• 1994 annual report on fisheries in the North west incorporating the annual summary of fishery statistics.

      National Rivers Authority North West Region (Environment Agency North WestWarrington, UK, 1995)
      This report provides national and regional developments, statistics on fisheries finance, including income and expenditure, salmon and sea trout catches, including rod and line, commercial catches, and angler log book returns, monitoring and special projects, including salmon microtagging, salmon egg survival in Swanside Beck, and fish stock assessments, one with hydroacoustics, and one of surveys of different areas in Cumbria. The appendix includes a summary of fish statistics for 1994.
    • 1995 annual report on fisheries in the North west incorporating the annual summary of fishery statistics.

      Environment Agency North West Region (Environment Agency North WestWarrington, UK, 1996)
      This fisheries report summarises national and regional developments focussing on the North West region of the Environment Agency. The North West region covers around 14,000 square km, from Cheshire in the south to its northern border with Scotland. The report provides statistics on fisheries finance, including income and expenditure, salmon and sea trout catches, including rod and line and net catches, and special projects, including fish stock assessments, and surveys. The appendix includes a summary of fish statistics for 1995.
    • 1998 annual report on fisheries in the North west incorporating the annual summary of fishery statistics.

      Environment Agency North West Region (Environment Agency North WestWarrington, UK, 1999)
      This fisheries report summarises national and regional developments focussing on the North West region of the Environment Agency. The North West region covers around 14,000 square km, from Cheshire in the south to its northern border with Scotland. This report provides national and regional developments,and special projects, including fish stocking assessments, radiotracking, and Cumbria surveys. Salmon and sea trout catches, including rod and line and net catches appear in the appendix.
    • 1999 annual report on fisheries in the North west incorporating the annual summary of fishery statistics

      Environment Agency North West Region (Environment Agency North WestWarrington, UK, 2000)
      This fisheries report summarises national and regional developments focussing on the North West region of the Environment Agency. The North West region covers around 14,000 square km, from Cheshire in the south to its northern border with Scotland. The report provides statistics on fisheries finance, including salmon and sea trout catches, including rod and line and net catches, and special projects, including fish stock assessments, radiotracking, and various surveys. The appendix includes a summary of fish statistics for 1999.
    • 2000 annual report on fisheries in the North West

      Environment Agency North West Region (Environment Agency North WestWarrington, UK, 2001)
      This fisheries report summarises developments of the year 2000 in the North West Region of the Environment Agency. The North West region covers around 14,000 square km, from Cheshire in the south to its northern border with Scotland. The report provides statistics on fisheries finance, including salmon and sea trout catches, including rod and line and net catches, and special projects, including fish stock assessments, radiotracking, and various surveys. The appendix includes a summary of fish statistics for 2000.
    • 2001 annual report on fisheries in the North West

      Environment Agency North West Region (Environment Agency North West RegionWarrington, UK, 2002)
      This is the 2001 annual report on fisheries in the North West produced by the Environment Agency North West in 2002. This report has four main aims: to inform the Agency’s customers of developments within the Agency, to inform the Agency’s customers of the work carried out by the Agency, to publish information on the performance of fisheries and the Fisheries Department, and to be a source of future reference. The fisheries service is funded in the main by a mixture of rod licence income and government grant-in-aid. The latter has declined substantially since the mid 1990’s and we are increasingly reliant on licence income to fund fisheries work. The environment agency had managed to use some of this money to fund their Urban Fisheries Development Programme, (UFDP). This is aimed at delivering new or improved fisheries in areas where demand for fishing is high, but where available fisheries are few in number or of poor quality. This work is dependent on good co-operation with local angling clubs, councils and other interests.
    • 20lb Pike from River Lune transferred by two men to Roan Head

      Environment Agency North West
      Two men with a 20 lb. pike from Lune being transferred to Roan Head, North West England, UK. This photo is part of a Photo Album that includes pictures from 1935 to 1954.
    • A coarse fish close season on canals. Paper in evidence to the review of fisheries policy and legislation. Paper number: EA-12

      Environment Agency (Environment Agency, 1998)
      This paper gives the results of the Environment Agency's research into the canal close season to the Salmon and Freshwater Fisheries Review Group. It presents the findings of the research, explains why the research was undertaken and how it relates to the Agency's duties.The background for this report includes that angling representative bodies have long argued that the existing situation in which somecanals have a close season and others do not, is unsatisfactory.
    • A comparative survey of the fish populations of 10 West-Midlands meres of SSSI status

      Holland, R.K.; Goldspink, C.R. (Metropolitan UniversityManchester, UK, 1995)
      This is a comparative survey of the Fish Populations of 10 West-Midlands Mere of Site of Special Scientific Interest Status. The meres of the Shropshire-Cheshire plain (West Midlands) comprise over 60 water bodies. Water quality in the meres ranges from naturally eutrophic to nutrient limited and some of them have received Site of Special Scientific Interest status (SSSIs). This survey was commissioned in order to obtain quantitative information on the fish fauna of selected SSSIs and evaluate the likely impact of fish on other species within the community. The current survey was concerned with 10 of the West Midlands’ meres, a cross section of sites was selected. Sites were widely distributed from Marton Pool in the south-western part of Shropshire to Tabley moat in Chesire. Meres varied in size, depth and nutrient status. All were to be sampled using the methods outlined. The report is divided into different sections for clarity and ease of reference. The materials and methods section provides an outline of the location and status of each mere and information on known fish species present. The results were considered individually and comparatively, relative abundance of fish, species present, their diet, sex, age, parasite burdens and growth. Inter-site comparisons were made using information derived from echo-soundings, growth rate, diet, and species abundance for each site. The final section will be in the form of a general discussion, comparative information from longer term studies, conclusions and recommendations.
    • A field guide for Agency staff operating the SIMRAD EY500 portable scientific echosounder. 2nd draft 3rd August 1999

      Hillary, J.; Lyons, J.; Frear, P. (Environment Agency, 1999)
      This manual has been produced by members of the national acoustics group (NAG) and represents the first in a series of outputs designed to promote co-ordination and consistencyin Agency hydroacoustic surveys. It is designed as a field guide for Agency staff operating the SIMRAD EY500 portable scientific echosounder. It should be simplistic enough for the newcomer to EY500 to be able to set up and run a mobile hydroacoustic survey with some knowledge of the supporting theory. It should act as guidance for standardisation of survey procedures providing a concise list of settings and recommendations that can be used as a quick reference guide in the field. This manual condenses 5 years of practical experience of surveying fish populations using Simrad hardware and software for surveying large rivers and still waters throughout England and Wales. This document should be used as a companion to the manufacturers instruction manual and not act as a substitute for it.
    • A guide to the interpretation of sea trout scales

      Elliott, J.M.; Chambers, S. (National Rivers AuthorityBristol, UK, 1996)
      The overall purpose of this guide is to provide a manualfor the collection and interpretation of sea trout scales. Abrief introduction considers the advantages anddisadvantages of using scales to determine age and growth.To ensure that scales are interpreted in a consistentmanner, all major terms are defined and a standard systemfor age notation is proposed. The methodology for thecollection, mounting and interpretation of scales isdescribed in detail, and this is followed by a section on the back-calculation of lengths at different ages. Each topic is discussed critically. The final part of this guide is an atlas illustrating scales from a wide range of sea trout and including not only excellent "type-scales" but also difficult and impossible scales.
    • A hydraulic investigation of the River Lune.

      Environment Agency North West (Environment Agency North WestUK, 1972)
      Historic film on the River Lune, North England, UK. It shows the River Lune near its estuary at Lancaster. The film was made in the summer of 1972 over several weeks and is 14:25 minutes long. It combines aerial shots of the River, scientific and hydraulic work by the University of Salford which worked on a new weir of the Lune (Skerton Weir). Audio commentary explains the work. The film was produced by Cinephoto House, Manchester, on behalf of the predecessor orgenaisation of the Environment Agency, UK. The intended audience of the film is unknown.
    • A hydrogeological assessment of Wybunbury Moss

      Ingram, J.A.; Seymour, K.J. (Environment AgencyUK, 2003)
      This is a technical report of a hydrogeological assessment by the Environment Agency, an assessment to inform the Stage 3 review of Consents under the Habitats Directive for Wybunbury Moss, a National Nature Reserve and Special Area of Conservation in Cheshire. In the Stage 2 Review of Consents, one groundwater licence could not be clearly assessed as having no significant impact and so was taken forward to Stage 3. Further work has been carried out to refine the understanding of groundwater flow and the extent of the actual groundwater catchment of Wybunbury Moss, including three drilled boreholes, the monitoring of groundwater levels in the boreholes by data-loggers for more than 18 months and the sampling and analysis of the groundwater from the boreholes. Results of this further work are shown in Appendixes. From this work, a geological cross-section and Conceptual Model has been produced, and a map showing the revised understanding of the groundwater catchment of Wybunbury Moss. It also includes in Appendix I, the Stage 2 Review of Consents previously made.
    • A hydrological assessment of the Delamere Sandsheets and environs

      Water Management Consultants (Environment AgencyWarrington, UK, 2003)
      This is the technical report of a hydrogeological assessment of the Delamere sandsheet and environments by the Environment Agency.The overall objective of the study is to carry out Stage 3-appropriate assessment, under the EU Habitats Directive (92/43/EEC), of the influence of activities permitted by the Agency relating to groundwater on candidate Special Areas of Conservation (cSAC). The geology of Delamere area, based on published and collected information is described in Section2. Groundwater flow and water quality are described in Section 3, including sections on groundwater levels, aquifer properties, groundwater discharge and hydrogeochemisty. A water balance for the sandsheet for the period 2001-2002 is presented in Section 4, and the hydrogeological conceptual model of the area is described in Section 5. The assessment of the possible impacts of Agency-permitted groundwater abstractions on Oakmere and Abbots Moss is presented in Section 6 whilst conclusions and recommendations are given in Section 7.
    • A preliminary investigation of Elastomer Visible Implant (EVI)tag retention rates and the effect of tagging on the growth and survival of barbel (Barbus barbus L.).

      Morgan, C.E.; Farooqi, M.A. (National River Authority North WestWarrington, UK, 1995)
      The Elastomer Visible Implant system (EVI) is arelatively new technique for batch marking fish. The aimof this study was to assess retention rates and thepossible effects of tagging on the growth and mortalityof barbel, Barbus barbus, (81-197mm, fork length) overapproximately 2 months using a syringe injection system.
    • A report on the population structure of adult salmon and sea trout in the River Lune using scale samples - with reference to historical data.

      Jones, L.A.; McCubbing , D.J.F. (National Rivers AuthorityLevens, UK, 1993-12)
      During 1993, a comprehensive data set of scale readings, length and weight measurements was established for migratory salmonids on the River Lune. This information was collected using three methods of fish capture: 1. The Lune estuary commercial nets. 2. River Lune Forge weir fish trap. 3. River Lune rod catch scale returns. Additional information was contributed by the Kent, Leven and Duddon rod and commercial fisheries. The data shows that the salmon stock in 1993 was dominated by two year old smolts. This varies from year to year.The sea trout population displays a normal population curve in terms of numbers of fish in each age and weight class. The growth rate of salmon and sea trout is very similar even though salmon have the benefit of high sea feeding.
    • A report on the strategic fisheries stock assessment survey of the River Winster 1995 together with a coarse fish survey in 1994 and reference to the 1995 drought

      National Rivers Authority (Environment Agency North WestUK, 1996)
      This is the report on the strategic fisheries stock assessment survey of the River Winster 1995 together with a coarse fish survey in 1994 and reference to the 1995 drought, produced by the Environment Agency North West in 1996. Salmonid production within the Winster catchment was dominated by trout although good densities of salmon juveniles were found on some main river sites. Despite suffering drought conditions for much of 1995, only salmon fry production appeared to have been affected. Coarse fish populations once found in the lower reaches of the Winster appear to have declined to very low levels with no fish sampled. This may be partly due to broken tidal gates allowing saline intrusion. It seems that the lower river was suited to the development of a recreational coarse fishery, now that the gates have been repaired. This report completes the strategic stock assessment surveys planned for the period 1992-1995. It represents the last major catchment that was surveyed to determine the current status of fisheries in the South and South West Cumbria areas.
    • A report on the strategic stock assessment survey of the Colton Beck catchment 1994 with particular reference to salmonids

      McCubbing , D.J.F.; Locke, V. (North West WaterCarlisle, UK, 1994)
      This is the report on the strategic stock assessment survey of the Colton Beck catchment in 1994 with particular reference to salmonids in Colton Beck, River Ea, River Gilpin and Rusland Pool. This report forms one part of the third year of a triennial survey programme for the South West Cumbria and South Cumbria catchments. It was produced by the National Rivers Authority in 1994. Colton Beck had excellent densities of sea trout (Salmo trutta) and a small population of salmon (Salmo salar) in its lowest reaches. The total productivity was very good throughout the catchment. Stocking of sea trout fry in 1993 has enhanced the population with survivors through to parr probably adding to the scoring of double class A at two sites in the survey in 1994. Stocking was not undertaken in 1994, but the population appears to be maintaining itself at a very high level.
    • A study of salmonid egg and fry survival in the River Taff catchment

      Brown, H.; Charrett, D.J.; Strange, C.D.; Aprahamian , M.W.; Jones, G.O. (Welsh Water, 1988-01)
      This report looks at previous findings that egg survival was related to the percentage of fine solids in the spawning gravels of the River Taff. Green salmonid eggs were planted out at 8 sites in the Taff catchment; and eyed salmonid eggs were planted out at 27 sites. Gravel cores were taken at 18 of these sites and an analysis of their composition was carried out, particular attention being given to the pecentage of particles less than 1mm. As well as its method, the report includes its own findings and recommendations, which includes other factors influencing egg survival such as the need for water quality improvements.
    • A summary report on juvenile salmonid populations of the River Lune catchment, 1981 to 1991

      McCubbing , D.J.F.; Farooqi, M.A.; Aprahamian , M.W. (National Rivers Authority North West RegionLevens, UK, 1993-06)
      This report summarises the fisheries electrofishing survey work undertaken on the River Lune, England, in the period 1981-85 and 1991. As part of a long term monitoring programme by the National Rivers Authority, juvenile surveys, with the emphasis on salmonids, have been carried out on the River Lune on a number of occasions since 1981. The latest survey in 1991 now gives the opportunity to assess what, if any, changes have occurred in the juvenile populations across the last 11 years and how future fisheries management may impact on the River Lune as a fishery. The areas of trout and salmon, fry and parr production will be considered in detail, as will adult trout populations. Water quality issues will be mentioned briefly as will habitat issues, where they are deemed to be important in affecting fish densities.