Recent Submissions

  • Controlling Invasives: Sea Grant Research Provides Insight into Lionfish Removal Efforts

    Stalling, C.; Albins, M.; Green, S.; Akins, L.; Appledoorn, R.S.; Tuohy, C.H. (2016)
    Sea Grant research across five state programs has focused on mitigating impacts from the lionfish invasion in the Western Atlantic and Caribbean by investigating different management strategies
  • Recreational anglers' valuation of near-shore marine fisheries in Florida

    Milon, J. Walter; Thunberg, Eric M.; Adams, Charles M.; Lin, C.T. Jordan (Florida Sea Grant College ProgramGainesville, FL, 1994)
    This report describes and summarizes the results from a state-wide survey of Floridaresident saltwater anglers. The survey was designed to provide estimates of the economic valueanglers place on marginal changes in management of selected near-shore marine species.The Contingent valuation method was used to elicit angler willingness to pay for changesin management for redfish, seatrout , mullet, sheepshead, pompano. and king mackerel.Contingent valuation is a process in which respondents are presented with a detailed scenario thatdescribes an opportunity to express their willingness to pay for a proposed change in currentconditions. The process consists of three parts. First. the change in current conditions, or the"good" to be valued is described. Second, the payment method is described. The paymentmethod is usually closely related to typical methods of buying goods similar to the one to bevalued. Finally. the respondent is asked how much they would pay for the good described inthe scenario. A special saltwater fishing license stamp that would allow the holder to takeadvantage of the described management change was used as a payment mechanism. (PDF contains 147 pages.)
  • HACCP: Programa de capacitacion en analisis de peligros y puntos criticos de control

    Comité Directivo de la Alianza; Comité Editorial de Procedimientos de Control Sanitario del Procesamiento de Peces y de Productos Pesqueros (Florida Sea Grant College ProgramGainesville, FL, 2001)
    El HACCP es un sistema preventivo más que reactivo de control de peligros. Los procesadores dealimentos pueden utilizarlo para garantizar productos alimentarios más inocuos para losconsumidores. Para asegurar alimentos más inocuos, el sistema HACCP está diseñado paraidentificar los peligros, establecer controles y monitorear estos controles. Los peligros puedenconsistir en microorganismos nocivos o en contaminantes químicos y/o físicos. (PDF tiene 289 paginas.)
  • Seafood safety: economics of Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) programmes

    Cato, James C.; Fish Utilization and Marketing Service, Fishery Industries Division, Fisheries Department, FAO (Fish Utilization and Marketing Service, Fishery Industries Division, Fisheries Department, FAORome, 1998)
    Seventy percent of the world's catch of fish and fishery products is consumed as food. Fish and shellfish products represent 15.6 percent of animal protein supply and 5.6 percent of total protein supply on a worldwide basis. Developing countries account for almost 50 percent of global fish exports. Seafood-borne disease or illness outbreaks affect consumers both physically and financially, and create regulatory problems for both importing and exporting countries. Seafood safety as a commodity cannot be purchased in the marketplace and government intervenes to regulate the safety and quality of seafood. Theoretical issues and data limitations create problems in estimating what consumers will pay for seafood safety and quality. The costs and benefits of seafood safety must be considered at all levels, including the fishers, fish farmers, input suppliers to fishing, processing and trade, seafood processors, seafood distributors, consumers and government. Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) programmes are being implemented on a worldwide basis for seafood. Studies have been completed to estimate the cost of HACCP in various shrimp, fish and shellfish plants in the United States, and are underway for some seafood plants in the United Kingdom, Canada and Africa. Major developments within the last two decades have created a set of complex trading situations for seafood. Current events indicate that seafood safety and quality can be used as non-tariff barriers to free trade. Research priorities necessary to estimate the economic value and impacts of achieving safer seafood are outlined at the consumer, seafood production and processing, trade and government levels. An extensive list of references on the economics of seafood safety and quality is presented. (PDF contains 56 pages; captured from html.)
  • Aquaculture and marketing of the Florida Bay Scallop in Crystal River, Florida

    Blake, Norman J.; Adams, Charles; Degner, Robert; Sweat, Don; Moss, Susan D.; Sturmer, Leslie (Florida Sea Grant College ProgramGainesville, FL, 2000)
    The overall goal of this study was to develop a new fishery resource product through open-wateraquaculture for the west coast of Florida that would compete as a non-traditional product through marketdevelopment. Specific objectives were as follows:I. To grow a minimum of 50, 000 juvenile scallops to a minimum market size of40 mm in a cageand float system in the off-shore waters of Crystal River, Florida.2. To determine the growth rate, survival, and time to market size for the individuals in this systemand area to other similar projects like Virginia.3. To introduce local fishermen and the aquaculture students at Crystal River High School to thehatchery, nursery, and grow-out techniques.4. To determine the economic and financial characteristics of bay scallop culture in Florida andassess the sensitivity of projected costs and earnings to changes in key technical, managerial, andmarket related parameters.5. To determine the market acceptability and necessary marketing strategy for whole bay scallopproduct in Florida. (PDF has 99 pages.)
  • Coastal & Marine Issues Survey

    Sidman, Charles; Fik, Tim; Havens, Karl (Florida Sea Grant College ProgramGainesville, FL, 2008)
    Florida Sea Grant management and extension specialists developed a questionnaire to solicitinformation regarding the recipient’s county of residence, occupation, and primary coastalactivities. Survey recipients were also asked to select from a list the top five marine-relatedtopics that defined prior strategic plan themes (i.e., marine bio-technology, fisheries, aquaculture,seafood safety, coastal communities, ecosystem health, coastal hazards, and marine education).In addition, questionnaire recipients were asked to evaluate (on a scale of one to five) theimportance of a series of listed outcomes that characterize priority planning themes. Last, surveyrecipients identified up to three priority themes and outcomes that they felt were particularlyimportant and in need of resolution. (PDF contains 36 pages.)
  • Guide to the meso-scale production of the copepod Acartia tonsa

    Marchus, Nancy H.; Wilcox, Jeffrey A. (Florida Sea Grant College ProgramGainesville, FL, 2007)
    This manual is intended as a guide for the daily production of a few million A. tonsanauplii for feeding to marine vertebrates and invertebrates. This scale of production isgreater than most research would require, but smaller than commercial production,hence the term meso-scale production. This manual will briefly describe the biology ofAcartia tonsa Dana that is relevant to culture, the culture methodology for meso-scaleproduction of their eggs and nauplii, the system components utilized in production, andhow to construct a few simple tools useful for this scale of production. Commercialproduction of copepods requires much greater feed production than is described, or thedevelopment of an efficient artificial feed, and, therefore, is not the focus of thismanual. (PDF conatains 29 pages.)
  • Common Coastal Plants in Florida: a guide to planting and maintenance

    Barnett, Michael R.; Crewz, David W.; Florida Sea Grant Salt-Tolerant Vegetation Advisory Panel (Florida Sea Grant College ProgramGainesville, FL, 1997)
    (PDF has 125 pages.)
  • Organizational Structures and Strategies For the Hard Clam Aquaculture Industry in Florida

    Ruth, Amanda M.; Sturmer, Leslie; Adams, Charles M. (Florida Sea Grant College ProgramGainesville, FL, 2005)
    This study provides guidance on statewide organization for the commercial hard clamculture industry in Florida. The study characterizes the structure of and identifies strategiesfor successful agricultural and aquacultural organizations designed to provide the resourcesneeded to solve current and projected industry problems. Objectives were to 1) characterizethe structure of successful and relevant organizations, 2) identify successful revenuegenerating strategies, 3) provide the hard clam culture industry with options to help facilitatetheir organizational decisions, and 4) assist clam growers in Florida in developing anumbrella organizational strategy that will meet their future industry needs. (PDF has 60 pages.)
  • Fisheries conservation and habitat improvement in marine ecosystems

    Seaman, William; Miller, Margaret (Florida Sea Grant College ProgramGainesville, FL, 2004)
    The following discussion presents information on human-made reefs and their role--as one tool of many--in the management of both fisheries and habitat. Principal subjects covered in this paper include a definition of marine habitat improvement and determination of its attainment, the present applications of reef construction technology to environmental situations both generally and in three case-studies, and suggested desirable attributes for incorporation into future use of this technology. (PDF has 11 pages.)
  • Green mussel, Pema viridis

    Serne, Bill (Florida Sea Grant College ProgramGainesville, FL, 2000)
    (2 page flyer)
  • Ecology of aquaculture species and enhancement of stocks: proceedings of the thirtieth U.S. - Japan meeting on aquaculture, Sarasota, FL, Dec. 3-4, 2001

    Nakamura, Yasuaki; McVey, James P.; Leber, Ken; Neidig, Carole; Fox, Sondra; Churchill, Kim (Florida Sea Grant College ProgramGainesville, FL, 2003)
    CONTENTS:I. U.S.-Japan CooperationOpen Ocean Aquaculture – A Venue for Cooperative Research Between the United States and Japan.............................................................................. 1C. HelsleyII. Growth, Nutrition and Genetic DiversityDaily Ration of Hatchery-Reared Japanese Flounder Paralichthys olivaceus as an Indicator of Release Place, Time and Fry Quality. In situ Direct Estimation and Possibility of New Methods by Stable Isotope............................ 7O. Tominaga, T. Seikai, T. Tsusaki, Y. Hondo, N. Murakami, K. Nogami, Y. Tanaka and M. TanakaNucleic Acids and Protein Content as a Measure to Evaluate the Nutritional Condition of Japanese Flounder Paralichthys olivaceus Larvae and Juveniles........................................................................................................ 25W. GwakGenetic Diversity Within and Between Hatchery Strains of Flounder Paralichthys olivaceus Assessed by Means of Microsatellite and Mitochondrial DNA Sequencing Analysis...................................................................... 43M. Sekino, M. Hara and N. TaniguchiTracking Released Japanese Flounder Paralichthys olivaceus by Mitochondrial DNA Sequencing................................................................................ 51T. FujiiPreliminary Aspects of Genetic Management for Pacific Threadfin Polydactylus sexfilis Stock Enhancement Research in Hawaii........................................ 55M. Tringali, D. Ziemann and K. StuckEnhancement of Pacific Threadfin Polydactylus sexfilis in Hawaii: Interactions Between Aquaculture and Fisheries............................................................. 75D. ZiemannAquaculture and Genetic Structure in the Japanese Eel Anguilla japonica..................... 87M. Katoh and M. KobayashiComparative Diets and Growth of Two Scombrid Species, Chub Mackerel Scomber japonicus and Japanese Spanish Mackerel Scomberomorus niphonius, in the Central Seto Inland Sea, Japan.................................. 93J. Shoji, M. Tanaka and Tsutomu Maehara iiiEvaluating Stock Enhancement Strategies: A Multi-disciplinary Approach................... 105T. M. Bert, R.H. McMichael, Jr., R.P. Cody, A. B. Forstchen, W. G. Halstead, K. M. Leber, J. O’Hop, C. L. Neidig, J. M. Ransier, M. D. Tringali, B. L. Winner and F. S. KennedyIII. Physiological and Ecological ApplicationsPredation on Juvenile Chum Salmon Oncorhynchus keta by Fishes and Birds in Rivers and Coastal Oceanic Waters of Japan................................... 127K. Nagasawa and H. KawamuraInteraction Between Cleaner and Host: The Black Porgy Cleaning Behavior of Juvenile Sharpnose Tigerfish Rhyncopelates Oxyrhynchus in the Seto Inland Sea, Western Japan............................................................................. 139T. Shigeta, H. Usuki and K. GushimaIV. Case StudiesAlaska Salmon Enhancement: A Successful Program for Hatchery and Wild Stocks............................................................................................... 149W. HeardNMFS Involvement with Stock Enhancement as a Management Tool........................... 171T. McIlwainStock Enhancement Research with Anadromous and Marine Fishes in South Carolina...................................................................................... 175T. I. J. Smith, W. E. Jenkins, M. R. Denson and M. R. CollinsComparison of Some Developmental, Nutritional, Behavioral and Health Factors Relevant to Stocking of Striped Mullet, (Mugilidae), Sheepshead (Sparidae), Common Snook (Centropomidae) and Nassau Groupers (Serranidae)........................... 191J. W. Tucker Jr. and S. B. KennedyParticipants in the Thirtieth U.S.-Japan Meeting on Aquaculture................. Inside Back Coveriv (PDF has 204 pages.)
  • Enhancing Seed Availability For the Hard Clam (Mercenaria mercenaria) Aquaculture Industry By Applying Remote Setting Techniques

    Sturmer, Leslie; Adams, Charles M.; Supan, John E. (Florida Sea Grant College ProgramGainesville, FL, 2003)
    The goal of this study was to test a technology that may help ensure a reliable and consistentsupply of high quality and inexpensive clam seed to growers, thus fostering an emergingaquaculture industry by eliminating a seed shortage that limits sustainability. The overallobjectives were to develop, test and demonstrate technical procedures and determine thefinancial feasibility of transferring remote setting technology from the Pacific Northwestmolluscan shellfish industry to the hard clam aquaculture industry in Florida. (PDF has 44 pages.)
  • Farm-raised shrimp: good aquacultural practices for product quality and safety

    Otwell, Steve; Garrido, Laura; Garrido, Victor; Benner, Ron (Florida Sea Grant College ProgramGainesville, FL, 2001)
    (PDF has 75 pages)
  • International trade in live, ornamental "fish" in the US & Florida

    Adams, Charles M.; Larkin, Sherry L.; Lee, Donna J.; Degner, Robert L.; Milon, J. Walter (Florida Sea Grant College ProgramGainesville, FL, 2001)
    The importance of international markets as a source of live, ornamental “fish” supply is growing dueto more stringent wild-harvest regulations in Florida. In addition, foreign markets are increasing inimportance as a source of demand for Florida purveyors of live, ornamental “fish”. Florida plays animportant role in this growing international market. Trends in imports and exports of live,ornamental “fish” are described for two primary data sets: U.S. Customs and U.S. Fish and WildlifeService. These trends are described primarily for the 1994-98 period for Florida and the UnitedStates. Florida imports and exports are described for the two major ports: Miami and Tampa. Themost important trading countries are also described. This information will help Florida purveyors oflive, ornamental “fish” better understand the international markets upon which they have becomemore dependent. (PDF has 18 pages)
  • Histological atlas of Florida Surgeonfish (Acanthuridae)

    Tilghman, G. Christopher; Francis-Floyd, Ruth; Klinger, Ruth Ellen (Florida Sea Grant College ProgramGainesville, FL, 2003)
    This histological atlas focuses on A. coeruleus and includesmajor organs and tissues. Particularly note the stomach tissues ofboth species, which illustrate the difference in digestive strategies ofthe Carribbean Acanthurids. Acanthurus chirurgus was intentionallyleft out of this atlas, as its tissues are identical to those of ?A.bahianus(PDF has 22 pages)
  • Aquiculture and Marketing of the Florida Bay Scallop in Crystal River, Florida

    Blake, Norman J.; Adams, Charles; Degner, Robert; Sweat, Don (Florida Sea Grant College ProgramGainesville, FL, 2000)
    The overall goal of this study was to develop a new fishery resource product through open-wateraquaculture for the west coast of Florida that would compete as a non-traditional product through marketdevelopment. Specific objectives were as follows:I. To grow a minimum of 50, 000 juvenile scallops to a minimum market size of40 mm in a cageand float system in the off-shore waters of Crystal River, Florida.2. To determine the growth rate, survival, and time to market size for the individuals in this systemand area to other similar projects like Virginia.3. To introduce local fishermen and the aquaculture students at Crystal River High School to thehatchery, nursery, and grow-out techniques.4. To determine the economic and financial characteristics of bay scallop culture in Florida andassess the sensitivity of projected costs and earnings to changes in key technical, managerial, andmarket related parameters.5. To determine the market acceptability and necessary marketing strategy for whole bay scallopproduct in Florida. (PDF has 99 pages)
  • A Method for siting and prioritizing the removal of derelict vessels in Florida Coastal Waters: test applications in the Florida Keys

    Antonini, Gustav A.; Ryder, R.; Garretson, C. (Florida Sea Grant College ProgramGainesville, FL, 1989)
    Increased boating activities and new waterfront developments have contributed anestimated 3,000 dismantled, abandoned, junked, wrecked, derelict vessels to Floridacoastal waters. This report outlines a method of siting and prioritizing derelict vesselremoval using the Florida Keys as a test area. The data base was information on 240vessels, obtained from Florida Marine Patrol files. Vessel location was plotted on 1:250,000regional and 1:5,000 and 1:12,000 site maps. Type of vessel, length, hull material, engine,fuel tanks, overall condition, afloat and submerged characteristics, and accessibility, wereused to derive parametric site indices of removal priority and removal difficulty.Results indicate 59 top priority cases which should be the focus of immediate cleanup efforts in the Florida Keys. Half of these cases are rated low to moderate in removaldifficulty; the remainder are difficult to remove. Removal difficulty is a surrogate forremoval cost: low difficulty -low cost, high difficulty - high cost. The rating scheme offerscoastal planners options of focusing removal operations either on (1) specific areas withclusters of high priority derelict vessels or on (2) selected targeted derelicts at various,specific locations. (PDF has 59 pages.)
  • Biology and Fishery of Florida's commercial sponges

    Stevely, John; Sweat, Don (Florida Sea Grant College ProgramGainesville, FL, 2000)
    (PDF has 2 pages.)
  • Release techniques for marine fishes

    Novak, Rich (Florida Sea Grant College ProgramGainesville, FL, 2007)
    Proper release of marine fishes has becomeincreasingly important to anglers. The use of fisheriesmanagement tools such as size limits, bag limits andclosed seasons as well as stronger conservation ethicshave resulted in more and more fish being released.In order to maintain healthy fish populations, each angler is responsible for fishing legally, carefullyhandling fish that are hooked and releasing fish thatare not harvested so they can spawn or perhaps becaught again. (PDF contains 4 pages.)

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