Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorSantoro, Francesca
dc.contributor.authorSantin, Selvaggia
dc.contributor.authorScowcroft, Gail
dc.contributor.authorFauville, Géraldine
dc.contributor.authorTuddenham, Peter
dc.date.accessioned2021-07-16T14:30:08Z
dc.date.available2021-07-16T14:30:08Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.isbn978-92-3-100249-6
dc.identifier.otherIOC/2017/MG/80rev.
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1834/41361
dc.description.abstractRecognizing the lack of ocean-related subjects in formal education, a group of ocean scientists and education professionals in the US in 2002 initiated a collaborative and bottom-up process to develop a comprehensive framework to encourage the inclusion of ocean sciences into national and state standards, and for more teaching about the ocean in K-12 classrooms. This was the start of the ocean literacy movement that since then it has spread around the world through the development of marine science educators associations in Canada, Australia, Europe and Asia. Ocean literacy programs and projects, until now, have been mainly focusing on developing resources, lesson plans and activities targeting Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) education. Currently, and in particular after the adoption of the Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 14, we have assisted to a shift in the focus towards the inclusion of approaches closer to those developed under the UNESCO framework of Education for Sustainable Development (ESD). ESD aims to improve access to quality education on sustainable development at all levels and in all social contexts, to transform society by reorienting education and help people develop knowledge, skills, values and behaviors needed for sustainable development. Individuals are encouraged to be responsible actors who resolve challenges, respect cultural diversity and contribute to creating a more sustainable world. This publication is made of two parts. The first part presents the history of ocean literacy, and describes its framework made of 7 essential principles, and connects them to international ocean science programs that contributes to enhancing ocean knowledge and observations. Moreover, marine scientists and educators were interviewed to share their professional experiences on ocean literacy as well as their views on its future. The last chapter of part 1 describes the existing challenges to marine education, as well as the path for the development of successful ocean literacy activities in the context of the 2030 Agenda. One of the most important factors identified is related to the creation of multi-sector partnerships among the education, government, and private sector that have jointly built ocean literacy programs for all formal educational levels from the primary school to the university level as well as for non-formal learners. Worldwide examples of such programs are presented. The second part, after introducing the methodological approach based on the multi-perspective framework for ESD developed by UNESCO, presents 14 activities that could provide tested examples and support for the implementation of marine education initiatives. The aim is not to provide a one size-fits-all ready to use collection, but rather to offer support and examples of what could be then adapted for different geographical and cultural contexts. The resources are designed to be relevant for all learners of all ages worldwide and to find their application in many learning settings, while in their concrete implementation they will, naturally, have to be adapted to the national or local context.
dc.description.sponsorshipWe extend our warmest thanks to the Government of Sweden and to the Voluntary Commitment partners who contributed resources for developing the kit as part of their support for IOC-UNESCO.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherIOC/UNESCO & UNESCO Venice Officeen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesIOC Manuals & Guides; 80rev
dc.relation.urihttps://unesdoc.unesco.org/ark:/48223/pf0000260721en_US
dc.rightsAttribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/*
dc.subject.otherBlue Planeten_US
dc.subject.otherSustainabilityen_US
dc.titleOcean Literacy for All: a toolkit.en_US
dc.typeReporten_US
dc.contributor.corpauthorInternational Oceanographic Commission
dc.description.notesrevision of an originally published in 2017.en_US
dc.description.statusPublisheden_US
dc.format.pages136pp.en_US
dc.publisher.placeParis, Franceen_US
dc.subject.asfaASFA_2015::E::Educationen_US
refterms.dateFOA2021-07-16T14:30:09Z
html.description.abstractRecognizing the lack of ocean-related subjects in formal education, a group of ocean scientists and education professionals in the US in 2002 initiated a collaborative and bottom-up process to develop a comprehensive framework to encourage the inclusion of ocean sciences into national and state standards, and for more teaching about the ocean in K-12 classrooms. This was the start of the ocean literacy movement that since then it has spread around the world through the development of marine science educators associations in Canada, Australia, Europe and Asia. Ocean literacy programs and projects, until now, have been mainly focusing on developing resources, lesson plans and activities targeting Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) education. Currently, and in particular after the adoption of the Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 14, we have assisted to a shift in the focus towards the inclusion of approaches closer to those developed under the UNESCO framework of Education for Sustainable Development (ESD). ESD aims to improve access to quality education on sustainable development at all levels and in all social contexts, to transform society by reorienting education and help people develop knowledge, skills, values and behaviors needed for sustainable development. Individuals are encouraged to be responsible actors who resolve challenges, respect cultural diversity and contribute to creating a more sustainable world. This publication is made of two parts. The first part presents the history of ocean literacy, and describes its framework made of 7 essential principles, and connects them to international ocean science programs that contributes to enhancing ocean knowledge and observations. Moreover, marine scientists and educators were interviewed to share their professional experiences on ocean literacy as well as their views on its future. The last chapter of part 1 describes the existing challenges to marine education, as well as the path for the development of successful ocean literacy activities in the context of the 2030 Agenda. One of the most important factors identified is related to the creation of multi-sector partnerships among the education, government, and private sector that have jointly built ocean literacy programs for all formal educational levels from the primary school to the university level as well as for non-formal learners. Worldwide examples of such programs are presented. The second part, after introducing the methodological approach based on the multi-perspective framework for ESD developed by UNESCO, presents 14 activities that could provide tested examples and support for the implementation of marine education initiatives. The aim is not to provide a one size-fits-all ready to use collection, but rather to offer support and examples of what could be then adapted for different geographical and cultural contexts. The resources are designed to be relevant for all learners of all ages worldwide and to find their application in many learning settings, while in their concrete implementation they will, naturally, have to be adapted to the national or local context.en_US
dc.description.refereedRefereeden_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
260721eng_Ocean_LIteracy_EN.pdf
Size:
12.85Mb
Format:
PDF
Description:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International