Recent Submissions

  • Aquatic resources management for sustainable livelihoods of poor people: proceedings of the DFID-ARM e-mail conference, June 2000

    Haylor, G. (Support to Regional Aquatic Resources Management (STREAM)Bangkok, Thailand, 2003)
    This e-mail conference has been organised by the DFID Aquatic Resources Management (ARM) Programme, S E Asia. It forms part of a wider process of consultation including links with other donors, with government and non-government partners and participatory livelihood assessments with vulnerable groups who benefit from aquatic resources. The objective is to provide a forum forprofessionals who have been involved in aquatic resources management in the context of poor peoples’ livelihoods, to share experiences, reflect on approaches and contribute to their development. Participants can submit poster presentations (2-pagers) and contribute to the discussions (via the conference website) organised around 5 key issues, set out in this discussion paper. After 4 weeks online the contributed posters and discussions will be edited into a document assessing approaches to aquatic resources management, which benefit livelihoods of poor people. This will be downloadable from the website. (PDF contains 134 pages)
  • Improving coastal livelihoods through sustainable aquaculture practices - a report to the collaborative APEC Grouper Research and Development Network

    Haylor, G.; Briggs, M.R.P.; Pet-Soede, L.; Tung, H.; Yen, N.T.H.; Adrien, B.; O’Callaghan, B.; Gow, C.; DeVantier, L.; Cheung, C.; et al. (Support to Regional Aquatic Resources Management (STREAM)Bangkok, Thailand, 2003)
    Wild-harvest fisheries for live reef fish are largely over-exploited or unsustainable because of over-fishing and the widespread use of destructive fishing practices such as blast and cyanide fishing. Sustainable aquaculture – such as that of groupers – is one option for meeting thestrong demand for reef fish, as well as potentially maintaining or improving the livelihoods of coastal communities. This report from a short study by the STREAM Initiative draws on secondary literature, media sources and four diverse case studies from at-risk reef fisheries, to frame a strategy for encouraging sustainable aquaculture as an alternative to destructive fishing practices. It was undertaken as a component of the APEC-funded project Collaborative Grouper Research and Development Network (FWG/01/2001) to better understand how recent technical advances in grouper culture and other complementary work – including that of the Asia-Pacific Marine Finfish Aquaculture Network (APMFAN) hosted by NACA – could better support the livelihoods of poor coastal communities. (PDF contains 49 pages)
  • Communications planning: a review of policy and communications

    Friend, R. (Network of Aquaculture Centres in Asia-Pacific (NACA)Bangkok, Thailand, 2001)
    This report presents a discussion of communications strategies to influence policy outcomes. It is based on a series of interviews with projects, NGOs and regionalorganisations to review current activities and assess the implications for STREAM of developing a communications strategy within a livelihoods framework.The main message of the report is that in order to fulfil its guiding principles. STREAM must acknowledge that policy change is related to governance and civil society, and requires a broad range of partnerships and a broad range of voices in the policy-making arena. (Pdf contains 49 pages).
  • Inland fisheries and aquaculture mission Myanmar

    Support to Regional Aquatic Resources Management (STREAM); Network of Aquaculture Centres in Asia-Pacific (NACA); Department of Fisheries of Myanmar (Support to Regional Aquatic Resources Management (STREAM)Bangkok, Thailand, 2009)
    Results of an inland fisheries and aquaculture mission in Myanmar carried out by the Department of Fisheries of Myanmar together with STREAM and NACA to evaluate and plan in the field of inland fisheries from the point of view of livelihoods from freshwater fisheries and aquaculture. (Pdf contains 22 pages)
  • Proceedings of the scoping meeting on Sustainable Aquaculture for Poverty Alleviation (SAPA), Hanoi, Vietnam, 23-25 May 2000

    Network of Aquaculture Centres in Asia-Pacific (NACA); Ministry of Fisheries of Vietnam (MOFI); Support to Regional Aquatic Resources Management (STREAM) (Ministry of Fisheries of Vietnam (MOFI)Hanoi, Vietnam, 2001)
    Vietnam has a large number of poor people whose livelihoods depend in various ways on aquatic resources. More than 20 million people living along the coastline are among the most vulnerable and poorest in Vietnam and similarly poor situations occur with more than 10 million population living in mid and highland areas throughout the country. The Government of Vietnam is giving high priority to the poverty alleviation and following several successful government and donor funded projects, it is recognized that aquaculture can and should play an increasingly important role in improving the livelihoods of poor people. (Pdf contains 216 pages).
  • Sustainable Aquaculture for Poverty Alleviation (SAPA): Strategy and implementation

    Ministry of Fisheries of Vietnam (MOFI); Support to Regional Aquaculture Resources Management (STREAM) (Ministry of Fisheries of Vietnam (MOFI)Hanoi, Vietnam, 2001)
    There is general agreement amongst Government and many donors that aquaculture and improved aquatic resources management can make a significant and direct impact on poverty reduction and hunger eradication in Vietnam. The key policy issue is to better support poor and vulnerable groups who depend on or could make use of aquatic resources through the use of the livelihoods perspective. To address this issue the Ministry of Fisheries of Vietnam (MOFI) has prepared this Sustainable Aquaculture for Poverty Alleviation strategy - the SAPA strategy. (Pdf contains 54 pages).
  • Symposium on participatory approaches to reservoir fisheries management: issues, challenges and policies. Dambulla, Sri Lanka, 04-06 Oct. 2004 Session I. Community-based fisheries management; experience in other countries: presentation on STREAM Vietnam’s experience

    Nguyen, S.H.; Ministry of Fisheries of Vietnam; Support to Regional Aquatic Resources Management (STREAM) (Support to Regional Aquatic Resources Management (STREAM)Bangkok, Thailand, 2004)
    Established in early 2002, STREAM Vietnam has so far attained a number of good experiences and lessons in using participatory approaches for its work. The Country Office has been able to link to a wide range of stakeholders, and is working hard to build close relationships amongst them, so that institutional entities can better supportthe livelihoods of poor aquatic resources users, and support disadvantaged groups of people to improve their living standards by themselves. Reservoir fisheries and co-management are at early stage in Vietnam, but in certain places and industries co-management has brought about successful results by involving proactive participation of communities. Situated on the same continent and having many similarities, the interaction in agriculture and fisheries sector between Vietnam and Sri Lanka has brought the two countries closer. Being members of the STREAM family, there are great opportunities for exchange of experiences and lessons towards sustainable management of reservoir resources. (PDF has 11 pages.)
  • Information access survey: Cambodia

    Mee, A.; Haylor, G.; Vincent, S.; Savage, W. (Support to Regional Aquatic Resources Management (STREAM)Bangkok, Thailand, 2003)
    As the Cambodian government begins to work more closely with local aquatic resources managers from poor rural communities, increased attention is being paid to the use of communication strategies and tools. In particular, the newly established Community Fisheries Development Office (CFDO) of the Department of Fisheries (DOF) is seeking mechanisms to share information about aquatic resources co-management practices and the livelihoods of people who depend upon the resources. The aim of this report is to identify and recommend methods of communication that are appropriate to aquatic resources management stakeholders, focusing in particular on poor rural communities. (Pdf contains 51 pages).
  • Improving coastal livelihoods through sustainable aquaculture practices in Hon Mun marine protected area, Nha Trang Bay, Vietnam: a report to the collaborative APEC Grouper Research and Development Network

    Support to Regional Aquatic Resources Management (STREAM) (Support to Regional Aquatic Resources Management (STREAM)Bangkok, Thailand, 2003)
    This case study describes the present status and trends, and provides recommendations for the improvement of aquatic resources management within Hon Mun Marine Protected Area (MPA), Nha Trang Bay, Khanh Hoa Province, Vietnam. The case study also evaluates options for improving the livelihoods of local villagers through the development of ecologically sustainable aquaculture and fisheries, which include diversification followingcareful selection and trial of appropriate culture species, and application of “best practice” culture methods. (Pdf contains 43 pages).
  • Improving coastal livelihoods through sustainable aquaculture practices – the case of Tubigon, Bohol, Philippines: a report to the collaborative APEC Grouper Research and Development Network

    Santos, R.; Pador, E.; De la Torre, M. (Support to Regional Aquatic Resources Management (STREAM)Bangkok, Thailand, 2003)
    This case study is part of STREAM’s four-country research project, which is exploring how recent advances in sustainable aquaculture have helped and can help improve coastal livelihoods and prevent unsustainable fishing practices in reef fisheries. (Pdf contains 65 pages).
  • System requirement report for Level 2 – national management institutions, for the Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources in the Philippines

    Felsing, M. (Support to Regional Aquatic Resources Management (STREAM)Bangkok, Thailand, 2004)
    This report presents the findings from a thorough literature review, workshops, and group and individual interviews conducted by STREAM in the Philippines in November and December 2003.The ambitious scope of the report combined with the limited time frame and funding available to compile it necessitated the extensive use of secondary data, including both published and unpublished material written by staff of the agencies / organisations involved, with very limited editing of material used. All possible efforts were made to generate information in participation with the government institutions responsible for managing the fisheries, and all contributors (as well as many otherstakeholders) were provided with multiple opportunities to comment on the report content. The contributors are listed on the front page of the report. (Pdf contains 56 pages).
  • Community Fisheries Development Office (CFDO) strategic plan, January 2004

    Support to Regional Aquatic Resources Management (STREAM); Community Fisheries Development Office (CFDO) (Support to Regional Aquatic Resources Management (STREAM)Bangkok, Thailand, 2004)
    In October 2000 the government of Cambodia announced a major change in fisheries management policy. The core elements of the new policy are the reduction of fishing lot concession areas by 56%, the broader participation of fishing communities in the management of fisheries and a focus on the efficient, sustainable and equitable use of the living aquatic resources.To facilitate the establishment and development of the Community Fisheries, support and monitor their activities, the Department of Fisheries was authorized1 to establish a Community Fisheries Development Office (CFDO). (Pdf contains 19 pages).
  • Framework for a pro-poor regional strategy on sustainable aquatic resources management in Asia-Pacific: a statement of understanding and recommendations

    Network of Aquaculture Centres in Asia-Pacific (NACA); Support to Regional Aquatic Resources Management (STREAM); Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) (Support to Regional Aquatic Resources Management (STREAM)Bangkok, Thailand, 2005)
    This statement was prepared by the participants of the FAO/NACA-STREAM Workshop on Aquatic Resources and Livelihoods: Connecting Policy and People, 17-19 March 2005, in Los Baños, Laguna, Philippines. This was the concluding event of the FAO Technical CooperationProgram (TCP) project entitled “Assistance in Poverty Alleviation through Improved Aquatic Resources Management in Asia-Pacific.” The purpose of the workshop was to review and share experiences of the NACA-STREAM Initiative, build consensus on the value of livelihoodsapproaches in aquatic resources management and poverty alleviation, and identify ways of promoting livelihoods approaches throughout the region. (Pdf contains 2 pages).
  • National policy framework and strategy for fisheries and aquaculture development in Pakistan: final national workshop Islamabad, 30-31 Oct. 2006

    Support to Regional Aquatic Resources Management (STREAM); Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) (Support to Regional Aquatic Resources Management (STREAM)Bangkok, Thailand, 2006)
    The Final National Workshop was held from 30-31 October 2006 in Islamabad, Pakistan, with the objectives to:
  • Two worlds across a highway

    Savage, W. (Support to Regional Aquatic Resources Management (STREAM)Bangkok, Thailand, 2005)
    The Government of Pakistan and FAO have put into practice a participatory process that sought to involve as wide a range of stakeholders as possible, with two rounds ofconsultations ‘close’ to people in communities and in some cases, actually with poor people and women. This is the relation of one day of these consultations in a little Pakistani village called Chilya. (Pdf contains 5 pages).
  • Assistance in poverty alleviation through improved aquatic resources management in Asia-Pacific: Yunnan DOA/NACA-STREAM/FAO Workshop on livelihoods approaches and analysis. Mengzi, Yunnan, China, 6-10 Sep. 2004

    Network of Aquaculture Centres in Asia-Pacific (NACA); Support to Regional Aquatic Resources Management (STREAM); Department of Agriculture Yunnan Province (DOA); Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) (Support to Regional Aquatic Resources Management (STREAM)Bangkok, Thailand, 2004)
    This is the report of the “Yunnan DOA/NACA-STREAM/FAO Workshop on Livelihoods Approaches and Analysis” that was conducted in Mengzi, Yunnan from 6-10 September 2004. The purpose of the workshop was to develop and document mechanisms for training in livelihoods approaches and analysis, and to build national capacity to conductlivelihoods analysis. The workshop in Yunnan was the first STREAM event in China, with colleagues coming to participate from throughout the province. It was the fifth workshop in a series, the first of which was held in Iloilo City, Philippines, in November 2003, thesecond in Ranchi, India, in February 2004, third in Vientiane, Lao PDR, in March 2004 and the fourth in Yangon, Myanmar, in May 2004. (Pdf contains 44 pages).
  • Assistance in poverty alleviation through improved aquatic resources management in Asia-Pacific: DLF/NACA-STREAM/FAO National Workshop on livelihoods approaches and analysis. Vientiane, Lao PDR, 8-12 Mar. 2004

    Network of Aquaculture Centres in Asia-Pacific (NACA); Support to Regional Aquatic Resources Management (STREAM); Department of Livestock and Fisheries, Ministry of Agriculture Lao PDR (DLF); Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) (Support to Regional Aquatic Resources Management (STREAM)Bangkok, Thailand, 2004)
    This is the report of the “DLF/NACA-STREAM/FAO National Workshop on Livelihoods Approaches and Analysis” that was conducted in Vientiane, Lao PDR from 8-12 March 2004.The purpose of the workshop was to develop and document mechanisms for training in livelihoods approaches and analysis, and to build national capacity to conduct livelihoods analysis. The workshop in Vientiane was the first STREAM event in Lao PDR, with colleagues coming to participate from Vientiane and many provinces throughout the country. The workshop in Vientiane was the third in a series, the first of which was held in Iloilo City, Philippines, in November 2003 and the second in Ranchi, India, in February, 2004. Subsequent workshops will take place in other countries in the region, includingMyanmar and Yunnan, China. (Pdf contains 59 pages).
  • Assistance in poverty alleviation through improved aquatic resources management in Asia-Pacific: GVT/NACA-STREAM/FAO International Workshop on livelihoods approaches and analysis. Ranchi, Jharkhand, India, 2-6 Feb. 2004

    Network of Aquaculture Centres in Asia-Pacific (NACA); Support to Regional Aquatic Resources Management (STREAM); Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO); Gramin Vikas Trust (GVT) (Support to Regional Aquatic Resources Management (STREAM)Bangkok, Thailand, 2004)
    This is the report of the “GVT/NACA-STREAM/FAO International Workshop on Livelihoods Approaches and Analysis” that was conducted in Ranchi, India from 2-6 February 2004. The purpose of the workshop was to develop and document mechanisms for training in livelihoods approaches and analysis, and to build national capacity to conduct livelihoods analysis. The workshop in Ranchi was a joint India-Nepal event, with colleagues coming toparticipate from Kathmandu and other areas of Nepal. The workshop in Ranchi was the second in a series, the first of which was held in Iloilo City, Philippines, in November 2003. Subsequent workshops will take place in other countries in the region, including Lao PDR, Myanmar and Yunnan, China. (Pdf contains 48 pages).
  • Assistance in poverty alleviation through improved aquatic resources management in Asia-Pacific: BFAR/NACA-STREAM/FAO Workshop on livelihoods approaches and analysis. Iloilo City, Philippines, 24-28 Nov. 2003

    Network of Aquaculture Centres in Asia-Pacific (NACA); Support to Regional Aquatic Resources Management (STREAM); Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources of the Philippines (BFAR); Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) (Support to Regional Aquatic Resources Management (STREAM)Bangkok, Thailand, 2003)
    This is the report of the “BFAR/NACA-STREAM/FAO Workshop on Livelihoods Approaches and Analysis” that was conducted in Iloilo City, Philippines from 24-28 November 2003.The main purpose of the workshop was to develop and document mechanisms for training in livelihoods approaches and analysis, and to build national capacity to conductlivelihoods analysis. The workshop in Iloilo was the first in a series which will take place in other countries in the region, including India (with Nepal), Lao PDR, Myanmar and Yunnan, China. (Pdf contains 53 pages).
  • Poverty reduction and aquatic resources

    Haylor, G. (Support to Regional Aquatic Resources Management (STREAM)Bangkok, Thailand, 2004)
    The Millennium Development Goals call for a reduction in the proportion of people living on less than $1 a day to half the 1990 level by 2015. This means reducing from28.3 percent of all people in low and middle income economies to 14.2 percent. The Goals also call for halving the proportion of people who suffer from hunger between1990 and 2015. If projected growth remains on track, global poverty rates will fall to 13 percent – lessthan half the 1990 level – and 360 million more people will avert extreme poverty. So while poverty would not be eradicated, that would bring us much closer to the day whenwe can say that all the world's people have at least the bare minimum to eat and clothe themselves. (Pdf contains 9 pages).

View more