Recent Submissions

  • Status and management of spring-run chinook salmon

    California Department of Fish and Game, Inland Fisheries Division (California Department of Fish and Game, 1990-05)
    Runs have dwindled in many parts of California and additional protection or management actions are needed to protect the fish from further declines. The following is a report requested by the Fish and Game Commission on the status and current management of spring-run chinook salmon stocks.Fish counts presented in this report were developed by a variety of methods. Some of them are estimates of total run-size or spawning escapement, while others are indices of abundance derived from counts of maturing fish in their holding areas. It is important to note the stock assessment method used. Index area counts will always underestimate the true run size, often by a very large margin.
  • Status of the fisheries report - an update through 2006

    Barsky, Kristine (California Department of Fish and GameMonterey, CA, 2008)
    (PDF contains 153 pages.)
  • Seasonal water quality monitoring in the Klamath River estuary, 1991-1994

    Wallace, Michael (California Department of Fish and GameSacramento, CA, 1998)
    The California Department of Fish and Game's Natural Stocks Assessment Project (NSAP) collected water quality data at high tides on a monthly basis from February 1991 to October 1994, and during low tides from March 1992 to June 1994 in the Klamath River estuary to describe water quality conditions. NSAP collected data on water temperature, dissolved oxygen, salinity, depth of saltwedge, and Klamath River flow. Klamath River flows ranged from 44.5 cubic meters per second (1570 cfs) in August 1994 to 3832.2 cubic meters per second (135,315 cfs) in March 1993. Saltwater was present in the estuary primarily in the summer and early fall and generally extended 2 to 3 miles upstream. Surface water temperatures ranged from 6-8° C in the winter to 20-24° C in the summer. Summer water temperatures within the saltwedge were generally 5 to 8° C cooler than the surface water temperature. Dissolved oxygen in the estuary was generally greater than 6 to 7 ppm year-round. A sand berm formed at the mouth of the river each year in the late summer or early fall which raised the water level in the estuary and reduced tidal fluctuation so that the Klamath estuary became essentially a lagoon. I hypothesize the formation of the sand berm may increase the production of the estuary and help provide favorable conditions for rearing juvenile chinook salmon.
  • Annual report chinook salmon spawner stocks in California's central valley, 1991

    Kano, Robert M. (California Department of Fish and GameSacramento, CA, 1998)
    This report covers the 39th annual inventory of chinook salman, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, spawner populations in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River system." It is a compilation of reports estimating the fall-, winter-, late-fall-, and spring-run salman spawner populatiens fer streams which were surveyed.Estimates were made from counts of fish entering hatcheries and migrating past dams, from surveys of dead and live fish and redds on spawning areas, and from aerial counts.The estimated 1991 total escapement of chinook salmon in the Central Valley was 147,080 fish. This total consisted of 132,571 fall-, 5,921 spring-, 190 winter-, and 8,398 late-fall-run spawners. All of the spring-, late-fall-, and winter-run salmon were estimated to be in the Sacramento River system, while 1,176 fish of the fall run were in the San Joaquin River system.Spawner populations in all individual tributaries (except the American River) and the Sacramento River mainstem were lower than in 1990; but it should be noted that fall run populations in the Feather and Yuba rivers, two of the larger tributaries, were not surveyed that year. The winter run in the mainstem Sacramento River was at a record low level.(PDF contains 42 pages.)
  • Silver King Creek Paiute cutthroat trout restoration, 1991 through 1993

    Flint, Richard; Somer, William L.; Trumbo, Joel (California Department of Fish and GameSacramento, CA, 1998)
    Silver King Creek, Alpine County, is the native range of the Federally-threatened Paiute cutthroat trout, Oncorhynchus clarki seleniris. Paiute cutthroat currently inhabit Coyote Valley and Corral Valley creeks, which are tributaries to Silver King Creek below Llewellyn Falls, and also Silver King Creek and tributaries aboye Llewellyn Falls. Rainbow trout, O. mykiss, were introduced into the basin during 1949 and became hybridized with Paiute cutthroat. Chemical treatments attempted by the California Department of Fish and Game (CDFG) in 1964 and 1976 failed to eliminate hybrid trout. A chemical treatment project was again conducted by the CDFG from 1991 through 1993 to eliminate hybrid trout from within the range of Paiute cutthroat. This report presents a summary of events for the first two years of the Silver King Paiute Cutthroat Trout Restoration Project; a more thorough analysis is made of the third and final year of the project.(PDF contains 39 pages.)
  • Cooperative artificial propagation programs for salmon and steelhead, 1996-1997

    Radford, Linda (California Department of Fish and GameSacramento, CA, 1998)
    Fourteen cooperative fish rearing and planting programs for salmon and steelhead were active from July 1, 1996 through June 30, 1997. For all programs, 208,922 steelhead trout, (Oncorhynchus mykiss), 10,334,457 chinook salmon,(O. tshawytscha),and 60,681 coho salmon(O. kisutch) were planted.(PDF contains 24 pages.)
  • Survival, growth, and yield of brown trout stocked as fingerlings in Hot Creek, California

    Deinstadt, John M. (California Department of Fish and GameSacramento, CA, 1998)
    Four groups of fin clipped brown trout (Salmo trutta) fingerlings were planted in Hot Creek over a six year period. Survival and growth were estimated by fall and/or spring mark-and-recapture surveys. Yield to the angler for two of the tour groups stocked was estimated by stratified random creel surveys. Fingerling survival from the midsummer stocking period to fall averaged 51 %. Overwinter survival from young-of-the-year to yearling fish averaged 49%. Angler harvest of two groups of fingerlings stocked at densities of 16,082 fish/mile averaged 1,704 trout/mile (10.6%) and 194 lbs/acre. Abundant cover and microhabitat suitable tor young trout, ice-free winters, and rapid growth were factors viewed as contributing to high yields. Results do not suggest a change is needed in the general policy of not stocking brown trout fingerlings in California streams. Results do show that fingerlings stocked in Hot Creek, and presumably other productive streams with abundant cover, can effectively fill a void created by limited recruitment.(PDF contains 24 pages.)
  • Cooperative artificial propagation programs for salmon and steelhead, 1995-1996

    Radford, Linda (California Department of Fish and GameSacramento CA, 1998)
    Fifteen cooperative fish rearing and planting programs for salmon and steelhead were active from July 1, 1995 through June 30, 1996. For all programs, 134,213 steelhead trout,(Oncorhynchus mykiss), 7,742,577 chinook salmon,(~ tshawytscha),and 25,075 coho salmon(~ kisutch) were planted.(PDF contains 26 pages.)
  • Age, growth and life history of Klamath River Basin steelhead trout (Onchorhynchus mykiss irideus) as determined from scale analysis

    Hopelain, James S. (California Department of Fish and GameSacramento, CA, 1998)
    Adult steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss irideus) scales were analyzed from eight fall-run, two spring-run, and one winter-run stocks within the Klamath-Trinity River system, from 1981 through 1983, to provide basic information on age, growth, and life history. The higher degree of half-pounder occurrence of upper Klamath River steelhead stocks (86.7 to 100%) compared to Trinity River steelhead stocks (32.0 to 80.0%) was the major life history difference noted in scale analysis. Early life history was similar for all areas sampled with most juveniles (86.4%) remaining in freshwater during the first two years of life before migrating to sea. Repeat spawning ranged from 17.6 to 47.9% for fall-run, 40.0 to 63.6% for spring-run, and 31.1% for winter-run steelhead. Mean length of adults at first spawning was inversely related to percent half-pounder occurrence in each stock. Ages of returning spawners, back calculated lengths at various life stages, and growth information are presented. (PDF contains 22 pages)
  • Evaluation of salmon and steelhead spawning habitat quality in the South Fork Trinity River Basin, 1997

    Borok, Sara L.; Jong, Howard W. (California Department of Fish and GameSacramento, CA, 1997)
    Sediment sampling was used to evaluate chinook salmon(Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and steelhead (O. mykiss) spawning habitat quality in the South Fork Trinity River (SFTR) basin. Sediment samples were collected using a McNeil-type sampler and wet sieved through a series of Tyler screens (25.00 mm, 12.50 mm, 6.30 mm, 3.35 mm, 1.00 mm, and 0.85 mm). Fines (particles < 0.85 mm) were determined after a l0-minute settling period in Imhoff cones. Thirteen stations were sampled in the SFTR basin: five stations were located in mainstem SFTR between rk 2.1 and 118.5, 2 stations each were located in EF of the SFTR, Grouse Creek, and Madden Creek, and one station each was located in Eltapom and Hayfork Creeks. Sample means for fines(particles < 0.85 mm) fer SFTR stations ranged between14.4 and 19.4%; tributary station sample mean fines ranged between 3.4 and 19.4%. Decreased egg survival would be expected at 4 of 5 mainstem SFTR stations and at one station in EF of SFTR and Grouse Creek where fines content exceed 15%. Small gravel/sand content measured at all stations were high, and exceed levels associated with reduced sac fry emergence rates. Reduction of egg survival or sac fry emergence due to sedimentation in spawning gravels could lead to reduced juvenile production from the South Fork Trinity River.(PDF contains 18 pages.)
  • Chinook salmon spawner stocks in California's Central Valley, 1989: annual report

    Kano, Robert M. (California Department of Fish and GameSacramento, CA, 1998)
    This report covers the 37th annual inventory of chinook salman, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, spawner populations in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River system.-It is a compilation of reports estimating the fall-, winter-, late-fall-, and spring-run salmon spawner populations for streams which were surveyed. Estimates were made from counts of fish entering hatcheries and migrating past dams, froro surveys of dead and live fish and redds on spawning areas, and from aerial counts. The estimated 1989 total escapement of chinook salmon in the Central Valley was 205,990 fish. This total consisted of 181,864 fall-, 12,171 spring-, 539 winter-, and 11,416 late-fall-run spawners. All of the spring-, late-fall-, and winter-run salmon were estimated to be in the Sacramento River system, while 3,493 fish of the fall run were in the San Joaquin River system. Due to decreases of spawner populations in most Central Valley tributaries, the total 1989 salmon stock was 32% lower than in 1988; however, late-fall salmon in the upper Sacramento River had a run size similar to that of 1988. The winter run in the mainstem Sacramento River was at a record low level. (PDF contains 44 pages.)
  • Final Supplemental Environmental Document Pacific herring commercial fishing regulations (Sections 163, 163.1, and 164, Title 14, California Code of Regulations)

    California Department of Fish and Game (State of California , The Resource Agency, Department of Fish and GameCalifornia, 2008)
    (PDF contains 63 pages.)
  • Cruise Report 64-S-7 Crab and Shrimp

    Gotshall, Dan (California Department of Fish and Game, Marine Resources OperationsTerminal Island, CA, 1964)
    (PDF contains 4 pages.)
  • Cruise Report 64-S-5 Shrimp

    Gotshall, Dan; Isaacson, Peter A. (California Department of Fish and Game, Marine Resources OperationsTerminal Island, CA, 1964)
    (PDF contains 5 pages.)
  • Cruise Report 64-S-4 Bottomfish

    Smith, Gary (California Department of Fish and Game, Marine Resources OperationsTerminal Island, CA, 1964)
    (PDF contains 4 pages.)
  • Cruise Report 64-S-6: N. B. Scofield, September 29 to October 25, 1964

    Poole, Richard L. (California Department of Fish and Game, Marine Resources OperationsTerminal Island, CA, 1964)
    (PDF contains 4 pages.)
  • Cruise Report 64-S-3 - Albacore

    Frey, Herbert W. (California Department of Fish and Game, Marine Resources OperationsTerminal Island, CA, 1964)
    (PDF contains 3 pages.)
  • Pre-Cruise Plan: Cruise 64-S-3 - Albacore Survey

    Marine Resources Operations (California Department of Fish and Game, Marine Resources OperationsTerminal Island, CA, 1964)
    (PDF contains 4 pages.)
  • Cruise Report 64-S-2 - Shrimp

    Jow, Tom; Isaacson, Peter A. (California Department of Fish and Game, Marine Resources OperationsTerminal Island, CA, 1964)
    (PDF contains 7 pages.)
  • Cruise Report 64-S-1 - Exploratory

    Carlisle, Jr., John G. (California Department of Fish and Game, Marine Resources OperationsTerminal Island, CA, 1964)
    (PDF contains 3 pages.)

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