Recent Submissions

  • An annotated compendium of spawning ground surveys in the Columbia River Basin above Bonneville Dam, 1960-1984

    Schwartzberg, Matthew; Roger, Phillip B. (Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish CommissionPortland, OR, 1986-03-01)
  • 1986 Columbia River spring dip-net tribal subsistence fishery

    Schaller, Howard A. (Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish CommissionPortland, OR, 1987-05)
  • Columbia River chinook salmon stock monitoring project for stocks originating above Bonneville Dam : field operations guide

    Heindl, Alex L. (Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish CommissionPortland, OR, 1989-05-25)
  • Evaluating the species selectivity of 8- and 9-inch mesh set gillnets : a 1988 test fishery in the John Day Reservoir of the Columbia River

    Lumley, B. Paul; Schaller, Howard A. (Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish CommissionPortland, OR, 1989-09)
  • Identifying hatchery and naturally spawning stocks of Columbia Basin summer chinook salmon using scale pattern analyses in 1990

    Fryer, Jeffrey K.; Schwartzberg, Matthew (Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish CommissionPortland, OR, 1993-02-22)
  • Monitoring of streambank stability and streamside vegetation in a livestock exclosure on the Warm Springs River, Oregon : comparison of ground-based surveys with aerial photographic analysis

    McCullough, Dale A. (Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish CommissionPortland, OR, 1999-03-16)
    The objective of this monitoring project was to determine the baseline condition for a 960-m long stream reach and its associated streamside zone, which terminates at the confluence with the Deschutes River. This stream reach had been damaged heavily in the February 1996 flood and had also received many years of overuse by livestock grazing. The monitoring project was conducted in July 1997 just after installation of riparian exclosure fencing. Future resurvey of the study area will allow determination of progress made in ecological recovery.
  • Age and length composition of Columbia Basin chinook, sockeye, and coho salmon at Bonneville Dam in 1999

    Hooff, Rian C.; Ritchie, Amy; Fryer, Jeff; Whiteaker, John (Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish CommissionPortland, OR, 1999-12-14)
  • Age and length composition of Columbia Basin chinook, sockeye, and coho salmon at Bonneville Dam in 1998

    Hooff, Rian C.; Fryer, Jeff; Netto, John (Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish CommissionPortland, OR, 1999-03-31)
  • Age and length composition of Columbia Basin chinook, sockeye, and coho salmon at Bonneville Dam in 2000

    Kelsey, Denise A.; Fryer, Jeffrey K. (Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish CommissionPortland, OR, 2001-02-09)
    In 2000, representative samples of adult Columbia Basin chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), sockeye (O. nerka), and coho salmon (O. kisutch), populations were collected at Bonneville Dam. Fish were trapped, anesthetized, sampled for scales and biological data, allowed to revive, and then released. Scales were examined to estimate age composition and the results contribute to an ongoing database for age class structure of Columbia Basin salmon populations. Based on scale analysis, four-year-old fish (from brood year (BY) 1996) were estimated to comprise 83% of the spring chinook, 31% of the summer chinook, and 32% of the upriver bright fall chinook salmon population. Five-year-old fish (BY 1995) were estimated to comprise 2% of the spring chinook, 26% of the summer chinook, and 40% of the fall chinook salmon population. Three-year-old fish (BY 1997) were estimated to comprise 14% of the spring chinook, 42% of the summer chinook, and 17% of the fall chinook salmon population. Two-year-olds accounted for approximately 11% of the fall chinook population. The sockeye salmon population sampled at Bonneville was predominantly four-year-old fish (95%), and the coho salmon population was 99.9% three-year-old fish (Age 1.1). Length analysis of the 2000 returns indicated that chinook salmon with a stream-type life history are larger (mean length) than the chinook salmon with an ocean-type life history. Trends in mean length over the sampling period were also analysis for returning 2000 chinook salmon. Fish of age classes 0.2, 1.1, 1.2, and 1.3 have a significant increase in mean length over time. Age classes 0.3 and 0.4 have no significant change over time and age 0.1 chinook salmon had a significant decrease in mean length over time. A year class regression over the past 11 years of data was used to predict spring and summer chinook salmon population sizes for 2001. Based on three-year-old returns, the relationship predicts four-year-old returns of 325,000 (± 111,600, 90% Predictive Interval [PI]) spring chinook and 27,800 (± 29,750, 90% PI) summer chinook salmon. Based on four-year-old returns, the relationship predicts five-year-old returns of 54,300 (± 40,600, 90% PI) spring chinook and 11,000 (± 3,250, 90% PI) summer chinook salmon. The 2001 run size predictions used in this report should be used with caution, these predictions are well beyond the range of previously observed data.
  • Age and length composition of Columbia Basin chinook, sockeye, and coho salmon at Bonneville Dam in 2002

    Kelsey, Denise A.; Fryer, Jeffrey K. (Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish CommissionPortland, OR, 2003-03-20)
    In 2002, representative samples of migrating Columbia Basin chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), sockeye (O. nerka), and coho salmon (O. kisutch) adult populations were collected at Bonneville Dam. Fish were trapped, anesthetized, sampled for scales and biological data, revived, and then released. Scales were examined to estimate age composition; the results contributed to an ongoing database for age class structure of Columbia Basin salmon populations. Based on scale analysis of chinook salmon, four-year-old fish (from brood year [BY] 1998) comprised 86% of the spring chinook, 51% of the summer chinook, and 51% of the bright fall chinook salmon population. Five-year-old fish (BY 1997) comprised 13% of the spring chinook, 43% of the summer chinook, and 11% of the bright fall chinook salmon population. The sockeye salmon population at Bonneville was predominantly five-year-old fish (55%), with 40% returning as four-year-olds in 2002. For the coho salmon population, 88% of the population was three-year-old fish of age class 1.1, while 12% were age class 1.0. Length analysis of the 2002 returns indicated that chinook salmon with a stream-type life history are larger (mean length) at age than the chinook salmon with an ocean-type life history. Trends in mean length over the sampling period for returning 2002 chinook salmon were analyzed. Chinook salmon of age classes 1.2 and 1.3 show a significant increase in mean length over the duration of the migration. A year class regression over the past 14 years of data was used to predict spring, summer, and bright fall chinook salmon population sizes for 2003. Based on three-year-old returns, the relationship predicts four-year-old returns of 54,200 (± 66,600, 90% predictive interval [PI]) spring chinook, 23,800 (± 19,100, 90% PI) summer, and 169,100 (± 139,500, 90% PI) bright fall chinook salmon for the 2003 runs. Based on four-year-old returns, the relationship predicts five-year-old returns of 36,300 (± 35,400, 90% PI) spring, 63,800 (± 10,300, 90% PI) summer, and 91,100 (± 69,400, 90% PI) bright fall chinook salmon for the 2003 runs. The 2003 run size predictions should be used with caution; some of these predictions are well beyond the range of previously observed data.
  • Age and length composition of Columbia Basin chinook, sockeye, and coho salmon at Bonneville Dam in 2001

    Kelsey, Denise A.; Fryer, Jeffrey K. (Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish CommissionPortland, OR, 2002-01-31)
    In 2001, representative samples of adult Columbia Basin chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), sockeye (O. nerka), and coho salmon (O. kisutch) populations at Bonneville Dam were collected. Fish were trapped, anesthetized, sampled for scales and biological data, revived, and then released adult migrating salmonids. Scales were examined to estimate age composition; the results contributed to an ongoing database for age class structure of Columbia Basin salmon populations. Based on scale analysis of chinook salmon, four-year-old fish (from brood year [BY] 1997) comprised 88% of the spring chinook, 67% of the summer chinook, and 42% of the Bright fall chinook salmon population. Five-year-old fish (BY 1996) comprised 9% of the spring chinook, 14% of the summer chinook, and 9% of the fall chinook salmon population. The sockeye salmon population at Bonneville was predominantly four-year-old fish (81%), with 18% returning as five-year-olds in 2001. The coho salmon population was 96% three-year-old fish (Age 1.1). Length analysis of the 2001 returns indicated that chinook salmon with a stream-type life history are larger (mean length) than the chinook salmon with an ocean-type life history. Trends in mean length over the sampling period for returning 2001 chinook salmon were analyzed. Chinook salmon of age classes 0.2 and 1.3 show a significant increase in mean length over time. Age classes 0.1, 0.3, 0.4, 1.1, 1.2, and 1.4 show no significant change over time. A year class regression over the past 12 years of data was used to predict spring, summer, and Bright fall chinook salmon population sizes for 2002. Based on three-year-old returns, the relationship predicts four-year-old returns of 132,600 (± 46,300, 90% predictive interval [PI]) spring chinook and 44,200 (± 11,700, 90% PI) summer chinook salmon for the 2002 runs. Based on four-year-old returns, the relationship predicts five-year-old returns of 87,800 (± 54,500, 90% PI) spring, 33,500 (± 11,500, 90% PI) summer, and 77,100 (± 25,800, 90% PI) Bright fall chinook salmon for the 2002 runs. The 2002 run size predictions should be used with caution; some of these predictions are well beyond the range of previously observed data.
  • Evaluation of Deschutes River fall chinook salmon

    Beaty, Roy E. (Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish CommissionPortland, OR, 1996-07-01)
  • Identification of Columbia Basin sockeye salmon stocks based on scale pattern analyses, 1990

    Fryer, Jeffrey K.; Schwartzberg, Matthew (Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish CommissionPortland, OR, 1991-03-25)
  • A monitoring strategy for application to salmon-bearing watersheds

    McCullough, Dale A.; Espinosa Jr., F. Al (Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish CommissionPortland, OR, 1996-06-04)
  • Identification of Columbia Basin sockeye salmon stocks using scale pattern analyses in 2001

    Fryer, Jeffrey K.; Kelsey, Denise A. (Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish CommissionPortland, OR, 2002-03-20)
  • Identification of Columbia Basin sockeye salmon stocks using scale pattern analyses in 2000

    Fryer, Jeffrey K.; Kelsey, Denise A. (Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish CommissionPortland, OR, 2001-05-30)
  • Identification of Columbia Basin sockeye salmon stocks using scale pattern analyses in 1991

    Fryer, Jeffrey K.; Pearson, Carolyn E.; Schwartzberg, Matthew (Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish CommissionPortland, OR, 1992-02-11)
  • Identification of Columbia Basin sockeye salmon stocks using scale pattern analyses in 1993

    Fryer, Jeffrey K.; Schwartzberg, Matthew (Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish CommissionPortland, OR, 1994-05-31)
  • Identification of Columbia Basin sockeye salmon stocks using scale pattern analyses in 1992

    Fryer, Jeffrey K.; Schwartzberg, Matthew (Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish CommissionPortland, OR, 1993-02-22)

View more