Recent Submissions

  • The Environment Agency/DEFRA Evidence and Measures Project: Practical Solutions - Moston Brook

    Hulme, P. (2013-04-23)
    This is the final presentation from the Moston Brook Evidence and Measures project which ran from September 2012 to March 2013. Moston Brook water body is part of the River Irwell Pilot Catchment and the objective of the project was to devise reliable measures (actions) which were based on existing evidence and that could be implemented in years 2 and 3 by the Environment Agency and its partner to help meet Water Framework Directive (WDF) requirements and community aspirations. The presentation summarises the main suspected causes of WDF failure, the evidence for this, the main causes for failure in the sub-catchments resulting from the evidence found, and identifies measures to carry out, which will address the WDF failures and improve the quality of the water. This presentation can be used to inform others on how to improve the water quality of Moston Brook, and also to support other similar initiatives.
  • River Bray fisheries survey 1978-80

    South West Water Authority (South West Water AuthorityUK, 1981)
    This is the River Bray fisheries survey 1978-80 report produced by South West Water Authority in 1981. This report aims to assess the possible effects of new abstraction conditions at Leahamford on the fish communities of the River Bray, surveys have been carried out in 1978, 197S and 1980. Field work was done in August and September each; year. Abstraction began in summer 1979. On the River Bray one site upstream and three downstream of Leahamford were chosen. One site on the River Mole was surveyed and is considered as a control site, being not directly affected by abstraction. The sketch map shows these sites in relation to Leahamford.
  • River Avon (including Glazebrook) fisheries survey 1978

    Clifton, D.K. (South West Water AuthorityUK, 1978)
    This is the River Avon (including Glazebrook) fisheries survey 1978 report produced by South West Water Authority in 1978. This report aims to determine the penetration of Salmon into the River Avon system and to a lesser degree estimate the population of resident salmonids and other indigenous species. Six sections were electro fished at accessible points as detailed below. All fish were identified and measured. Each section was fished through three times to take the majority of the resident species. Small specimens of salmonid fry, eels and lamprey were common in almost all River Avon sections with the exception of Shipley bridge and Avon Dam but due to the mesh size of the standard dip nets used, many slipped through making accurate number estimation impossible.
  • River Bovey (main Teign tributary) fisheries survey 1978

    Clifton, D.K. (South West Water AuthorityUK, 1978)
    This is the River Bovey (main Teign tributary) fisheries survey 1978 report produced by South West Water Authority in 1978. The aim of this report is to confirm or disprove the presence of alien coarse fish species thought present in the Bovey system. A chosen site was electro fished using D.C. methods wading upstream. All fish taken were measured and identified. Since it was not possible to distinguish between the young parr stages of migratory and non migratory trout, all parr taken have been included under the heading of Brown trout whereas in fact some of these parr may become migratory later in their life cycle.
  • Fisheries survey of the River Taw 1977

    South West Water Authority, Directorate of Fisheries and Recreation (South West Water AuthorityUK, 1978)
    This is the Fisheries survey of the River Taw 1977 report produced by South West Water Authority in 1978. The upper reaches of the River Taw were severely polluted in October 1975 and there was widespread fish mortality. A survey was carried out to assess the recovery of salmonid stocks in the affected areas. Salmon showed a rapid recovery and trout have also recovered well. Both species have been assisted by widespread stocking. Several other species were present. Salmonid and total fish biomass was high. Further stocking of salmon is not recommended and it is also suggested that stocking with trout should be discontinued.
  • Biological survey of the River Teign and tributaries, with reference to the effect of ball clay discharges

    Mold, M.D. (South West Water AuthorityUK, 1979)
    This is the Biological survey of the River Teign and tributaries, with reference to the effect of ball clay discharges report produced by South West Water Authority in 1979. A survey of the macroinvertebrate riffle fauna in the Ball Clay mining area of the Bovey Basin, following a period of low rainfall, indicated that the River Bovey and the River Teign between Chudleigh and Teign Bridge, Newton Abbot were of good quality. Further downstream, the R. Teign and the lower reaches of the Ugbrooke Stream were identified as being of doubtful quality with the discharge from ECC Broadway continuing to give cause for concern.
  • Fisheries survey of the River Otter 1978

    Hamilton, R.M. (South West Water AuthorityUK, 1979)
    This is the Fisheries survey of the River Otter report produced by South West Water Authority in 1979. This report focuses on the trout fishery in the River Otter and the possible effects of abstraction and/or pollution. A survey was carried out to describe the fish stocks. Trout and eels were the dominant species. The population structure of trout was peculiar, there being relatively few juveniles. Growth was good and there were numerous trout of take able size in the river at the end of the fishing season. Variations in the parameters measured are explained and nothing can be attributed to abstraction or pollution.
  • River Lemon (Teign catchment) fisheries survey

    Clifton, D.K. (South West Water AuthorityUK, 1979)
    This is the River Lemon (Teign catchment) fisheries survey report produced by South West Water Authority in 1979. This report aims to determine the penetration of Salmon into the River Lemon System and to a lesser degree estimate the population of resident salmonids. Five sections were surveyed being easily accessible and fishable by electro fishing methods.
  • Ashburn (Dart catchment) fisheries survey 1978

    South West Water Authority (UnpublishedUK, 1978)
    This is the Ashburn (Dart catchment) fisheries survey 1978 report produced by South West Water Authority in 1978. This report focuses on an exploratory survey to determine the population and distribution of all fish species and in particular salmonid species of the Ashburn stream. This survey is primarily intended for future reference on completion of the proposed Flood Alleviation Scheme of the Ashburn where it passes through the centre of Ashburton. Three sections were electro fished using D.C. Current Sections were chosen as easily accessible and through their relation in position to the intended scheme.
  • The River Torridge SAP Final Plan

    Environment Agency South West (Environment AgencyExeter, UK, 2000)
    This is the River Torridge Salmon Action Plan Final document produced by the Environment Agency in 2000. This final Salmon Action Plan (SAP) for the River Torridge catchment has been produced after consideration of feedback from external consultation. The SAP provides a list of the issues and actions which were agreed for a five-year programme to maintain and improve the River Torridge salmon stock. Some of these actions have already been delivered before finalising the SAP, but others have yet to be addressed. An attempt has been made to estimate the cost of the actions, identify possible sources of funding and the timescale under which they will be dealt with. The Torridge salmon stock has declined dramatically since the 1960s and is currently failing to meet the spawning target. The decline in the spring fish component has accounted largely for the overall decrease in stocks. The reasons for the decline are not fully understood, but the spring fish problem is recognised as a national issue. The rate of survival over the marine phase has reduced in recent years for both the grilse and multi-sea winter (MSW) components. This is undoubtedly a contributory factor, which may now constrain stocks to lower levels than have existed historically. Agricultural pollution is recognised as one of the main factors limiting freshwater production. This SAP aims to promote long term collaboration between the Agency and other interested parties in managing the River Torridge salmon stock and fisheries.
  • Rivers Taw and Torridge scale reading investigation. 8th annual report for the 1972 season

    Nott, F.J. (Devon River AuthorityUK, 1973)
    This is the Rivers Taw and Torridge scale reading investigation: the 8th annual report for the 1972 season produced by Devon River Authority in 1973. The object of the investigation is to examine by means of scale reading the biology of age classes of the salmon populations of the Rivers Taw and Torridge. The report is arranged in sections as previously and tables referred to in the report form an appendix. Scales were collected only from fish taken during the normal open season, which in 1972 was 1st April - 31st August. A weekly close time was in operation for the nets, a period of 60 hours from 6 p.m. on Friday evening to 6 a.m. on the following Monday. Thirty six licences for draft or seine nets were issued for the 1972 season and netsmen submitted samples of scales collected direct.
  • Fish communities in rivers to be affected by Roadford Reservoir

    Hamilton, R.M. (South West Water AuthorityUK, 1978)
    This is the Fish communities in rivers to be affected by Roadford Reservoir report produced by South West Water Authority in 1978. Surveys were carried, out on the Rivers Wolf, Thrushel, Lew and Lumburn, which are likely to be affected directly and indirectly by the construction and use of Roadford Reservoir. Of the upper reaches of three rivers to be affected directly by water releases, two were found to support abundant stocks of salmon and trout, and the third was found to contain abundant stocks of trout and eels. The River Thrushel will be affected indirectly and in this river salmon and trout stocks were present in slightly lower abundance than in others. Population estimates, densities, mean lengths and approximate biomass values were calculated. Other species were present in all rivers, usually in great abundance.
  • Biological survey: River Teign and tributaries with references to the discharge of ball clay wastes

    Mold, M.D. (South West Water AuthorityUK, 1973)
    This is the Biological survey of River Teign and tributaries with references to the discharge of ball clay wastes, document produced by South West Water Authority in 1973. This report focuses on on-site assessment of the benthic macro-invertebrates of the lower River Teign, River Bovey, Ugbrooke Stream and Blatchford Brook was undertaken on 19th and 22nd August 1977 to assess the effects of discharges from ball clay mining premises. Inspection of aquatic fauna in the field is of necessity, less extensive than laboratory identification of sorted samples, so that the resulting data underestimates the water quality. This is more pronounced in the Chandler Score than in the Trent Biotic Index which does not take account of species abundance. Chandler should thus be interpreted by the trends described rather than by absolute values calculated.
  • The River Taw SAP Consultation Document

    Environment Agency South West (Environment AgencyExeter, UK, 2000)
    This is the River Taw Salmon Action Plan Consultation document produced by the Environment Agency in 2000. The report pays attention on the external consultation of the River Taw Salmon Action Plan (SAP). This approach to salmon management within the England and Wales introduces the concept of river-specific Conservation Limits as a method of assessing the status of the salmon stock. The River Taw Salmon Action Plan (SAP) includes a description of the current status of the rod and net fisheries and historical trends. The Taw salmon stock has declined since the 1960s and is currently failing to meet the spawning target. The decline in the spring fish component has accounted largely for the overall decrease in stocks. The reasons for the decline are unclear, but the spring fish problem is recognised as a national issue. The rate of survival over the marine phase has reduced in recent years for both the grilse and MSW components. This is undoubtedly a contributory factor, which may now constrain stocks to lower levels than have existed historically.
  • The River Teign SAP Final Plan

    Environment Agency South West (Environment AgencyExeter, UK, 2003)
    This is the River Teign Salmon Action Plan Final document produced by the Environment Agency in 2003. This final Salmon Action Plan (SAP) for the River Teign catchment has been produced after consideration of feedback from external consultation. This final plan provides a list of the agreed issues and actions for the next five years to maintain and improve the River Teign salmon stock. An attempt has been made to cost these actions, identify possible sources of funding, partners and the timescale under which they will be dealt with. It indicates how the plan will be managed, i.e., implemented and reviewed, and, summarises progress of on-going actions. The low marine survival (likely to be below 10%) is possibly the main cause for the River Teign salmon stock non-compliance with its conservation limit. Actions protecting smolts and maximising spawning activity of returning adults are seen as priorities to contribute to offset the low marine survival. This SAP aims also to promote long term collaboration between the Agency and other interested parties in managing the River Teign salmon stock and fisheries.
  • The River Taw SAP Final Plan

    Environment Agency South West (Environment AgencyExeter, UK, 2000)
    This is the River Taw Salmon Action Plan Final document produced by the Environment Agency in 2000. This final Salmon Action Plan (SAP) for the River Taw catchment has been produced after consideration of feedback from external consultation. The SAP provides a list of the issues and actions which were agreed for a five-year programme to maintain and improve the River Taw salmon stock. Some of these actions have already been delivered before finalising the SAP, but others have yet to be addressed. An attempt has been made to estimate the cost of the actions, identify possible sources of funding and the timescale under which they will be dealt with. The Taw salmon stock is currently failing to meet its spawning target. However, there was a period of compliance in the 1990s following a decade of failure through the 1980s. The freshwater environment of the Taw has improved in recent years. The actions presented in this SAP are perceived as those that are required to address, as far as possible, the important issues and factors currently limiting the salmon stock on the river. This SAP aims to promote long term collaboration between the Agency and other interested parties in managing the River Taw salmon stock and fisheries.
  • The River Teign SAP Consultation Document

    Environment Agency South West (Environment AgencyExeter, UK, 2003)
    This is the River Teign Salmon Action Plan Consultation document produced by the Environment Agency in 2003. The report pays attention on the external consultation of the River Teign Salmon Action Plan (SAP). This approach to salmon management within the England and Wales introduces the concept of river-specific Conservation Limits as a method of assessing the status of the salmon stock. The River Teign Salmon Action Plan follows the format of those completed for the Rivers Torridge, Taw and Dart. It is the fourth of eight action plans that will be produced for salmon rivers within the Devon Area Fisheries, Recreation and Biodiversity Team. The River Teign SAP contains a description of the river catchment and highlights particular features that are relevant to the salmon population and the associated fishery. The Teign salmon stock is currently failing to meet its conservation limit. This failure is largely attributed to the reduction in the survival rate during the marine phase of the salmon life cycle. This is likely to constrain stocks to lower levels than have existed historically. Still further catch controls may contribute to a reduction in exploitation rates and allow stocks to recover to meet their conservation limit. Other important actions include the continuation of habitat improvement works which aim to maximise spawning habitat utilisation, spawning success, and juvenile survival and production.
  • The River Exe SAP Consultation Document

    Environment Agency South West (Environment AgencyExeter, UK, 2003)
    This is the River Exe Salmon Action Plan Consultation document produced by the Environment Agency in 2003. The report pays attention on the external consultation of the River Exe Salmon Action Plan (SAP). This strategy represents an entirely new approach to salmon management within the UK and introduces the concept of river-specific salmon spawning targets as a salmon management tool. The River Exe SAP follows the format of those completed for the Rivers Teign, Torridge, Taw and Dart. It is the fifth of eight action plans that will be produced for salmon rivers within Devon Area. The River Exe SAP contains a description of the river catchment and highlights particular features that are relevant to the salmon population and the associated fishery. The Exe salmon stock is judged to be meeting its Conservation Limit. However, this assessment is uncertain as it is based on an estimate of rod exploitation rate, which in itself is also uncertain. At present there is no means of accurately assessing the River Exe salmon run. In common with many other rivers, estimation of stock using catch statistics and rod exploitation rate is the model used, when direct assessment is not possible. The installation of a fish counter on the lower river, or the use of other direct counting methods, would help to provide a direct assessment of the annual run of salmon into the river. This would improve our ability to estimate the spawning escapement and hence assess compliance with the Conservation Limit.
  • The River Lyn SAP Consultation Document

    Environment Agency South West (Environment AgencyExeter, UK, 2003)
    This is the River Lyn Salmon Action Plan Consultation document produced by the Environment Agency in 2003. The report pays attention on the external consultation of the River Lyn Salmon Action Plan (SAP). This approach to salmon management within the England and Wales introduces the concept of river-specific Conservation Limits as a method of assessing the status of the salmon stock. The River Lyn Salmon Action Plan follows the format of those completed for the Rivers Exe, Axe, Avon & Erme, Teign, Torridge, Taw and Dart. It is the last of eight action plans that have been produced for salmon rivers within Devon Area. The River Lyn Salmon Action Plan contains a description of the river catchment and highlights particular features that are relevant to the salmon population and the associated fishery. The Lyn salmon stock is judged to be meeting its Conservation Limit. However, this assessment is uncertain as it is based on an estimate of rod exploitation rate, which in itself is also uncertain.
  • The River Exe SAP Final Plan

    Environment Agency South West (Environment AgencyExeter, UK, 2003)
    This is the River Exe Salmon Action Plan Final document produced by the Environment Agency in 2003. This final Salmon Action Plan (SAP) for the River Exe catchment has been produced after consideration of feedback from external consultation. The actions presented within this Salmon Action Plan clarify the important issues and factors currently limiting the salmon stock on the river. An attempt has been made to cost these actions, identify possible sources of funding and to provide a timescale for action. This SAP aims also to promote long term collaboration between the Agency and other interested parties in managing the River Exe salmon stock and fisheries. The River Exe salmon population is currently judged to be passing its Conservation Limit. However, its apparent declining trend in egg deposition in the recent years and the high uncertainty in its stock assessment suggest the following actions as priorities: actions promoting good land management, maximising salmon natural spawning activity and protecting smolts throughout the Exe catchment. Also, the lack of information on salmon stocks and its habitat quality and availability is recognised as the main factor limiting the better management of salmon fisheries. The actions presented in this document are perceived as those required to address the important issues and factors limiting the salmon stock.

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