Recent Submissions

  • Glossoma intermedium survey. Scotland, April 5th to April 10th 2012

    Crofts, Stuart M.; Dixon, Andrew (Riverfly PartnershipLondon, UK, 2013)
    The British Glossomatidae contains seven species, split between the genera Glossosoma, Agapetus and Synagapetus. One species, Glossosoma intermediumhas not been recorded in England since 2003. This was found in a side stream of Hayeswater gill in the Lake District. The main purpose of this survey was to try and locate and record Glossosoma intermedium and was a follow up to a similar survey we carried out in the Glennshee area of Scotland during April 2011. Additionally, as in the 2011 survey it also made sense that while looking for the larvae, pupae and adults of Glossosoma intermediumwe could also record other species of caddisfly (Trichoptera), mayfly (Ephemeroptera) and stonefly (Plecoptera).
  • Synagapetus dubitans, a caddisfly new to Britain

    Crofts, Stuart M. (Riverfly PartnershipLondon, UK, 2011)
    The caddisfly species Synagapetus dubitans has been found recently for the first time in the UK in 2010. This study reports on the sampling and discovery of that species in North Yorkshire. A list of sites where S. dubitans (either as larvae or adults) has been found is given
  • Synagapetus dubitans. 2012 study results

    Crofts, Stuart M. (Riverfly PartnershipLondon, UK, 2012)
    The caddisfly species Synagapetus dubitans has been found recently for the first time in the UK in 2010. This study reports on further sampling activities in 2012 in various locations in North Yorkshire. The caddisfly species found in these locations are listed and the occurrence of Synagapetus dubitans is highlighted.
  • Freshwater Biological Association 1929-1979. The first fifty years

    Fogg, G.E. (Freshwater Biological AssociationAmbleside, UK, 1979)
    Booklet telling the story of the FBA from its founding in 1929 until its Golden Jubilee in 1979. The booklet aimed to produce a readable account of those aspects of freshwater biology that have been among the main themes of the Association's research, as well as some aspects of its history and the philosophy guiding its foundation. The publication includes many images of the FBA's work and history as well as images and illustrations on lake ecology and applied science.
  • Concentrations of major ions in 182 tarns in the English Lake District (1953-1978) [Dataset]

    Carrick, T.R.; Sutcliffe, D.W. (Freshwater Biological AssociationAmbleside, UK, 1982)
    This dataset provides raw data of chemical analyses made during studies on seasonal variations of 182 tarns in the English Lake District, Cumbria. Measurements of sodium, calcium, potassium, magnesium, pH, chloride ions, alkalinity, sulphite, strong acids and nitrate were taken between 1953 and 1978.
  • Major ions in 25 frequently sampled tarns in the English Lake District (1954-56, 1974-1976) [Dataset]

    Carrick, T.R.; Sutcliffe, D.W. (Freshwater Biological AssociationAmbleside, UK, 1983)
    This dataset provides raw data of chemical analyses made during studies on seasonal variations of 25 frequently sampled tarns in Cumbria. Measurements of sodium, calcium, potassium, magnesium, pH, chloride ions, alkalinity, sulphite, strong acids and nitrate were taken between 1954 and 1956 and between 1974-1976.
  • Analyses of treated sewage effluent from Grasmere Treatment Unit (1974-1976), England [Dataset]

    Carrick, T.R.; Sutcliffe, D.W. (Freshwater Biological AssociationAmbleside, UK, 1983)
    This dataset provides raw data of chemical analyses made during studies on seasonal variations of treated sewage effluent from Grasmere Treatment Unit in Cumbria. Measurements of sodium, calcium, potassium, magnesium and chloride ions were taken between 1974 and 1976.
  • Water temperature studies on the R. North Tyne after impoundment by Kielder dam. 1. General introduction and background data

    Crisp, D.T. (Freshwater Biological AssociationWindermere, UK, 1984)
    This report describes the general background to the project, defines the stations from which data sets have been obtained and lists the available data. The project had the following aims: To develop a more accurate and less labour-intensive system for the collection and processing of water temperature data from a number of stations within a stream/river system, and to use the River North Tyne downstream of the Kielder impoundment as a test bed for the system. This should yield useful information on the effects of impoundment upon downstream water temperatures.
  • Concentrations of major ions in the stream water of the upper basin of the River Duddon, England, 1972-1974 [Dataset]

    Carrick, T.R.; Sutcliffe, D.W. (Freshwater Biological AssociationAmbleside, UK, 1983)
    This dataset provides raw data of chemical analyses made during studies on seasonal variations of some major ions in the stream water of the upper basin of the River Duddon in Cumbria. Measurements of sodium, calcium, potassium, magnesium and chloride ions and pH were taken at 26 stations in the River Duddon basin between 1972 and 1974.
  • Analysis of stream waters in the catchment of Lake Windermere (1975-1978), England [Dataset]

    Carrick, T.R.; Sutcliffe, D.W. (Freshwater Biological AssociationAmbleside, UK, 1983)
    This dataset provides raw data of chemical analyses made during studies on seasonal variations of some major ions in the stream water of the catchment of Lake Windermere in Cumbria. Measurements of sodium, calcium, potassium, magnesium, chloride ions and pH were taken at 37 stations in the catchment between 1975 and 1978.
  • Concentrations of major ions in the stream water of the River Duddon, England, 1970-1974 [Dataset]

    Carrick, T.R.; Sutcliffe, D.W. (Freshwater Biological AssociationAmbleside, UK, 1983)
    This dataset provides raw data of chemical analyses made during studies on seasonal variations of some major ions in the stream water of the River Duddon in Cumbria. Measurements of sodium, calcium, potassium, magnesium and chloride ions and pH were taken at 5 stations in the River Duddon between January 1970 and August 1974.
  • Biogeography of bacterioplankton in inland waters

    Lindstrom, E.; Logue, J.B. (2008)
    Bacteria are among the most abundant groups of organisms. They mediate key ecological processes. Recent molecular advances have provided greater insight into bacterial diversity as well as allowing a more thorough examination of patterns in the spatial and temporal distribution of bacteria. Thus, the study of bacterial biodiversity and biogeographical distribution has stimulated considerable interest and dispute over the last decade. This review summarises the findings obtained from studies on the biogeography of bacterioplankton in inland waters. We examine factors and processes that may determine and maintain bacterial diversity and biogeography, and relate these to the theoretical metacommunity framework. We conclude that the importance of local environmental factors (such as lake character) for local bacterioplankton community compositions (BCC) is much more intensively studied than the importance of regional factors, such as dispersal. Further, few attempts have been made to evaluate simultaneously the relative importance of the two types of factors for BCC. Finally, we summarise gaps in knowledge, delineate challenges and put forward possible future research directions.
  • Alterations of the global water cycle and their effects on river structure, function and services

    Sabater, S. (2008)
    River structure and functioning are governed naturally by geography and climate but are vulnerable to natural and human-related disturbances, ranging from channel engineering to pollution and biological invasions. Biological communities in river ecosystems are able to respond to disturbances faster than those in most other aquatic systems. However, some extremely strong or lasting disturbances constrain the responses of river organisms and jeopardise their extraordinary resilience. Among these, the artificial alteration of river drainage structure and the intense use of water resources by humans may irreversibly influence these systems. The increased canalisation and damming of river courses interferes with sediment transport, alters biogeochemical cycles and leads to a decrease in biodiversity, both at local and global scales. Furthermore, water abstraction can especially affect the functioning of arid and semi-arid rivers. In particular, interception and assimilation of inorganic nutrients can be detrimental under hydrologically abnormal conditions. Among other effects, abstraction and increased nutrient loading might cause a shift from heterotrophy to autotrophy, through direct effects on primary producers and indirect effects through food webs, even in low-light river systems. The simultaneous desires to conserve and to provide ecosystem services present several challenges, both in research and management.
  • The role of specially designated wildlife sites in freshwater conservation - an English perspective

    Mainstone, C.P. (2008)
    The value of specially designated sites in conserving biodiversity has been a hotly debated issue for many years. The debate has recently been given fresh impetus by the creation of Natural England, the new Government Agency responsible for the protection and enhancement of the natural environment in England, and the challenges facing the management of designated sites resulting from the increasingly tangible effects of climate change. In the freshwater environment, the role of designated sites is very much under the spotlight because of the implementation of the European 'Water Framework' Directive, which aspires to holistic, ecologically-based management of aquatic habitats.This paper explores the underlying premises of, and rationale for, special site designations for wildlife, and provides a frank account of the inevitable clash of management philosophies that designated sites create in the freshwater environment, drawing on experiences of managing designated freshwater sites in England over the past decade. A positive role is outlined for designated sites in freshwater conservation, which addresses these management conflicts in a way that not only meets Government obligations towards these sites but also paves the way for enlightened, progressive management of the wider freshwater resource. As part of this account, attempts are made to clarify the relationship between key biodiversity-related policy drivers in the freshwater environment, and to explain how the spectre of climate change can be addressed within designated site management. The importance of strategic freshwater science, collaboratively designed and funded, in maximising the value of the designated freshwater site network to the wider freshwater habitat resource, is stressed.
  • Microorganisms of the East African Great Lakes and their response to environmental changes

    Descy, J.-P.; Sarmento, H. (2008)
    We have reviewed the phytoplankton composition and succession in the East African Great Lakes, their response to environmental changes, and the communities of microorganisms of the microbial food web. Recent studies in some great lakes, as well as progress in understanding phytoplankton succession and response to environmental factors, enable us to update knowledge of the phytoplankton ecology of these lakes. In particular, we present information indicating that phytoplankton composition in lakes Tanganyika and Kivu may reflect recent changes as a result of global warming or species introduction. We also stress the importance of microbes (at the base of the food web) in these systems and suggest that the microbial food web, which has been mostly overlooked until recently, may play a very large role in determining productivity and nutrient cycling in these large lakes.
  • The kingdom of the shore: achievement of good ecological potential in reservoirs

    Moss, B. (2008)
    The European Water Framework Directive requires member states to restore aquatic habitats to good ecological status (quality) by 2015. Good ecological status is defined as slightly different from high status, which, according to the Directive, means negligible human influence. This poses problems enough for restoration of natural habitats but artificial reservoirs are not excluded from the Directive. They must be restored to good ecological potential. The meaning of good ecological status is linked to that of 'high' ecological status, the pristine reference condition for aquatic habitats under the Directive. From the point of view of an ecologist, this is taken to mean the presence of four fundamental characteristics: nutrient parsimony, characteristic biological and physical structure, connectivity within a wider system and adequate size to give resilience of the biological communities to environmental change. These characteristics are strongly interrelated. Ecological potential must bear some relationship to ecological status but since the reference state for ecological quality is near absence of human impact, it is difficult to see how the criteria for ecological status can be applied to a completely man-made entity where the purpose of the dam is deliberately to interfere with the natural characteristics of a river or former natural lake. Rservoirs are disabled lakes, ususally lakcing the diversity and function provided by a littoral zone. Nonetheless, pragmatic approaches to increasing the biodiversity of reservours are reviewed and conclusions drawn as to the likely effectivemess of the legislation.
  • Efficiency, energy and stoichiometry in pelagic food webs; reciprocal roles of food quality and food quantity

    Hessen, D. (2008)
    In most lakes, zooplankton production is constrained by food quantity, but frequently high C:P poses an additional constraint on zooplankton production by reducing the carbon transfer efficiency from phytoplankton to zooplankton. This review addresses how the flux of matter and energy in pelagic food webs is regulated by food quantity in terms of C and its stoichiometric quality in terms of C:P. Increased levels of light, CO2 and phosphorus could each increase seston mass and, hence, food quantity for zooplankton, but while light and CO2 each cause increased C:P (i.e. reduced food quality for herbivores), increased P may increase seston mass and its stoichiometric quality by reducing C:P. Development of food quality and food quantity in response to C- or P-enrichments will differ between 'batch-type' lakes (dominated by one major, seasonal input of water and nutrients) and 'continuous-culture' types of lakes with a more steady flow-rate of water and nutrients. The reciprocal role of food quantity and stoichiometric quality will depend strongly on facilitation via grazing and recycling by the grazers, and this effect will be most important in systems with low renewal rates. At high food abundance but low quality, there will be a 'quality starvation' in zooplankton. From a management point of view, stoichiometric theory offers a general tool-kit for understanding the integrated role of C and P in food webs and how food quantity and stoichiometric quality (i.e. C:P) regulate energy flow and trophic efficiency from base to top in food webs.From a management point of view, stoichiometric theory offers a general tool-kit for understanding the integrated role of C and P in food webs and how food quantity and stoichiometric quality (i.e. C:P) regulate energy flow and trophic efficiency from base to top in food webs.
  • Picophytoplankton in freshwater ecosystems: the importance of small-sized phototrophs

    Callieri, C. (2008)
    About 40 years have passed since the discovery of picophytoplankton; the present knowledge of the taxonomy, physiology and ecology of these tiny photoautotrophic cells offers new perspectives on the importance of the microbial contribution to global biogeochemical cycles and food webs. This review focuses on the relationships among the components of picophytoplankton (picocyanobacteria and the picoplanktic eukaryotes) and biotic and abiotic environmental factors. The dynamics of picophytoplankton in aquatic ecosystems are strictly dependent upon basin size and trophy, temperature, and nutrient and light limitation, but they are also regulated by grazing and viral-induced lysis. The review considers: the pros and cons of the molecular approach to the study of the taxonomy of freshwater Synechococcus spp.; the importance of ecological aspects in understanding the puzzle of picophytoplankton phylogeny (genotype vs ecotype); and the role of biotic vs abiotic interactions in controlling picophytoplankton dynamics. Biotic, top-down control mechanisms are reviewed as well as knowledge of other biological interactions.
  • Approval of systems of Biological Indication of Water Quality under the auspices of the Severn-Trent Water Authority, UK

    Abakumov, V.A.; Srirska, N.L. (Freshwater Biological AssociationAmbleside, UK, 1980)
    In accordance with the plan for joint Anglo-Soviet scientific and technical collaboration on environmental problems, the comparative evaluation of systems of hydrobiological analysis of the surface water quality started in 1977 at the Regional Laboratory of the Severn-Trent Water Authority in Nottingham were continued in the spring of 1978. The investigations were carried out under the auspices of the Institute of Hydrobiology of the Academy of Sciences of the Ukrainian SSR. Hydrobiological and hydrochemical samples were collected by Soviet and British specialists from the Kiev reservoir and the rivers Dnieper, Sozh, Desna and Snov. The possible approved methods to be adopted were evaluated from the samples using the phytoperiphyton, phytoplankton, zooplankton and zoobenthos against a background of hydrochemical characteristics.
  • Polyphemus pediculus (L.) (Cladocera) as a possible indicator of water quality

    Butorina, L.G. (Freshwater Biological AssociationAmbleside, UK, 1980)
    Usually stenobiotic species are used as hydrobiological indicators of the degree of pollution in natural waters. Cladocera are eurybiotic organisms, therefore their role as specific indicators of the water quality is considered to be insignificant. However, considering new methods Cladocera at present are more and more often used as indicators of oligo- and mesosaprobic waters as well as of the presence of considerable amounts of easily degradable organic matter. Work over many years on the biology of Polyphemus pediculus, this striking representative of the order Cladocera, convinced the author of the possibility of using this species not only as an indicator of water purity but also for the estimation of the degree of water pollution as well as of water characteristics such as colour, turbidity, oxgen content and chemical composition. P. pediculus is one of the most common and abundant species of planktonic crustaceans in shallow waters of reservoirs, rivers, lakes, ponds and temporary water bodies.

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