Recent Submissions

  • Notes on some specimens of a species of onychophore (Oroperipatus corradoi) new to the fauna of Panama

    Clark, Austin Hobart (Smithsonian InstitutionWashington, D.C., 1914)
    pages 1-3
  • On the relationship of the genus Aulacocarpus, with description of a new Panamanian species

    Pittier, Henri (Smithsonian InstitutionWashington, D.C., 1914)
    pages 1-4
  • Descriptions of new genera and species of microlepidoptera from Panama (with one plate)

    Busck, August (Smithsonian InstitutionWashington, D.C., 1912)
    The following decriptions [sic] of new forms of Microlepidoptera are published in advance of proposed papers, dealing with the lepidopterous fauna of Panama as a whole, based on material collected by the writer as a member of the Smithsonian Biological Survey of the Panama Canal Zone during the first half of the year 1911. ... (PDF contains 13 pages)
  • Biological survey of the Panama Canal Zone (1912)

    Walcott, Charles D. (Government Printing OfficeWashington DC, 1913)
    At first it was intended to confine the collections to the Canal Zone proper, but as the faunal and floral areas extended to the north and south of this region, it was decided to carry the work into the Republic of Panama, a step which met with the hearty approval of that Republic. The work accomplished has been very valuable to science, including collections and observations of vertebrate animals, land and fresh water mollusks, and plants, including flowering plants, grasses and ferns. Special attention will be given during the coming season to vertebrate animals, insects, crustaceans, rotifers and other minute freshwater animals, and also to the microscopic plants known as diatoms. Includes appendix of papers that resulted.
  • A geological survey of Panama (1913)

    Walcott, Charles D. (Government Printing OfficeWashington D.C., 1914)
    The general plan of the surrey comprises a systematic study of the physiography, stratigraphy and structural geology, geologic history, geologic correlation, mineral resources(including coal, oil, and other fields), petrography and paleontology of the Canal Zone, and of as much of the adjacent areas of the Isthmian region as is feasible.
  • Biological Survey of the Panama Canal Zone (1911)

    Walcott, Charles D (Government Printing OfficeWashington D.C., 1912)
    With the cooperation of several of the executive departments, and of the Field Museum of Natural History, a party of about 10 naturalists was accordingly sent to the zone, and the results so far accomplished have been very satisfactory. Large collections of biological material have been received, including specimens of a considerable number of genera and species new to science. It also seemed important to determine exactly the geographical distribution of the various organisms inhabiting the Isthmus, which is one of the routes by which the animals and plants of South America have entered North America and vice versa. The estimated cost of the survey whichwould have to be met by the Institution is $11,000...
  • Biological survey of the Panama Canal Zone

    Walcott, Charles D. (Government Printing OfficeWashington D.C., 1911)
    exhaustive biological survey of the Panama Canal Zone-will be undertaken in the winter of 1910-11. A part of the fresh-water streams of the Isthmus of Panama empty into the Atlantic Ocean and others into the Pacific Ocean. It is known that a certain number of animals and plants in the streams on the Atlantic side are different from those of the Pacific side, but as no exact biological survey has ever been undertaken the extent and magnitude of these differences have yet to be learned. When the canal is completed the organisms of the various watersheds will be offered a ready means of mingling together, the natural distinctions now existing will be obliterated....
  • The Panama Canal Zone: an epochal event in sanitation

    Adams, Charles Francis (Massachusetts Historical SocietyBoston, 1911)
    An account of events of the Panama Canal Zone in 1911 by the author, C.F. Adams. (38 page document)
  • The Fossil higher plants from the Canal Zone

    Berry, Edward W. (Govt. Printing OfficeWashington, DC, 1918)
    Fossil flora described in the present report is too limited for purposes of exact correlation, which may be expected to be settled by the marine faunas present at most horizons in the Isthmian region. Accompanying table of distribution will show that from the oldest (Hohio) to the youngest (Gatun) plant-bearing formations there is no observable difference in floral facies. This so-called Oligocence series of formations does not represent any great interval of time. (39 page document)
  • Report on fresh-water copepoda from Panama, with descriptions of new species

    Marsh, Charles Dwight (Smithsonian InstitutionWashington, D.C., 1913)
    These collections were made by Meek and Hildebrand, in connection with their work on fishes in the seasons of 1911 and 1912, by Goldman in 1912, and by Marsh who was present in Panama for four weeks in 1912 for the express purpose of making such collections. Most of the collections were made within the limits of the Canal Zone. A few collections were made in eastern Colombia, some on Rio Bayana and its tributaries, some on the Chagres and Trinidad outside the Zone and some in the neighborhood of Chorrera and of old Panama... (Document has 33 pages)
  • Two new subspecies of birds from the slopes of Mount Pirri, eastern Panama

    Nelson, Edward W. (Smithsonian InstitutionWashington, D.C., 1913)
    The two subspecies described below were part of the rich collection made by E. A. Goldman in Eastern Panama, during the season of 1912, while engaged in the Smithsonian Biological Survey of Panama. Other new birds from this collection were described in a recent paper...(Document contains 4 pages)
  • Descriptions of twelve new species and subspecies of mammals from Panama

    Goldman, Edward Alphonso (Smithsonian InstitutionWashington, D.C., 1912)
    In the early part of 1911 a collection of 368 mammals was made by me while engaged in the biological survey of the Canal Zone, and adjacent parts of Panama, undertaken by the Smithsonian Institution in cooperation with several government departments, including the War Department and Department of Agriculture. This collection, representing between 40 and 50 genera, includes 12 new species and subspecies which are here published in advance of a general report on the mammals of the region...(Document contains 13 pages)
  • Descriptions of new mammals from Panama and Mexico

    Goldman, Edward Alphonso (Smithsonian InstitutionWashington, D.C., 1913)
    Further study of the collection of mammals taken by the writer while detailed from the Biological Survey, U.S. Department of Agriculture, to the Smithsonian Biological Survey of the Panama Canal Zone has resulted in the discovery of eleven new species and subspecies in addition to those already published...(Document contains 22 pages.)
  • New mammals from eastern Panama

    Goldman, Edward A. (Smithsonian InstitutionWashington, D.C., 1912)
    During the early part of the present year I was again detailed from the Biological Survey, U. S. Department of Agriculture to field work in connection with the Smithsonian Biological Survey of the Panama Canal Zone. Additional collections of mammals and birds were made in January and February in the Canal Zone. From the latter part of February to near the end of June work was carried on in eastern Panama to determine the faunal relation of the region to the Canal Zone and the better known areas to the westward and northward. The work was centered in the Pirri range of mountains which rises to a height of over 5,000 feet near the Colombian boundary southeast of San Miguel Bay...(Document contains 20 pages)
  • Descriptions of new genera, species and subspecies of birds from Panama, Colombia, and Ecuador

    Nelson, Edward W. (Smithsonian InstitutionWashington, D.C., 1912)
    The first of January, 1912, E. A. Goldman, of the Biological Survey, Department of Agriculture, was again detailed on the Smithsonian Biological Survey of the Canal Zone. He returned to Panama in January and remained there until the last of June passing most of this period in collecting birds and mammals on the slopes of Mount Pirri on the Pacific side of eastern Panama, near the Colombian border...(Document contains 27 pages)
  • A Remarkable new fern from Panama

    Maxon, William R. (Smithsonian InstitutionWashington, D.C., 1911)
    Toward the last of February, 1911, in the course of fieldwork connected with the Smithsonian Biological Survey of the Panama Canal Zone, I accompanied Mr. Henry Pittier from the Canal Zone, where our work had been carried on up to that time, to Chiriqui, the westernmost province of Panama, and spent nearly all of March in collecting plants--mainly ferns and lower cryptogams--in the mountains north of David, the principal city of the province...(Document contains 10 pages)
  • Three new club-mosses from Panama

    Maxon, William R. (Smithsonian InstitutionWashington, D.C., 1912)
    In a previous paper relating to a singular new fern (Polypodium podocarpum) from Panama, I have described very briefly the mountian (sp) region above David in the province of Chiriqui, and have referred in particular to a most interesting collecting trip of three days which I took from El Boquete over "Holcomb's trail" along the Rio Caldera to "Camp I" and to the summit of the Continental Divide a few miles farther on...(Document contains 9 pages)
  • Two new subspecies of birds from Panama

    Nelson, Edward W. (Smithsonian InstitutionWashington, D.C., 1911)
    While working on the Smithsonian Biological Survey of the Canal Zone, Mr. E. A. Goldman of the Biological Survey, United States Department of Agriculture, collected specimens of two undescribed subspecies of birds which are characterized below. (Document contains 3 pages)
  • A new Kingfisher from Panama

    Goldman, Edward Alphonso (Smithsonian InstitutionWashington, D.C., 1911)
    Among the birds obtained in the course of the Smithsonian Biological Survey of Panama are 28 kingfishers of the Ceryle americana group. Comparison of this large series, and examination of the birds from numerous localities in northern South America and within the wide distribution area (Panama to southern United States) originally assigned to Ceryle septentrionalis Sharpe, show that two well-marked races have been united under this name...(Document contains 4 pages)
  • Descriptions of two new species of nun birds from Panama

    Nelson, Edward W. (Smithsonian InstitutionWashington, D.C., 1912)
    Two new species of Monasa are among the interesting birds collected by E. A. Goldman while working on the Smithsonian Biological Survey of Panama during the winter of 1911. They were collected at the same locality on the base of Cerro Azul, northwest from Chepo, and only a single specimen of each was obtained. No others were seen during the entire season in the Canal Zone and adjacent territory...(Document contains 4 pages)

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