• Amnesic Shellfish Poisoning (ASP)

      Ravn, H. (UNESCOParis, 1995)
      In this manual a review is provided of the chemical and toxicological aspects of Amnesic Shellfish Poisoning (ASP). The document contains information on chemical structure, chemical data, where to obtain standards and reference materials, the origin and occurrence, chemical analysis, mouse bioassay, epidemiology, mechanisms of action, symptoms and therapeutics. The practical use of this document has been highlighted in agreement with the Members of the Task Team on Aquatic Biotoxins. This document is prepared by Dr. H. Ravn, IOC together with Prof. T. Yasumoto, Tohoku University, Japan, Chairman of the Task Team on Aquatic Biotoxins. Dr. J. Ramsdell, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Charleston Laboratory, USA has supplied parts of the toxicological information, and the document has been kindly reviewed by Dr. M.A. Quilliam, National Research Council Canada, Institute for Marine Biosciences, Canada.
    • Black Sea data management guide

      IOC for UNESCO (UNESCOParis, 2002)
      The material on the "Black Sea Data Management Guide" are prepared in accordance with the working plans of the IOC Committee on International Data and Information Exchange (IODE) and its regional component in the Black Sea region to assist specialists of the Black Sea countries in the field of Data Management. The Guide includes the following items: • national oceanographic data centres, designated national agencies, other marine centres and institutions of the Black Sea region countries dealing with problems of oceanographic data; • current international and national projects and programs of the Black Sea region countries; • preliminary catalogue marine observation in the Black Sea; • bibliography of publications of the marine centres and institute of the Black Sea region on problems of the Black Sea data and information published mainly during the past 5 years; • other information related to oceanographic data and information on the Black Sea. The compiler of the Guide is Alexander M. Suvorov, Deputy Director of the Marine Hydrophisical Institute of the Ukrainian National Academy of Sciences, national and regional (the Black Sea region) co-ordinator of the IOC IODE Committee, the editor-in-chief is Valery N. Eremeev, Director General of the Oceanological Centre of the Ukrainian National Academy of Sciences, the Chairman of the IOC UNESCO Black Sea Regional Committee, the Chairman of the Steering Committee of the Black Sea Global Observing Oceanographic System (BSGOOS).
    • Black Sea Data Management Guide

      IOC; UNESCO (2002)
      The material on the "Black Sea Data Management Guide" are prepared in accordance with the working plans of the IOC Committee on International Data and Information Exchange (IODE) and its regional component in the Black Sea region to assist specialists of the Black Sea countries in the field of Data Management. The Guide includes the following items: national oceanographic data centres, designated national agencies, other marine centres and institutions of the Black Sea region countries dealing with problems of oceanographic data; current international and national projects and programs of the Black Sea region countries; preliminary catalogue marine observation in the Black Sea; bibliography of publications of the marine centres and institute of the Black Sea region on problems of the Black Sea data and information published mainly during the past 5 years; other information related to oceanographic data and information on the Black Sea.
    • Environmental Design and Analysis in Marine Environmental Sampling

      Underwood, A.J. (UNESCO, 1996)
      The IOC-IMO-UNEP/GIPME Groups of Experts on Effects of Pollution (GEEP) has been working for a number of years on promoting new ways of understanding how pollutants affect marine biological systems. A major initial focus of GEEP was on calibration workshops where different methods were tested against one another. The Oslo (1986), Bermuda (1988) and Bremerhaven (1992) workshop publications are widely regarded as benchmarks demonstrating that biological effects methods are reliable tools for measurement of the effects of pollutants discharged to the marine environment. IOC through GEEP, in cooperation with UNEP, has published a series of manuals based on the successful techniques and these are listed at the back of this volume. Monitoring programmes for chemical contamination and for biological effects of these contaminants are used globally. Yet often the sampling design of such programmes has received little attention. Monitoring programmes are often conducted in order to be able to tell politicians and managers whether or not the quality of a given sea area is improving or getting worse. More often than not the answer, frequently after many years of measurement, is that the trends are difficult to detect. It is no exaggeration to say that countless millions of dollars are wasted in poor sampling design where there is no possibility of getting the answers to the questions posed by the managers and politicians. Sampling design is a key but neglected aspect of chemical and biological effects monitoring. In this manual, GEEP Vice Chairman, Professor A.J. Underwood of the University of Sydney gives a clear and important account of the key elements of good sampling design, It is our hope that this manual will help change the way that managers and scientists consider their monitoring programmes and that there will be a radical change in sampling design as a consequence.
    • Estrategia de desarrollo de capacidades de la COI 2015-2021.

      Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commision (UnescoParis, France, 2016)
      El desarrollo de capacidades es uno de los pilares de la misión de la COI ya que permite a todos los Estados Miembros participar en la investigación y los servicios oceánicos y beneficiarse de esos elementos fundamentales para el desarrollo sostenible y el bienestar humano en el planeta. En la visión de esta Estrategia se considera el desarrollo de capacidades como el principal catalizador que permitirá a la COI alcanzar sus cuatro objetivos de alto nivel definidos en la Estrategia a Plazo Medio de la COI (2014-2021).
    • Global temperature and salinity profile programme (GTSPP)- Data user's manual, first edition

      IOC for UNESCO (UNESCOParis, 2011)
      The Global Temperature and Salinity Profile Programme (GTSPP) is a joint Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC) and World Meteorological Organization (WMO) programme to develop and maintain a global ocean Temperature-Salinity resource with data that are both up-to-date and of the highest quality[2]. The four primary objectives of GTSPP are: a) Provide a timely and complete data and information base of ocean temperature and salinity profile data, b) Implement data flow monitoring system for improving the capture and timeliness of real-time and delayed-mode data, c) Improve and implement agreed and uniform quality control and duplicates management systems, and d) Facilitate the development and provision of a wide variety of useful data analyses, data and information products, and data sets. The international oceanographic community‟s interest in creating a timely global ocean temperature and salinity dataset of known quality in support of the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) dates back to the 1981 “International Oceanographic Data and Information Exchange” (IODE) meeting in Hamburg, Federal Republic of Germany. The community's interest led to preliminary discussions by the Australian Oceanographic Data Center (AODC), the Marine Environmental Data Service (MEDS), now the Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM), of Canada and the U.S. National Oceanographic Data Center (NODC) during the second Joint IOC–WMO Meeting of Experts on IGOSS1-IODE Data Flow in Ottawa, Canada in January 1988. Development of the GTSPP (then called the Global Temperature-Salinity Pilot Project) began in 1989. The short-term goal was to respond to the needs of the Tropical Ocean and Global Atmosphere (TOGA) Experiment and the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE) for temperature and salinity data. The longer-term goal was to develop and implement an end-to-end data management system for temperature and salinity data and other associated types of profiles, which could serve as a model for future oceanographic data management systems. GTSPP began operation in November 1990. The first version of the GTSPP Project Plan was published in the same year. Since that time, there have been many developments and some changes in direction including a decision by IOC and WMO to end the pilot phase and implement GTSPP as a permanent programme in 1996. Figure 1 is a sketch diagramme of the GTSPP management structure. GTSPP reports to the IODE Programme of IOC and the Joint Commission for Oceanography and Marine Meteorology (JCOMM), a body sponsored by WMO and IOC.
    • Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Programme (GTSPP) - Overview and Future

      Wilson, J.R. (UNESCO, 1998)
      This document is directed to the scientific research community and users of operational ocean data. It is also intended to provide an example and be a source of information to programmes such as the Global Ocean Observing System (GOOS) for developing and implementing end-to-end data management systems. The document is also directed towards Member States of IOC. It discusses how Member States can make contributions and how they can benefit from the GTSPP.
    • Guide for establishing a National Oceanographic Data Centre

      IOC/UNESCO (1997)
      This guide has been prepared to assist Member States of Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC) in establishing and operating a national oceanographic data centre (NODC). Since the early 1960s, approximately 55 Member States of IOC have established oceanographic data centres or designated a national agency as responsible for international oceanographic data and information exchange. These data centres and designated national agencies (DNAs) support both national and international clients with oceanographic data and information services.
    • Guide for establishing a National Oceanographic Data Centre

      IOC (UNESCO, 2008)
      This Document is the second revision of the IOC Manuals and Guides No.5. The first edition was published in 1975 and the first revision in 1997. This document deals mainly with oceanographic data management but, as data and information management are increasingly complementary, some attention is also given to marine information management. This Guide is intended as a tool for policy makers at the national level to assist them with the decision-making related to the establishment of national facilities for the management of oceanographic data (and information). It is also intended to be a reference document for national organizations involved in, or planning to be involved in, oceanographic data and information management.