Project to examine the role and structure of communication in fishing villages around Kainji Lake in Nigeria. The major aim was to be able to utilize the knowledge at a later stage in the project cycle to pass on fisheries extension messages to fishing communities. The study had the following terms of reference: 1) describe the structure and processes of communication of fishermen around Kainji Lake; 2) identify the formal and informal media of communication used by the fishermen to communicate information concerning their job; 3) describe the problems inhibiting usage of the different media identified; 4) ascertain the extent of use of mass media by fishermen around the lake; and, 5) identify acceptable ways by which fisheries information can be repackaged for the use of extension workers. (PDF contains 58 pages)
  • Nutritional habits and food consumption pattern of fishing communities around Lake Kainji, Nigeria

    Dreschl, S.; Alamu, S.O.; Adu, F. (Nigerian-German (GTZ) Kainji Lake Fisheries Promotion ProjectNew Bussa, Nigeria, 1995)
    The findings are presented of a nutrition survey carried out in the framework of the Nigerian-German Kainji Lake Fisheries Promotion Project in March/April 1995. The major aim of the study was to obtain closer information on the food habits and food consumption patterns of the fishing population, especially the quantification of fish and small fish in particular, consumed at the household level. A standardized questionnaire was used to collect relevant information on demographic, education and occupational profiles; the information was collected in 39 villages in the southern sector of Kainji Lake. (PDF contains 75 pages)
  • The nutritional status of pre-school children, Kainji Lake communities, Nigeria: a baseline survey

    Adu, F.A. (Nigerian-German (GTZ) Kainji Lake Fisheries Promotion ProjectNew Bussa, Nigeria, 1996)
    This survey was carried out to provide the Kainji Lake Fisheries Promotion Project (KLFPP), whose overall goal is the improvement of the standard of living of fishing communities around Kainji Lake, Nigeria, and an increase in the availability of fish to consumers, with nutritional status baseline data for long-term monitoring and evaluation of the overall project goal. In a cross-sectional survey, baseline anthropometric data was collected from 768 children, aged 3-60 months in 389 fisherfolk households around the southern sector of Kainji Lake, Nigeria. In addition, data was collected on the nutritional status and fertility of the mothers, vaccination coverage of children and child survival indicators. For control purposes, 576 children and 292 mothers from non-fishing households around Kainji Lake were likewise covered by the survey. A standardised questionnaire was used to collect relevant information, while anthropometric measurements were made using appropriate equipment. Data compilation and analysis was carried out with DATAEASE registered and EPI-INFO registered software, using NCHS reference data for the analysis of anthropometric measurements. The prevalence of stunted children in fishing households was high at 40%, while the prevalence of wasted and underweight children was likewise high at 10% and 29% respectively. Children from non-fishing households had a marginally lower prevalence of stunting, wasting and underweight with 37%, 7% and 25 % respectively, although these differences were not statistically significant. Considering the fact that the survey was carried out during a period of relative food abundance, the prevalence of wasting and underweight children is likely to be much higher during periods of food shortage. The prevalence of stunting, wasting and underweight was relatively high for children aged 3 to 23 months, suggesting an increased risk of malnutrition during this period, most likely associated with inadequate weaning practices. The prevalence of malnourishment amongst women of child-bearing age was relatively high, irrespective of occupation of the household, with an average of 11% undernourished and 6% wasted. Vaccination coverage was very low while infant and child mortality were extremely high with about 1 in 5 children dying before their fifth birthday. Based on the ethical obligation to maximise the potential benefits of the survey, recommendations for activities to improve community nutrition and health were made for communication to relevant authorities. (PDF contains 52 pages)