• A report on the fisheries of Uganda investigated by the Cambridge Expedition to the East African Lakes, 1930-31

      Worthington, E.B. (Crown Agents for the ColoniesLondon, 1932)
      There was very little previous information to use as a basis for work on Lakes Edward and George, but fortunately the region had been mapped in some detail by the Uganda-Congo Boundary Commission of 1906-08. This map served as a satisfactory foundation, but the western Congo shoreline of Lake Edward was inserted only by a dotted line, and a number of inaccuracies, particularly with regard to the islands and littoral of L. George, came to light during our survey.
    • A Report on the Fisheries of Uganda Investigated by the Cambridge Expedition to the East African Lakes, 1930-31 with 3 Appendices, 5 Maps and 21 Other Illustrations

      Worthington, E.B.; Zoological Laboratory, Cambridge (Zoological LaboratoryCambridge, 1932-06)
      Previous Information. There was very little previous information to use as a basis for work on Lakes Edward and George, but fortunately the region had been mapped in some detail by the Uganda-Congo Boundary Commission of 1906-08. This map served as a satisfactory foundation, but the western Congo shoreline of Lake Edward was inserted only by a dotted line, and a number of inaccuracies, particularly with regard to the islands and littoral of L. George, came to light during our survey. Furthermore. The shorelines of all the African lakes are undergoing rapid changes, particularly in those parts where the littorals are flat and sandy and where wind and wave action cause the growth of sand spits and bars. By these means considerable changes have taken place along the low-lying south-east shore of Lake Edward during the period from 1908-31). With regard to depths, practically nothing was known beyond the fact that a rough line of soundings down the Kazinga Channel, recently made by the Kenya and Uganda railway, had shown that there is sufficient, water for steamer navigation along this route. It was generally supposed that both Lakes Edward and George were very shallow. The fauna and flora had not been studied in any detail, though some fishes, etc., had been collected by Professor Moore and other naturalists who passed these lakes en route for other parts, and shore shells had been collected by Capt. Pitman. The expedition, therefore, was left a practically open field for geographical and biological work.
    • Annual Report of the Game Department for the year ended 31st December, 1935

      Game Department, Uganda Protectorate (Game Department, Uganda ProtectorateEntebbe, Uganda, 1936)
      The fisheries section of the Annual report provides information on the following:Development and Control of the Victoria Nyanza Fishing Industry, Preparation of StatisticsStatistical Tables:(A) Number of half yearly licences issued;(B) Quantities of nets imported;(0) Dried fish landed from Sese and Kome;(D) Dried fish imported from Mwanza ;(E) Dried fish exported to Belgian Congo;Lake BunyonyiLake MutandaLake MureyheLake Mugisha (or Raiyumbu)I,ake SakaLake WamalaCommercial Development:(i) Lake Albert: (ii) Lake Edward(iii) Other Waters(iv) Nsonzi Fishery, Kigezi(v) IntroductionsExperimental Nets and fisheries legislation
    • Annual Report of the Game Department for the year ended 31st December 1938

      Game Department, Uganda Protectorate (Game Department, Uganda ProtectorateEntebbe, Uganda, 1939)
      The annual report presents information on the following under fisheries sectionBreaches of Game Laws (Fish Sections)Development and Control of the Lake Victoria Fishing Industry.Collection of StatisticsStatistical Tables.-(A) Number of half-yearly licences issued(B) Quantities and value of nets imported(C) Dried fish handled by Railways and Steamers(D) Smoked and salted fish exported to the Belgian CongoMpondwe Customs PostLake Bunyonyi Lake Mugisha (or Kaiyumbu)Lake ChahafiLake MuleheLake MutandaLake SakaLake NabugaboLake Kachira and Lake KijanebalolaLake KyogaCommercial Development:-Lake Edward and associated fisheriesUganda Fisheries LimitedNsonzi Fishery, KigeziExperimental Nets in Lake VictoriaLegislation (B) angling a) Trout (b) Nile pereh or mpufa
    • Report no. 1 (1944)

      Cape of Good Hope (South Africa). Inland Fisheries Department. (Provincial Administration of the Cape of Good Hope, Inland Fisheries DepartmentCape Town, South Africa, 1945)
      As the nature of the inland waters of a country is dependent upon its geography and geology, a brief description of the physical features of the Cape Province follows as an introduction to this report. The Cape Province covers an area of 277,200 square miles, which is approximately 60% of the total area of the Union of South Africa. It has a rugged coastline of approximately 1,600 miles, which is washed by the cold Atlantic Ocean on the west, and the warmer Indian Ocean on the east. In the north it is partly bounded by the Orange River and Basutoland. The boundary with Natal is formed by the Umtamvuna and Urnzimkulu river system. Occupying a position between latitudes 240 40' and 340 50' south, it is well within the Temperate Zone. Geologically, the Province is composed by the Karoo System; a large tract of older granites and gneiss in the north-west; the Cape System; smaller areas of the Transvaal and Nama Systems and scattered outcrops of younger granites and the Cretaceous System. Large areas are covered by windblown or shrub-covered sand. Physically, the Province can be divided into a series of plains shelving
    • East African Inland Fisheries Research Organization Annual Report for the year 1948

      East African Inland Fisheries Research Organization (East African Inland Fisheries Research OrganizationJinja, Uganda, 1949)
      IntroductionThe laboratory at Jinja is being developed as a centre forhydro-biological research in East Africa, It has been built and is at present wholly financed from a grant from the Central Research allocation of the Colonial Development Fund. The building contains six laboratories in addition to a library, common room and general office. A maximumnumber of ten research workers could be given laboratory accommodation. However, shortage of living accommodation will limit the numbers who can work here for the next year or two.
    • Annual Report of the Game Department for the year ended 31st December, 1947

      Game Department, Uganda Protectorate (Game Department, Uganda ProtectorateEntebbe, Uganda, 1949)
      ) General (2) Legislation (3) Nets (4) Imports and Exports of Dried Fish (B) Economic:-(I) Lake Victoria (2) Lake Albert (including the Albert Nile(3) Lake Edward and Associated Fisheries (4) Lake Kyoga (5) Minor Lakes, Dams and the Victoria Nile (6) Introductions (7) Fish Transfers (8) Crocodiles:-(C) AnglingTrout Nile Perch BarbelTilapia Variabilis
    • Annual Report of the Game Department for the year ended 31st December 1949

      Game Department, Uganda Protectorate (Game Department, Uganda ProtectorateEntebbe, Uganda, 1950)
      The fisheries section of the Annual report provides information on the following:(1) General information(2) Legislation(3) Nets(4) Imports and Exports of Dried FishB) Economic:-(1) Lake Victoria(2) Lake Albert (including the Albert Nile)(3) Report by Lake Albert Fisheries Officer(4) Lake Edward and Associated Fisheries(5) Lake Kyoga(6) Minor Lakes and the Victoria Nile(7) Dams and(8)Fish Transfers
    • East African Inland Fisheries Research Organization Annual Report for year ended 31st December 1949

      East African Inland Fisheries Research Organization (East African Inland Fisheries Research OrganizationJinja, Uganda, 1950)
      The present work is now concentrated mainly on the Tilapia fishery. As a result of past experience it is easier to direct efforts in a way likely to give useful results. Work on the Tilapia is now beyond the purely exploratory stage and these fishing experiments are being carried but in areas which are known to contain large numbers of Tilapia. Nets of different mesh size are being used in order to catch all stages of these fish. These nets are being fished at the surface and at the bottom, close to the shore and further out. The data collected should provide more precise information regarding the periodic migration, both vertical and horizontal, of these fish, a better understanding of their life history and breeding habits, and indicate' the potential possibilities of this fishery. These data should explain the variation in numbers of fish caught by Africans during different months of the year; they should also make it possible to determine more exactly the best type of net for use in this particular fishery.
    • Annual Report of the Game Department for the year ended 31st December, 1948

      Game Department, Uganda Protectorate (Game Department, Uganda ProtectorateEntebbe, Uganda, 1950)
      Fisheries section of the annual report covers the followingA. ADMINISTRATION(1) General, (2) Legislation, (3) Nets(4) Imports and Exports of Dried Fish, (B) ECONOMIC :(1) Lake Victoria, (2) Lake Albert (including the Albert Nile), (3) Lake Edward and Associated Fisheries, (4) Report by Fish Culturist, (5) Lake Kyoga, (6) Minor Lakes and the Victoria Nile, (7) Dams,(8) Introductions,(9) Fish Transfers(10) Crocodiles:(i) Control,(ii) Industry, (iii) General(ll) General Notes, (C) ANGLING:Trout, Nile PerchBarbei, Tilapia variabilis.
    • Report no. 8 (1951)

      Cape of Good Hope. Inland Fisheries Department (Provincial Administration of the Cape of Good Hope, Inland Fisheries DepartmentCape Town, South Africa, 1951)
      Since 1875 scientists have known that galvanic currents affect fish. With the large-scale generation of electricity by water power it was observed that when two wires, coupled to a dynamo, were placed in water, the fish were attracted to the positive wire.The question therefore arose whether this phenomenon could be applied practically in the construction of a "Fish Catcher" to be used where the usual methods of catching fish, such as netting, were inapplicable. Since 1916 investigators in Germany, Russia and Japan have been working in this direction. They soon discovered, however. that if fish are to be caught alive, only a direct current can be used. Alternating currents not only damage the central nervous system of the fish, but cause such Contractions of the muscles that the ribs are tom from the spine
    • East African Fisheries Research Organization Annual Report 1950

      East African Fisheries Research Organization (East Africa High CommissionNairobi, Kenya, 1951)
      The annual report presents progress on research activities carried by the organization during the reporting period.The general policy was to integrate the work of every individual on the staff so that all consider themselves members of a scientific team, and so that new problems as they arise could be investigated from more than one aspect. Already some of important findings had arisen as a result of joint studies made by two or more members of the staff working together. As far as possible the work being undertaken was designed to cover the sequence of events which lead from the chemical and physical condition of the water to the ultimate growth of the various populations of fish.
    • Annual report of the Game and Fisheries Department for the year ended 31st December 1951

      Game and Fisheries Department (Command of His Exellency the GovernorEntebbe, Uganda, 1951)
      Last year a very full report was written to mark the beginning of the second quarter century of the life of this Department, and to place on permanent record as detailed an account as is possible in a report of this nature, of the general game and fisheries situation in the Protectorate at the beginning of the new period. It is not intended that this report shall be as full, and to avoid unnecessary repetition, it should be read, where necessary, in conjunction with the 1950 Annual Report.
    • Annual Report of the Game and Fisheries Department for the year ended 31st December, 1950

      Game and Fisheries Department, Uganda Protectorate (Game and Fisheries DepartmentEntebbe, Uganda, 1951)
      The Game Warden proceeded on leave pending retirement at the end of August after nearly 26 years as Game Warden of Uganda (see also paragraphs 379 to 383). The headquarters staff, which had b en augmented by the arrival of an Assistant Game Warden in November, 194-9, was thus again reduced to only one officer for the last four months of the year which was a great handicap. A supernumerary Game Ranger was authorized, to fill the gap, but owing to the tedious procedure of recruitment he had not materialized by the end of the year
    • A survey of research and scientific services in East Africa, 1947-56

      Worthington, E. B. (East Africa High CommissionMuguga, Kenya, 1952)
      This "Survey of Research and Scientific Services in East Arica 1947-1956" has been prepared by Dr. E. B. Worthington, who held the post of Scientific Secretary in the Office of the Chief Secretary to the East African Governor's Conference and subsequently in the Administrator's Office of the East Mrica High Commission during the period January, 1947-May, 1951. Dr. Worthington is now Secretary General of the Scientific Council for, Arica South of the Sahara
    • Report on the tilapia and other fish and fisheries of Lake Nyasa 1945-1947

      Lowe, Rosemary H. (Her Majesty's Stationery OfficeLondon, 1952)
      The 1938-39 Fishery survey found that the Tilapia are the most important commercial fish in Lake Nyasa, and unless the fishery is damaged by over-fishing, they are likely to remain so.They concluded that the existing fisheries were not exhausting the supply of fish and that anincrease in fisheries would be possible without damaging the stock, but stressed that it was vitally important that any enlargement in the fisheries should be carried out under the controlof some officer fully competent to judge the effect of the extension (1942 Report, p. 92). Duringthe war years important changes have taken plenty. The large scale fishing by European andIndian firms in the South-east arm of the lake has developed considerably, and during the pastfew years there has been a widespread shortage of the main inshore-living commercial speciesof Tilapia. During this work it has become clear that the Tilapia form a series of speciesinhabiting inshore to open waters, and it seems that in recent years the balance of the differentspecies has changed, inshore-living species becoming scarce and open water species beingplentiful. This is probably due in part to the high lake level in recent years, but it seemscertain from this study that local overfishing of some of the Tilapia species has occurred in partsof the lake and that serious steps must be taken to help the stocks if the damage is not to proceed.
    • East African Fisheries Research Organization Annual Report 1952

      East African Fisheries Research Organization (East Africa High CommissionNairobi, Kenya, 1952)
      Several important advances have been made in our knowledge both regarding the factors which determine fertility in tropical lakes and the fish that live in them. As a result of our investigations a new theory has been put forward regarding the part played by animals in the bionomics of a lake; this theory, stated somewhat baldly, is that within certain limits the greater the number of animals in a shallow tropical lake, the greater becomes its potential fertility, and therefore the greater the number of animals it can support. The theory arises as a logical conclusion, once we accept the fact that the rate of production in such a lake is determined by the rate at which organic matter is decomposed. Bottom deposits which consist mainly of vegetable matter decompose slowly, whereas deposits which contain a high proportion of matter of animal origin decompose more rapidly. Thus the more animals in a lake, particularly animals which feed on plant material, the faster the biological cycle can proceed and the greater the density of animals it can support. This new concept will have a very profound influence on our ideas concerning the consequences of overfishing tropical waters. It also shows that efforts must be made to encourage and protect all herbivorous and detritus feeding animals, whether they be copepods, fish, or hippopotami, and whether they are of immediate economic importance or not.
    • East African Fisheries Research Organization Annual Report 1951

      East African Fisheries Research Organization (East Africa High CommissionNairobi, Kenya, 1952)
      The examination of a considerable amount of data has led to the conclusion that Lake Victoria should be considered as many lakes within a lake. This is not a vague and seemingly obvious remark based on the superficial observation that it is a very large lake containing numerous islands and with a highly indented coastline, and therefore providing variable local conditions. Such local conditions would exist in any lake whose basin departed from a simple geometric form. But evidence has now been collected to show that really significant differences occur between different regions within the lake. These differences are apparent from a variety of data, including the nature of the bottom deposits, the chemical and hydrological condition of the water, the amount and kind of plankton and the distribution and abundance of the fauna. Our findings are as yet somewhat sketchy, and it will be a long time before it will be possible to draw an adequate picture of the various regions of the lake; it is however, of great value to have reached a position enabling us to form this general concept. The most striking and definite evidence is derived, as might be expected, from hydrological data. Details of this work are contained in the hydrological section of this report. Any data recorded below should be considered as applying only to the particular areas mentioned. In other words it would, to draw an obvious example be wrong to suppose that because fish grow at a particular rate in one part of the lake they will grow at the same rate or to the same size in other regions of the lake.
    • East African Fisheries Research Organization Annual Report 1953

      East African Fisheries Research Organization (East African Fisheries Research OrganizationJinja, Uganda., 1953)
      The Annual report covers research carried out during the reporting period 1953 and contains the following Hydrology , Algology , Swamps, Snails and snail-eating Haplochromis, Tilapia Haplochromis, Mormyrus, Protopterus , Fish Physiology and list of Publications by members of E.A.F.R.O.
    • Annual Report of the Game and Fisheries Department for the year ended 31st December 1952

      Game and Fisheries Department, Uganda Protectorate (Game and Fisheries DepartmentEntebbe, Uganda, 1953)
      The annual report presents information on Lake Victoria, Lake Albert (including tbe Albert Nile and associated Fisheries)-Report by Lake Albert Fisheries Officer,Lake Kyoga and Waters of Eastern Uganda-Report by Fisheries Officer, Serere. Lakes George, Edward and Waters of Western Uganda -Report by the Fisheries Officer, Kichwamba Fish Farming-Report by the Fisheries Officer, Fish Fanning,dams,crocodiles. It presents information on angaling, Trouting, Nile Perch and Ripon Falls Barbel