Recent Submissions

  • Glossoma intermedium survey. Scotland, April 5th to April 10th 2012

    Crofts, Stuart M.; Dixon, Andrew (Riverfly PartnershipLondon, UK, 2013)
    The British Glossomatidae contains seven species, split between the genera Glossosoma, Agapetus and Synagapetus. One species, Glossosoma intermediumhas not been recorded in England since 2003. This was found in a side stream of Hayeswater gill in the Lake District. The main purpose of this survey was to try and locate and record Glossosoma intermedium and was a follow up to a similar survey we carried out in the Glennshee area of Scotland during April 2011. Additionally, as in the 2011 survey it also made sense that while looking for the larvae, pupae and adults of Glossosoma intermediumwe could also record other species of caddisfly (Trichoptera), mayfly (Ephemeroptera) and stonefly (Plecoptera).
  • Synagapetus dubitans, a caddisfly new to Britain

    Crofts, Stuart M. (Riverfly PartnershipLondon, UK, 2011)
    The caddisfly species Synagapetus dubitans has been found recently for the first time in the UK in 2010. This study reports on the sampling and discovery of that species in North Yorkshire. A list of sites where S. dubitans (either as larvae or adults) has been found is given
  • Synagapetus dubitans. 2012 study results

    Crofts, Stuart M. (Riverfly PartnershipLondon, UK, 2012)
    The caddisfly species Synagapetus dubitans has been found recently for the first time in the UK in 2010. This study reports on further sampling activities in 2012 in various locations in North Yorkshire. The caddisfly species found in these locations are listed and the occurrence of Synagapetus dubitans is highlighted.
  • Freshwater Biological Association 1929-1979. The first fifty years

    Fogg, G.E. (Freshwater Biological AssociationAmbleside, UK, 1979)
    Booklet telling the story of the FBA from its founding in 1929 until its Golden Jubilee in 1979. The booklet aimed to produce a readable account of those aspects of freshwater biology that have been among the main themes of the Association's research, as well as some aspects of its history and the philosophy guiding its foundation. The publication includes many images of the FBA's work and history as well as images and illustrations on lake ecology and applied science.
  • A supplement to a bibliography of samplers for benthic invertebrates

    Elliott, J.M.; Tullet, P.A. (Freshwater Biological AssociationAmbleside, UK, 1983)
    A supplement to the earlier bibliography compiled by Elliott and Tullett 1978 (FBA Occas. Publ. No. 4) covering literature from December 1977 - December 1982 on samplers that could be used for the rapid removal of benthic intertebrates from the natural substrata of rivers and streams. In addition it includes papers on marine samplers that have been or could be used in freshwater.
  • Concentrations of major ions in 182 tarns in the English Lake District (1953-1978) [Dataset]

    Carrick, T.R.; Sutcliffe, D.W. (Freshwater Biological AssociationAmbleside, UK, 1982)
    This dataset provides raw data of chemical analyses made during studies on seasonal variations of 182 tarns in the English Lake District, Cumbria. Measurements of sodium, calcium, potassium, magnesium, pH, chloride ions, alkalinity, sulphite, strong acids and nitrate were taken between 1953 and 1978.
  • Major ions in 25 frequently sampled tarns in the English Lake District (1954-56, 1974-1976) [Dataset]

    Carrick, T.R.; Sutcliffe, D.W. (Freshwater Biological AssociationAmbleside, UK, 1983)
    This dataset provides raw data of chemical analyses made during studies on seasonal variations of 25 frequently sampled tarns in Cumbria. Measurements of sodium, calcium, potassium, magnesium, pH, chloride ions, alkalinity, sulphite, strong acids and nitrate were taken between 1954 and 1956 and between 1974-1976.
  • Analyses of treated sewage effluent from Grasmere Treatment Unit (1974-1976), England [Dataset]

    Carrick, T.R.; Sutcliffe, D.W. (Freshwater Biological AssociationAmbleside, UK, 1983)
    This dataset provides raw data of chemical analyses made during studies on seasonal variations of treated sewage effluent from Grasmere Treatment Unit in Cumbria. Measurements of sodium, calcium, potassium, magnesium and chloride ions were taken between 1974 and 1976.
  • Water temperature studies on the R. North Tyne after impoundment by Kielder dam. 1. General introduction and background data

    Crisp, D.T. (Freshwater Biological AssociationWindermere, UK, 1984)
    This report describes the general background to the project, defines the stations from which data sets have been obtained and lists the available data. The project had the following aims: To develop a more accurate and less labour-intensive system for the collection and processing of water temperature data from a number of stations within a stream/river system, and to use the River North Tyne downstream of the Kielder impoundment as a test bed for the system. This should yield useful information on the effects of impoundment upon downstream water temperatures.
  • Concentrations of major ions in the stream water of the upper basin of the River Duddon, England, 1972-1974 [Dataset]

    Carrick, T.R.; Sutcliffe, D.W. (Freshwater Biological AssociationAmbleside, UK, 1983)
    This dataset provides raw data of chemical analyses made during studies on seasonal variations of some major ions in the stream water of the upper basin of the River Duddon in Cumbria. Measurements of sodium, calcium, potassium, magnesium and chloride ions and pH were taken at 26 stations in the River Duddon basin between 1972 and 1974.
  • Analysis of stream waters in the catchment of Lake Windermere (1975-1978), England [Dataset]

    Carrick, T.R.; Sutcliffe, D.W. (Freshwater Biological AssociationAmbleside, UK, 1983)
    This dataset provides raw data of chemical analyses made during studies on seasonal variations of some major ions in the stream water of the catchment of Lake Windermere in Cumbria. Measurements of sodium, calcium, potassium, magnesium, chloride ions and pH were taken at 37 stations in the catchment between 1975 and 1978.
  • The coarse fishes of Britain

    Hartley, P.H.T. (Freshwater Biological AssociationAmbleside, UK, 1947)
    The need for research upon the coarse fishes of Britain, questions of the breeding and rearing of large numbers of young fish, more especially roach, was established back in 1937. The investigation which was begun in 1939 at Barrington in Cambridgeshire was therefore, with the full approval of the National Federation of Anglers, devoted to the general life histories of as many species as possible. Now, five years later, the results of the investigation are presented in the hope that they will provide a basis of knowledge upon which sound policies can be devised for the improvement of fish stocks and the increase of sport. In this report the scientific data, which will be published in full elsewhere, have been condensed as much as possible, but nothing of importance has been omitted and nothing has been concealed.
  • Concentrations of major ions in the stream water of the River Duddon, England, 1970-1974 [Dataset]

    Carrick, T.R.; Sutcliffe, D.W. (Freshwater Biological AssociationAmbleside, UK, 1983)
    This dataset provides raw data of chemical analyses made during studies on seasonal variations of some major ions in the stream water of the River Duddon in Cumbria. Measurements of sodium, calcium, potassium, magnesium and chloride ions and pH were taken at 5 stations in the River Duddon between January 1970 and August 1974.
  • Freshwater biology and water supply in Britain

    Pearsall, W.H.; Gardiner, A.C.; Greenshields, F. (Freshwater Biological AssociationAmbleside, UK, 1946)
    This paper is designed to give a general account of freshwater biology as it bears on waterworks practice. Most water that is used for consumption will commonly go through a storage reservoir. Here special reference is given to the biological relations in standing waters, the biological control of water supplies, methods of plankton estimation, the biology of slow sand filtration and the use of algicides.
  • On statistical treatment of the results of parallel trails with special reference to fishery research

    Buchanan-Wollaston, H.J. (Freshwater Biological AssociationAmbleside, UK, 1945)
    Parallel trials form a most important part of the technique of scientific experimentation. Such trials may be divided into two; categories. In the first the results are comparable measurements of one kind or another. In the second the data consist of records of the number of times a certain 'event' has occurred in the two sets of trials compared. Only trials of the second category are dealt with here. In this paper all the reliable methods of testing for significance the results of parallel trials of a certain type with special reference to fishery research are described fully. Some sections relate to exact, others to approximate tests. The only advantage in the use of the latter lies in the fact that they are often the more expeditious. Apart from this it is always preferable to use exact methods.
  • The production of freshwater fish for food

    Macan, T.T.; Mortimer, C.H.; Worthington, E.B. (Freshwater Biological AssociationAmbleside, UK, 1942)
    It has been estimated that in England and Wales fresh water covers some 340 square miles of which about one quarter is inhabited mainly by salmon and trout; in Scotland the lakes cover an area of 340 square miles. The principal object of this publication is to make available in handy form some of the methods, especially those involving the use of manures, by which crops of fish from water can be increased. The cultivation of water which this implies may be compared directly to the cultivation of farm land: the conditions for growth are made as favourable as possible, the seed is sown in the form of young fish, and after one or perhaps two growing seasons the crop is harvested. There are however many waters about the country where marketable fish are already available and can be removed without prejudice to, and indeed to the advantage of, sporting fisheries. In such cases it is necessary only to remove the fish and to rely on the natural processes of reproduction of those which are left to repopulate the water. Farming waters in the true sense is the concern of the greater part of this publication; the removal of crops of otherwise unwanted fish is considered in the last two sections on perch trapping and eel fisheries.
  • The food of coarse fish

    Hartley, P.H.T. (Freshwater Biological AssociationAmbleside, UK, 1940)
    Remarkably little has been published on the feeding habits of the non-salmonid fishes of British fresh waters. The following report briefly summarizes the results obtained from the examination of the stomach contents of some 2,700 fish, belonging to 19 species, which were obtained during 1939. The results of all examinations of gut contents were analysed, species by species, upon a simple basis of the presence of different types of food. Foodstuffs were divided up into six main categories— fish, molluscs, insects, crustaceans, higher plants together with filamentous algae, and diatoms—and the occurrence of members of any of these categories was recorded for each fish.
  • The potential of RIVPACS for predicting the effects of environmental change

    Armitage, P.D.; Wright, J.F.; Sutcliffe, D.W.; Furse, M.T. (Freshwater Biological AssociationAmbleside, UK, 2000)
    RIVPACS has been used successfully for biological assessment of river water quality but its potential in forecasting the effects of environmental change has not been investigated. This study has shown that it is possible to simulate faunal changes in response to environmental disturbance, provided that the disturbance directly involves the environmental variables used in RIVPACS predictions. These variables relate to channel shape, discharge and substratum. Many impacts, particularly those associated with pollution, will not affect these variables and therefore RIVPACS cannot simulate the effects of pollution. RIVPACS was sensitive only to major changes in substratum. It was concluded that, because of the static nature of RIVPACS, it cannot respond to the dynamic effects and processes associated with environmental disturbance. Thus RIVPACS, while showing direction of change and indicating sensitive taxa, cannot be used to predict or forecast the effects of environmental impacts.
  • Using RIVPACS for studies on conservation and biodiversity

    Boon, P.J.; Wright, J.F.; Sutcliffe, D.W.; Furse, M.T. (Freshwater Biological AssociationAmbleside, UK, 2000)
    Invertebrate conservation relies not only on public support and political will, but also on possessing an adequate understanding of the distribution and ecology of invertebrate species and communities. In the UK, RIVPACS is making an important contribution to assessing the conservation importance of river invertebrate assemblages. So far, work has largely centred on using RIVPACS as an integral part of SERCON (System for Evaluating Rivers for Conservation), in which data collected using the standard RIVPACS method are interpreted with reference to conservation criteria such as species richness and representativeness. Applications of RIVPACS to other areas of conservation - whether providing information on the ecological requirements of rare species, monitoring the success of river restoration projects, or making broader assessments of sustainability - are probably more limited, but merit further examination. It is important to develop closer links between RIVPACS and techniques such as SERCON and RHS (River Habitat Survey) in order to maximise the benefit each can bring tostudies on conservation and biodiversity. It should also be recognised that there are limitations in transferring such systems to other countries where approaches to nature conservation may be very different.
  • An introduction to RIVPACS

    Wright, J.F.; Wright, J.F.; Sutcliffe, D.W.; Furse, M.T. (Freshwater Biological AssociationAmbleside, UK, 2000)
    RIVPACS (River InVertebrate Prediction And Classification System) is a software package developed by the Institute of Freshwater Ecology (IFE). The primary application is to assess the biological quality of rivers within the UK. RIVPACS offers site-specific predictions of the macroinvertebrate fauna to be expected in the absence of major environmental stress. The expected fauna is derived by RIVPACS using a small suite of environmental characteristics. The biological evaluation is then obtained by comparing the fauna observed at the site with the expected fauna. RIVPACS also includes a site classification based on the macroinvertebrate fauna of the component reference sites. New sites, judged by their fauna to be of high biological quality, may be allocated to classification groups within the fixed RIVPACS classification. This has potential for evaluating sites for conservation. In this chapter, the origins and history of the RIVPACS approach are described, including major scientific and operational developments over the life of the project. RIVPACS III is described in detail and predictions at different taxonomic levels are demonstrated. The value of the reference dataset for river management and conservation is examined, and the chapter concludes with a brief consideration of some future challenges.

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