• DOE Coastal Ocean Program: "Assimilation and Transfer of Carbon in Oligotrophic and Eutrophic Coastal Water Columns" Data Report: CTD and Hydrographic Data, R/V Pelican Cruise no. 92-10, October 19-27, 1992.

      Toon, R.; Dagg, Michael J. (Louisiana Universities Marine ConsortiumChauvin, LA, 1992-12)
      Water column processes were examined in two environments within the continental margin of the northern Gulf of Mexico. Location I was at the shelf break and location II was at the inner to mid shelf. Each location was first characterized by a brief mapping exercise with the ship's flow-through monitoring system called MIDAS. This system monitors surface water conditions of temperature, salinity, chlorophyll fluorescence and light transmission. Each is plotted as a function of the ship's cruise track, providing a real time image of surface water properties. CTD profiles provided vertical resolution at selected sites. At each location, the information provided by the mapping output and CTD was used to select a location for deployment of a floating sediment trap array. At the slope location, traps were set at 65 m and 90 m. At the inner shelf station, traps were set for 17 m and 25 m. In both cases, water column processes in the vicinity of the drifting trap array were characterized over a 2 day deployment. During each trap deployment, depth profiles of temperature, salinity, chlorophyll and nutrient concentrations were made several times a day. Process measurements included phytoplankton primary production, P I properties and growth rate, bacterial production, water column respiration, microzooplankton grazing (2 methods), and mesozooplankton grazing (2 methods). At each location, additional water column measurements included: DOC profiles; quantification of dissolved carbohydrates; isolation and characterization of dissolved organic matter; phytoplankton pigments; irradiance profiles; and POC/PON. A budget of water column processes will be constructed at each of the two environmentally distinct deployment sites to determine carbon inputs, rates of recycling and fates within the upper water column.
    • DOE Coastal Ocean Program: Cruise in Support of Proposal Titled "Assimilation and Transfer of Carbon in Oligotrophic and Eutrophic Coastal Water Columns", Data Report: CTD and Hydrographic Data, R/V Pelican Cruise no. PE930504, May 5 - May 13, 1993.

      Toon, R.; Dagg, Michael J. (Louisiana Universities Marine ConsortiumChauvin, LA, 1993-08)
      Water column processes were examined in two environments within the continental margin of the northern Gulf of Mexico. Location I was at the shelf break/slope and location II was at an inner to mid shelf location. Each location was first characterized by a brief mapping exercise done with the ship's flow-through monitoring system called MIDAS. This system monitors surface water conditions of temperature, salinity, chlorophyll fluorescence and light transmission. Each is plotted as a function of the ship's cruise track, providing a real time image of surface water properties. CTD profiles were used to provide vertical resolution at selected sites during the map. At each location, the information provided by the mapping output and CTD drops was used to select a location for deployment of a floating sediment trap array. Traps were set for 2 depths. At the slope location, traps were set for 65 m and 90 m. At the inner shelf station, traps were set for 17 m and 25 m. At the slope station, water column processes at the trap site was measured over a 3 day duration during which the trap array was tracked by the vessel. At the mid-shelf site, the traps were deployed for two days. During each trap deployment, hydrographic measurements were measured four times a day with the CTD. Depth profiles of chlorophyll and nutrient concentrations were made for each cast. Process measurements included phytoplankton production and P vs. I curves, bacterial production, water column respiration, microzooplankton grazing (2 methods), and mesozooplankton grazing (2 methods). At each location, additional water column measurements included: DOC profiles; quantification of dissolved carbohydrates; and isolation and characterization of dissolved organic matter. A budget of water column processes will be compared with vertical flux measured by sediment traps at each site to determine what fraction of production is recycled within the photic zone and whether recycling efficiency varies between sites.
    • Hydrographic, biological, and nutrient characteristics of the water column in the Mississippi River Delta Bight, June, 1985 to December, 1985

      Rabalais, Nancy N.; Turner, R. Eugene; Wiseman, William J., Jr.; Boesch, Donald F. (Louisiana Universities Marine ConsortiumChauvin, LA, 1986-07)
      In June 1985, a focused study was initiated to assess the spatial and temporal extent, intensity, and potential causes of oxygen depletion in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Hypoxic bottom waters were studied along two transects (one off Cat Island Pass near Cocodrie and one off Belle Pass off Port Fourchon) in the Mississippi River Delta Bight area. Eight 2-day cruises were conducted aboard the R/V R.J. Russell or the R/V Pelican along these two transects between mid-June and mid-October. Sampling was most intense (bi-weekly) from mid-June through early September. A reduced sampling scheme (4 stations along the Cat Island Pass transect) was continued through the end of the year. In addition, two shelf-wide cruises were conducted from the Mississippi River to the Texas border during July and September.
    • Hydrographic, biological, and nutrient characteristics of the water column on the Louisiana shelf during 1988

      Rabalais, Nancy N.; Turner, R. Eugene; Wiseman, William J., Jr.; Boesch, Donald F. (Louisiana Universities Marine ConsortiumChauvin, LA, 1989-03)
      Since 1985, several research cruises were conducted by our research team to assess the spatial and temporal extent, intensity, and potential causes of oxygen depletion in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Hypoxic bottom waters were studied along two transects in and near the Mississippi River Delta Bight in 1985 and 1986. In addition, shelf-wide cruises were conducted from the Mississippi River to the Texas border during July of 1985, 1986, and 1987. These cruises have provided us with exhaustive information concerning the temporal and spatial variability associated with the phenomenon of hypoxia on the Louisiana shelf. It was not our intent to continue assessment-type cruises during 1988. Opportunities existed, however, in conjunction with other research cruises and the LUMCON summer program to re-occupy stations along Transect C off Cat Island Pass near Cocodrie. In addition, the drought conditions in the upper Mississippi River basin during the spring and summer of 1988 resulted in a significant reduction in the flow rate of the Mississippi River. We were therefore compelled to conduct a shelf-wide cruise during mid-summer of 1988 to document the hydrographic conditions of the Louisiana shelf under low flow conditions of the Mississippi River and to assess the effects of this low flow on the phenomenon of hypoxia.The cruises along Transect C were conducted on board the R/V Pelican as part of a research effort named LaSER for data in April and as part of the LUMCON summer program for the remainder. The shelf-wide cruise was conducted on board the R/V Acadiana from August 12 through August 16, 1988.
    • Hydrographic, biological, and nutrient characteristics of the water column on the Louisiana shelf, July and September, 1985

      Rabalais, Nancy N.; Turner, R. Eugene; Wiseman, William J., Jr.; Boesch, Donald F. (Louisiana Universities Marine ConsortiumChauvin, LA, 1986-07)
      In June 1985, a focused study was initiated to assess the spatial and temporal extent, intensity, and potential causes of oxygen depletion in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Two shelf-wide, quasi-synoptic cruises were conducted from the Mississippi River to the Texas border during mid-July and early September, 1985. Cruises were conducted aboard the R/V Pelican on 15-20 July and 10-13 September. Stations were occupied along ten transects in 5 to 80 m water depth. Stations for Pelican Cruise I extended farther offshore and farther to the west than those for Pelican Cruise II. In addition to these shelf-wide cruises, hypoxic bottom waters were studied more frequently along two transects in the Mississippi River Delta Bight area.
    • Hydrographic, biological, and nutrient characteristics of the water column on the Louisiana shelf, July, 1986

      Rabalais, Nancy N.; Turner, R. Eugene; Wiseman, William J., Jr.; Boesch, Donald F. (Louisiana Universities Marine ConsortiumChauvin, LA, 1989-03)
      In June 1985, a focused study was initiated to assess the spatial and temporal extent, intensity, and potential causes of oxygen depletion in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Hypoxic bottom waters were studied along two transects (one off Cat Island Pass near Cocodrie and one off Belle Pass near Port Fourchon). These cruises were continued in 1986 but on a single transect (see LUMCON Data Report No. 6). In addition, a shelf-wide cruise was conducted from the Mississippi River to the Texas border during July, 1986. Stations occupied during this cruise were similar to those sampled during shelf-wide cruises in 1985. The intent of these cruises was to provide comparative information on the temporal variability of oxygen-depleted bottom waters on the Louisiana shelf.The first part of the cruise was conducted on the R/V Acadiana between July 7 and July 10. Rough seas prevented continuation on the smaller ship. The remaining stations were sampled from on board the R/V Pelican between July 16 and July 17. While not synoptic in coverage, a few mid-depth stations were reoccupied during the second leg and hydrographic conditions were similar on the two dates.
    • Hydrographic, biological, and nutrient characteristics of the water column on the Louisiana shelf, July, 1987

      Rabalais, Nancy N.; Turner, R. Eugene; Wiseman, William J., Jr.; Boesch, Donald F. (Louisiana Universities Marine ConsortiumChauvin, LA, 1989-03)
      Beginning in 1985, several research cruises were conducted by our research team to assess the spatial and temporal extent, intensity, and potential causes of oxygen depletion in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Hypoxic bottom waters were studied along two transects in and near the Mississippi River Delta Bight in 1985 and 1986. In addition, shelf-wide cruises were conducted from the Mississippi River to the Texas border during July of both years. The intent of these cruises was to provide comparative information on the temporal variability of oxygen-depleted bottom waters on the Louisiana shelf.The bi-weekly cruises along the southeastern Louisiana shelf were discontinued in 1987. A shelf-wide cruise, however, was conducted in July, 1987 to continue the studies of temporal variability on the Louisiana shelf. The cruise was conducted on the R/V Pelican from July 1 through July 5.
    • Hydrographic, biological, and nutrient characteristics of the water column on the southeastern Louisiana coast, January, 1986 to November, 1986

      Rabalais, Nancy N.; Turner, R. Eugene; Wiseman, William J., Jr.; Boesch, Donald F. (Louisiana Universities Marine ConsortiumChauvin, LA, 1989-03)
      In June 1985, a focused study was initiated to assess the spatial and temporal extent, intensity, and potential causes of oxygen depletion in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Hypoxic bottom waters were studied along two transects (one off Cat Island Pass near Cocodrie and one off Belle Pass near Port Fourchon). The number of transects was reduced to one in 1986 (Transect C off Cat Island Pass) and the number of sample periods increased. Sixteen cruises were conducted aboard the R/V Acadiana or the R/V Pelican between late January and mid-November, 1986. Sampling was most intense (bi-weekly) from mid-April through late September. A reduced sampling scheme (four stations) was followed for the first two cruises. In addition a shelf-wide cruise was conducted from the Mississippi River to the Texas border during July, 1986.
    • LaSER oceanography: Data report number 1, R/V Pelican cruise, July 21-August 1, 1987, CTD and hydrographic data

      Murrell, Michael C.; Dagg, Michael J. (Louisiana Universities Marine ConsortiumChauvin, LA, 1987-12)
      The LaSER oceanography program is a five year multi-institutional and multi-investigator program titled "Oceanographic Processes on Continental Shelves Influenced by Large Rivers." Funding for this program began in January, 1987.The scientific goals of this program are: a) investigations on a large spatial scale, from the Mississippi River delta to some far field (down-plume) location, to examine biological responses to riverine inputs of dissolved nutrients, suspended sediments, and fresh water; b) investigations on small spatial scales, both horizontally and vertically, in a cross plume direction to examine the role of oceanographic fronts, convergences, and discontinuities in biological production; and c) investigations on small temporal scales, particularly to examine the biological responses to the passage of winter storms.This report summarizes the CTD and hydrographic (bottle) data from the first LaSER oceanography cruise.
    • LaSER oceanography: Data report number 2, R/V Pelican cruise, April 16-24, 1988, CTD, hydrographic, and light data

      Murrell, Michael C.; Dagg, Michael J. (Louisiana Universities Marine ConsortiumChauvin, LA, 1988-09)
      The LaSER oceanography program is a five year multi-institutional and multi-investigator program titled "Oceanographic Processes on Continental Shelves Influenced by Large Rivers." Funding for this program began in January, 1987.The scientific goals of this program are: a) investigations on a large spatial scale, from the Mississippi River delta to some far field (down-plume) location, to examine biological responses to riverine inputs of dissolved nutrients, suspended sediments, and fresh water; b) investigations on small spatial scales, both horizontally and vertically, in a cross plume direction to examine the role of oceanographic fronts, convergences, and discontinuities in biological production; and c) investigations on small temporal scales, particularly to examine the biological responses to the passage of winter storms.This report summarizes the CTD, hydrographic, and light data from the second LaSER oceanography cruise.
    • LaSER Oceanography: Data Report Number 3, R/V Pelican Cruise, April 10-22, 1989, CTD and Hydrographic Data

      Toon, R.; Dagg, Michael J. (Louisiana Universities Marine ConsortiumChauvin, LA, 1989-10)
      This five year multi-institutional and multi-investigator program is entitled "Oceanographic Processes on Continental Shelves Influenced by Large Rivers." Funding began in January, 1987. The scientific goals of this program are a) investigations on a large spatial scale, from the Mississippi River delta to some far field (down-plume) location, to examine biological responses to riverine inputs of dissolved nutrients, suspended sediments, and fresh water; b) investigations on small spatial scales, both horizontally and vertically, in a cross plume direction to examine the role of oceanographic fronts, convergences, and discontinuities in biological production; and c) investigations on small temporal scales, particularly to examine the biological responses to the passage of winter storms. This report summarizes the CTD and hydrographic data from the third LaSER oceanography cruise, for the Mississippi River plume region west of the delta.
    • LaSER Oceanography: Data Report Number 4, R/V Pelican Cruise, September 20-27, 1989, CTD and Hydrographic Data

      Toon, R.; Dagg, Michael J. (Louisiana Universities Marine ConsortiumChauvin, LA, 1990-01)
      This five year multi-institutional and multi-investigator program is entitled "Oceanographic Processes on Continental Shelves Influenced by Large Rivers." Funding began in January, 1987. The scientific goals of this program are a) investigations on a large spatial scale, from the Mississippi River delta to some far field (down-plume) location, to examine biological responses to riverine inputs of dissolved nutrients, suspended sediments, and fresh water; b) investigations on small spatial scales, both horizontally and vertically, in a cross plume direction to examine the role of oceanographic fronts, convergences, and discontinuities in biological production; and c) investigations on small temporal scales, particularly to examine the biological responses to the passage of winter storms. This report summarizes the CTD and hydrographic data from the fourth LaSER oceanography cruise, for the Mississippi River plume region west of the delta.
    • LaSER Oceanography: Data Report Number 5, R/V Pelican Cruise, April 23-29, 1990, CTD and Hydrographic Data

      Toon, R.; Dagg, Michael J. (Louisiana Universities Marine ConsortiumChauvin, LA, 1990-08)
      This five year multi-institutional and multi-investigator program is entitled "Oceanographic Processes on Continental Shelves Influenced by Large Rivers." Funding began in January, 1987. The scientific goals of this program are a) investigations on a large spatial scale, from the Mississippi River delta to some far field (downplume) location, to examine biological responses to riverine inputs of dissolved nutrients, suspended sediments, and fresh water; b) investigations on small spatial scales, both horizontally and vertically, in a cross plume direction to examine the role of oceanographic fronts, convergences, and discontinuities in biological production; and c) investigations on small temporal scales, particularly to examine the biological responses to the passage of winter storms. This report summarizes the CTD and hydrographic data from the fifth LaSER oceanography cruise, for the Mississippi River plume region west of the delta.
    • LaSER Oceanography: Data Report Number 6, R/V Pelican Cruise, October 23-29, 1990, CTD and Hydrographic Data

      Toon, R.; Dagg, Michael J.; Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium (Louisiana Universities Marine ConsortiumChauvin, LA, 1991-02)
      This five year multi-institutional and multi-investigator program is entitled "Oceanographic Processes on Continental Shelves Influenced by Large Rivers." Funding began in January, 1987. The scientific goals of this program are a) investigations on a large spatial scale, from the Mississippi River delta to some far field (down-plume) location, to examine biological responses to riverine inputs of dissolved nutrients, suspended sediments, and fresh water; b) investigations on small spatial scales, both horizontally and vertically, in a cross plume direction to examine the role of oceanographic fronts, convergences, and discontinuities in biological production; and c) investigations on small temporal scales, particularly to examine the biological responses to the passage of winter storms. This report summarizes the CTD and hydrographic data from the sixth LaSER oceanography cruise, for the Mississippi River plume region west of the delta.
    • Nutrient Enhanced Coastal Ocean Productivity (NECOP) Data Report: CTD and Hydrographic Data, R/V Pelican Cruise, September 12-18, 1991

      Toon, R.; Dagg, Michael J. (Louisiana Universities Marine ConsortiumChauvin, LA, 1992-01)
      The Nutrient Enhanced Coastal Ocean Productivity (NECOP) Program is a component of NOAA's Coastal Ocean Program. The central hypothesis of this research is: Anthropogenic nutrient inputs have enhanced coastal ocean productivity with subsequent impacts on coastal ocean water quality, living resource yields, and the global marine carbon cycle. The initial study area for this program is the mississippi/Atchafalaya River Outflow and adjacent Louisiana shelf region. NECOP cruises I and II were in July/August 1990 and March 1991. The focus of this cruise, NECOP III, was on water column processes particularly phytoplankton, bacterial, and zooplankton processes as they relate to particulate flux. To accomplish these objectives we visited the plume region, the hypoxia region and a blue water region well offshore. In each region, the surface water was initially characterized by use of a flow-through mapping system aboard the vessel PELICAN, the MIDAS system. In addition an ADCP system was deployed with a different frequency being selected for each region. The high Frequency (1200 khz) transducer was used in the plume region, the mid-frequency (600 khz) transducer in the hypoxia region and the low frequency (300 khz) system in the offshore region. Within the plume and hypoxia regions, work was accomplished while following free floating sediment traps over 36-48 hour periods. In addition to routine hydrographic sampling (CTD, nutrients, chlorophyll, suspended particulate matter) experimental measurements of phytoplankton production, bacterial production, phosphorus uptake and turnover, zooplankton biomass and zooplankton feeding rates were made at appropriate intervals while tracking the sediment traps. This report summarizes the CTD and basic hydrographic measurements made during the cruise.
    • Nutrient Enhanced Coastal Ocean Productivity (NECOP). Data report: CTD and hydrographic data, R/V Pelican cruise, April 3-11, 1993

      Toon, R.; Dagg, M. (Louisiana Universities Marine ConsortiumChauvin, LA, 1993-08)
      The Nutrient Enhanced Coastal Ocean Productivity (NECOP) Program is a component of NOAA's Coastal Ocean Program. The central hypothesis of this research is: Anthropogenic nutrient inputs have enhanced coastal ocean productivity with subsequent impacts on coastal ocean water quality, living resource yields, and the global marine carbon cycle. The initial study area for this program is the Mississippi/Atchafalaya River Outflow and adjacent Louisiana shelf region.
    • Nutrient Enhanced Coastal Ocean Productivity (NECOP): Data Report: CTD and Hydrographic Data, R/V Pelican Cruise, May 5-17, 1992.

      Toon, R.; Dagg, Michael J.; Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium (Louisiana Universities Marine ConsortiumChauvin, LA, 1992-08)
      The Nutrient Enhanced Coastal Ocean Productivity (NECOP) Program is a component of NOAA's Coastal Ocean Program. The central hypothesis of this research is: anthropogenic nutrient inputs have enhanced coastal ocean productivity with subsequent impacts on coastal ocean water quality, living resource yields, and the global marine carbon cycle. The initial study area for this program is the Mississippi/Atchafalaya River Outflow and adjacent Louisiana shelf region. The focus of this cruise, P26-92, was on water column processes particularly phytoplankton, bacterial, and zooplankton processes as they relate to particulate flux. To accomplish these objectives we visited the plume region, the hypoxia region and a blue water region well offshore. In each region, the surface water was initially characterized by use of a flow-through mapping system aboard the vessel Pelican, the MIDAS system. In addition an ADCP system was deployed during portions of the cruise. Within the plume and hypoxia regions, work was accomplished while following free floating sediment traps over 48 hour periods. In addition to routine hydrographic sampling (CTD, nutrients, chlorophyll, suspended particulate matter) experimental measurements of phytoplankton production, bacterial production, zooplankton biomass and zooplankton feeding rates were made at appropriate intervals while tracking the sediment traps. This report summarizes the CTD and basic hydrographic measurements made during the cruise.
    • Temperature, salinity, chlorophyll, and nutrient concentrations in Terrebonne Bay, Louisiana from October 1982 to October 1983

      Dagg, Michael (Louisiana Universities Marine ConsortiumChauvin, LA, 1984)
      Coastal and inshore continental shelf waters of Louisiana are influenced by marsh run-off, the Mississippi River, and the open Gulf of Mexico. The interactions between freshwater run-off and oceanographic processes, coupled with meteorological conditions that vary widely over short periods as well as seasonally, result in a complex hydrography and therefore in a complex biological system. As the preliminary portion of a long-term program designed to analyze and understand these processes, a survey of basic hydrographic, chemical, and biological parameters was made at monthly intervals over a 1 year period from October 1982 to October 1983. Nine stations were occupied, transecting Terrebonne Bay and extending into the Gulf of Mexico. The purpose of this report is to present the data from this survey.
    • Young Scholars Cruise Report: Data Report: CTD and Hydrographic Data, R/V Pelican Cruise, July 1-4, 1993.

      Toon, R.; Shah, S.; Toler, E. (Louisiana Universities Marine ConsortiumChauvin, LA, 1993-07)
      Louisiana Young Scholars in Marine Science is a program supported by the National Science Foundation and the LUMCON Foundation, Inc. Ten students who have completed their junior year of high school and are entering their senior year were selected on scholastic merit for the program in the summer of 1993. As a part of this program, a 3-day research cruise was held aboard the R/V Pelican. The purpose of the cruise was two-fold: 1) to acquaint the students with some oceanographic sampling techniques and procedures; and 2) to characterize water column properties in different regions of the northern Gulf of Mexico. This report summarizes the results of this cruise.
    • Young Scholars Cruise Report: Data Report: CTD and Hydrographic Data, R/V Pelican Cruise, July 2-5, 1992.

      Toon, R.; Konikoff, M.; McNabb, B.; Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium (Louisiana Universities Marine ConsortiumChauvin, LA, 1992-07)
      Louisiana Young Scholars in Marine Science is a program supported by the National Science Foundation and the LUMCON Foundation, Inc. Ten students who have completed their junior year of high school and are entering their senior year were selected on scholastic merit for the program in summer of 1992. As a part of this program, a 3-day research cruise was held aboard the R/V Pelican. The purpose of the cruise was two-fold: 1) to acquaint the students with some oceanographic sampling techniques and procedures; and 2) to characterize water column properties in different regions of the northern Gulf of Mexico. This report summarizes the results of this cruise.