• International conference of fishworkers, and their supporters, Rome, July 4–8, 1984: report

      International Collective in Support of Fishworkers (International Collective in Support of FishworkersChennai, India, 1984)
      While issues related to fisheries were being discussed at the International level to define strategies for future development and management, fishworkers and their supporters from many countries - particularly of the third world met together to exchange their, experiences and analyse their problems.The International Conference of Fishworkers and their Supporters took place in Rome from July 4-8 1984. 100 participants from 34 nationalities attended this conference.About half of them were fishworkers (men and women engaged as crew members, small fishers, processing workers and sellers) coming from all continents. Most of the fishworkers were small-scale fishermen operating in the coastal and inland waters. The supporters were individuals and representatives of organizations who identified with the cause of the fishworkers.
    • Towards an International Collective in Support of Fishworkers: report of the Trivandrum Workshop, November 20-25, 1986

      International Collective in Support of Fishworkers (International Collective in Support of FishworkersChennai, India, 1986)
      This is the proceedings of the Workshop on Issues in Fisheries Development held at Trivandrum, India, November 20-25, 1986.
    • SAMUDRA Report No.1, 1988

      Gillet, Pierre (International Collective in Support of FishworkersChennai, India, 1988)
    • Report of the international symposium on marine environment and the future of fishworkers, Lisbon, Portugal, 19-24 Jun 1989

      International Collective in Support of Fishworkers (ICSF Liaison OfficeBrussels, Belgium, 1989)
    • Fishing legislation and gear conflicts in Asian countries: a case study of selected Asian countries

      Mathew, Sebastian (ICSF Liaison OfficeBrussels, Belgium, 1990)
      This study concentrates on the constraints in the fisheries management schemes. Itt examines the history and politics of fisheries management in five countries. It attempts to show how the specific management measures came into being what the techno-ecological and socio-political factors were that influenced the conceptualization and implementation of these measures; and how these measures are perceived by the fishworkers and the bearing it has on their livelihood. (130p.)
    • Global fisheries trends and the future of fishworkers: report of the international conference of Bangkok (Thailand) January 1990

      International Collective in Support of Fishworkers (ICSF Liaison OfficeBrussels, Belgium, 1990)
    • Reports of the ICSF seminar / workshop on the conditions of fishworkers on distant water vessels, Manila, Philippines, 1-3 February 1991

      International Collective in Support of Fishworkers (International Collective in Support of FishworkersBrussels, Belgium, 1991)
      This ICSF Exchange Programme held in Manila is an offshoot of the Bangkok Conference on “Global Fisheries Trends and Future of Fishworkers” held on January 22–27, 1990. One of the issues raised in that conference was about the operation of Taiwanese fishing vessels outside its territorial waters and the impact of such operations on small fishermen from the countries concerned. The presence of a Taiwanese fishworker as well as an NGO supporter contributed to an enlightening discussion as the former shed light on the sad plight of Taiwanese fishworkers who are the victims of such structural problems. This meaningful exchange between groups of fishermen, particularly Taiwanese and Filipinos, resulted in the plan of the Taiwanese delegation to have some Taiwanese fishermen visit the Philippines and immerse in fishing communities.
    • Enigma of EUS: consultation on epizootic ulcerative syndrome vis-à-vis the environment and the people, 25-26 May 1992, Institute of Management in Government, Vikas Bhavan, Trivandrum 695 033, Kerala, India. Summary of proceedings

      International Collective in Support of Fishworkers (International Collective in Support of FishworkersMadras, India, 1992)
      In the last two decades a serious and severely damaging fish disease has been spreading through countries of the Asia Pacific region with dangerous consequences. Not only is this disease- now officially termed Epizootic Ulcerative Syndrome (EUS)- a scientific puzzle, it is also a worrisome social problem. Hundreds of inland fishermen, often the more marginalized amongst the fishworker communities in the affected countries, have been overnight deprived of their incomes, as consumers began to totally reject the disfigured, disease-stricken fish.It was in this context that the International Collective in Support of Fishworkers (ICSF), in co-operation with the Network of Aquaculture Centres in Asia-Pacific (NACA), Bangkok, organized a two-day consultation on " EUS vis-á-vis the Environment and the People" in Trivandrum, India, during 25 and 26 May 1992. Enigma of EUS is a report of the consultation. While it does not purport to be a verbatim account of the two-day deliberations, it does record the important issues raised, the experiences exchanged and shared, and suggests how grand conclusions about as enigmatic a disease as EUS are ultimately elusive.
    • The struggles of fishworkers: new concerns for support. Triennial Conference of the International Collective in Support of Fishworkers and the Tenth Anniversary of the International Conference of Fishworkers and their Supporters, Cebu, Philippines, 2- 7 June 1994

      International Collective in Support of Fishworkers (International Collective in Support of FishworkersMadras, India, 1994)
      For quite some time now, global fisheries have been ravaged by successive 'crises'. These have their roots in overfishing, technological overkill as well as the widespread disregard for the needs and priorities of the artisanal and small-scale fishing communities.As issues that fundamentally concern fishworkers the world over, they are also the concerns that form the mandate of the International Collective in Support of Fishworkers (ICSF), an international NGO affiliated to the Economic and Social Council of the UN and admitted to ILO's Special List of Non-Governmental International Organizations.These questions were first addressed at the International Conference of Fishworkers and their Supporters, held in Rome in 1984. To mark the tenth anniversary of The Rome Conference, as well as to conduct its triennial conference, ICSF organized an international meeting at Cebu, the Philippines in June 1994. More than 90 participants from over 30 countries gathered to debate, share opinions and exchange views on the state of the world's fisheries, its impact on their lives and how this could be managed.This publication is the official record of what transpired at Cebu. It is a compendium of papers, reports and special contributions on topical concerns in global fisheries management. It also contains the reports of the various working groups which tackled the conference's themes. These converged in a final declaration which detailed the recommendations of The Cebu Conference.As a work of reference, this publication will be of immense use to researchers, activists, environmentalists, NGOs, journalists, policymakers and just about anyone concerned with the world of fisheries and fishworkers.
    • South Asia workshop and symposium on fisheries and coastal area management, 26 September - 1 October 1996, Madras, India: proceedings

      International Collective in Support of Fishworkers (International Collective in Support of FishworkersChennai, India, 1996)
      Fishworker organizations the world over are concerned about the degradation of coastal habitats vital to fishery resources. This concern was articulated in the first-ever Conference of Fishworkers and their Supporters in Rome in 1984, and, subsequently, in all the three conferences organized by ICSF since 1986. In the conference in Cebu in 1994, for instance, the impact of coastal area degradation on the livelihood of the artisanal and small-scale fishery sector was discussed at length. It was recognized that fishworker organizations need to look systematically into major coastal resource management issues and draw up action programmes that would, at the outset, address fisheries issues in the littoral area. This could eventually be expanded to animate fisheries sector institutions to defend the interests of fishing communities in the coastal zone against marginalization by other user-groups and interested parties.There has, therefore, been a strong emphasis on issues related to the coastal environment in the activities and programmes of ICSF. In addition, a specific request from Indian fishworkers for a session to help them develop a framework to examine such issues, provided the impetus for the workshop and symposium on fisheries and coastal area management, held in Chennai (then called Madras), India, from 26 September to 1 October 1996. The focus was on countries in the South Asian region, i.e. Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Maldives and India, which often share rivers and seas, while also facing similar issues of coastal area degradation and management.This publication is the official record of the proceedings of the Madras workshop and symposium. Apart from a detailed summing-up of the various sessions held over the six-day period, it contains country reports as well as accounts of presentations by experts.
    • Coastal area management in South Asia: a comparative perspective (Background Paper prepared for South Asia Workshop on Fisheries and Coastal Area Management, 26 September-1 October 1996, Madras, India)

      Sharma, Chandrika (International Collective in Support of FishworkersChennai, India, 1996)
      Most of the world's fisheries and fishing communities are supported by coastal areas. Consequently, the well-being and future of the fishery sector depend on the health of the coastal ecosystem. Not surprisingly, therefore, concern about coastal degradation and its impact on the fishery sector has long been expressed, notably at the first-ever conference of fishworkers and their supporters in Rome in 1984. Discussions then emphasized how the coastal environment is affected by activities within the fisheries sector as well as by other activities pursued in inland, inshore and offshore areas.It was in this context that the International Collective in Support of Fishworkers (ICSF) organized a workshop and symposium on Fisheries and Coastal Area Management in South Asia, in Madras, India, in 1996. To aid participants focus on the major coastal resources management issues, a background paper was prepared by ICSF. This paper explores efforts on coastal area management, more specifically in the South Asian region, and the extent to which the perspectives of actors in the fishery sector have been incorporated. It also deals with legislation of direct relevance to Integrated Coastal Area Management (ICAM).
    • Yemaya, No. 5, December 2000

      Sharma, Chandrika (International Collective in Support of FishworkersChennai, India, 2000)
    • Yemaya, No. 3, March 2000

      Sharma, Chandrika (International Collective in Support of FishworkersChennai, India, 2000)
    • Workshop on gender and coastal fishing communities in Latin America, 10 to 15 June 2000, Prainha do Canto Verde, Ceara, Brazil: proceedings

      International Collective in Support of Fishworkers (International Collective in Support of FishworkersChennai, India, 2000)
      ICSF's Women in Fisheries (WIF) programme has been working in several countries in Asia, Africa and Latin America since 1992, with the basic objective of strengthening the participation of women in fishworker organizations and in decision-making at various levels. Contact with fishworker organizations in the Latin American region has helped establish the fact that women of coastal fishing communities are not only actively involved in fishery-related activities but also help sustain the community and family in diverse ways. However, the work women do, income-generating or otherwise, is rarely recognized, or ascribed an economic and social value. Women are practically invisible at the decision-making level in fishworker organizations.It is against this background that the Workshop on Gender and Coastal Fishing Communities in Latin America was organized from 10 to 15 June 2000 in Prainha do Canto Verde, Ceara, Brazil. The workshop brought together 36 participants-men and women- from five countries in the Latin American region, i.e. Chile, Peru, Brazil, Ecuador and Mexico. Participants were mainly representatives of fishworker organizations and NGOs in these countries.This document carries a report of the workshop. It also includes background papers from Chile, Mexico, Peru and Brazil that were prepared for the workshop, detailing the situation of women fishworkers in these countries and their role in organizational and decision-making processes. (153pp.)
    • Nets for social safety: an analysis of the growth and changing composition of social security programmes in the fisheries sector of Kerala State, India

      Kurien, John; Paul, Antonyto (International Collective in Support of FishworkersChennai, India, 2000)
      Nets for Social Safety is a first –of –its-kind study, specially commissioned by the International Collective in Support of Fishworkers, to focus on the growth and changing composition of social security provisions in the fisheries sector of Kerala, a small coastal State in southwest India. John Kurien and Antonyto Paul, the authors of the study, enumerate the achievements and problems confronted by a developing maritime State in trying to ensure that a section of its population, which are initially left out of the development process, is netted back into the mainstream. They show how, in Kerala, this process was not only the result of enlightened State policy, but also, more importantly, the result of the collective action by fishworkers themselves. (76pp.)Among the many insights that can be gleaned from the study, one significant conclusion is that, even with limited means, a developing State can conceive and implement innovative social security.
    • Forging Unity: Coastal Communities and the Indian Ocean’s Future, Indian Institute of Technology, Chennai, India 9 to 13 October, 2001, Conference Proceedings

      Kumar, K.G. (International Collective in Support of FishworkersChennai, India, 2001)
      This is the proceedings of the Indian Ocean Conference "Forging Unity: Coastal Communities and the Indian Ocean's Future". It contains papers, presentations and vision statement of the conference
    • Conversations: a trialogue on organization, power and intervention in fisheries

      Sall, Aliou; Belliveau, Michael; Nayak, Nalini (International Collective in Support of FishworkersChennai, India, 2002)
      In the winter of October 1999, as part of a programme of ICSF, three persons converged on the Treasure Guest House in Accra, Ghana. They came from three very distinct parts of the world, each bringing along a different baggage of culture and upbringing. What they shared, however, was a history of intimate involvement with the fisheries of their respective countries. During the course of slightly over a week, the three discussed, almost threadbare, the gamut of issues that lie at the heart of fisheries and fishworkers in the artisanal sector, at a time when various factors are combining to alter the status of both fisheries resources and fishers' livelihoods. In the process, their trialogue often meandered into areas of philosophy, ethics, politics, history, sociology and epistemology. The result is this book, a work of abiding value that goes beyond fisheries, fishworkers and organizations, offering powerful insights, inspired reasoning and composed passion.In Conversations, Aliou Sall, Nalini Nayak and Michael Belliveau talk the reader through a world of tribulation, challenges, success, failure, temerity and grit, all in the belief that "we make no contribution to the world by just getting agitated by what is going on around us. We have to find the right point at which to strike."A valuable resource for fishworker organizations, researchers, activists and anyone interested in organizations and fisheries.
    • The impact of TRIPS and CBD on coastal communities

      Prat, Anna Rosa Martínez (International Collective in Support of FishworkersChennai, India, 2002)
      This report intends to assess the implications of the Trade- related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights(TRIPS) and the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD)for coastal communities’ access to, and control over, aquatic biodiversity. To this end, it reviews marine biodiversity, coastal communities ‘ traditional ecological knowledge systems (TEKS) and the biodiversity they have conserved, and the industrial exploitation of marine genetic resources; it then analyzes TRIPS and the CBD as applied to marine biodiversity, and the implications of TRIPS and CBD for both coastal States and fishing communities’ access to marine resources, control over their knowledge, and share of the benefits; lastly, it ends with some proposals for further research and action by the International Collective in Support of Fishworkers(ICSF). (55pp.)
    • Report of the study on problems and prospects of artisanal fish trade in West Africa

      International Collective in Support of Fishworkers (International Collective in Support of FishworkersChennai, India, 2002)
      A detailed and differentiated understanding of regional fish trade in artisanally processed fish products and the constraints to it,from the perspective of artisanal fish processors and traders... The study focuses on Guinea-Conakry, Senegal,Benin, Togo, Ghana, Gambia and Ivory Coast, which are either important producers or consumers of fish and have significant trade links with one another. They also had fishworker organizations or NGOs who were keen to collaborate with the study.Apart from an analysis of secondary data, the study includes primary data on important regional fish markets and trade circuits, wholesalers and traders, and on artisanal fish processors. The main methodology was individual interviews and meetings with women processors and traders in important markets and processing areas. (92pp.)
    • Proceedings of the Indian Ocean Conference: Forging Unity: Coastal Communities and the Indian Ocean's Future

      International Collective in Support of Fishworkers (International Collective in Support of FishworkersChennai, India, 2003)
      This is the proceedings of the Indian Ocean Conference "Forging Unity: Coastal Communities and the Indian Ocean's Future". It contains papers, presentations and vision statement of the conference.