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dc.contributor.authorMcCulloch, S.
dc.contributor.authorMeynecke, J.-O.
dc.contributor.authorFranklin, T.
dc.contributor.authorFranklin, W.
dc.contributor.authorChauvenet, A. L. M.
dc.date.accessioned2023-09-23T17:27:11Z
dc.date.available2023-09-23T17:27:11Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1071/MF21065
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1834/42785
dc.description.abstractHumpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) require a suite of essential habitats during their long migration. Therefore, the identification of critical habitats is important for continuation of their successful recovery. In this study we investigated the behaviours and habitat usage exhibited by humpback whales in two known aggregation sites on the east coast of Australia. Using a combined 5400 humpback whale records collected from Hervey Bay between 1999 and 2009 and from the Gold Coast Bay between 2011 and 2018, we analysed different types of behavioural categories. We found that humpback whales in Hervey Bay primarily exhibited surface travel and non-aggressive social behaviour, whereas both sites appeared to be similarly important for resting. Our results suggest that the Gold Coast Bay provides habitat for a wide range of critical humpback whale activities, in particular for resting mother–calf pairs, mature males seeking copulation and socialising immature whales. Hervey Bay had a higher number of mother–calf pair sightings, confirming the area as an important resting site. This study demonstrates that the two regions are critical habitats for humpback whales during their annual migration, but for different essential activities, and should be considered as a whale protection area.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.subject.otherHumpback whalesen_US
dc.subject.otherMegaptera novaeangliaeen_US
dc.subject.otherMigrationen_US
dc.subject.otherBehaviouren_US
dc.subject.otherCritical habitaten_US
dc.subject.otherConservationen_US
dc.titleHumpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) behaviour determines habitat use in two Australian bays.en_US
dc.typeJournal Contributionen_US
dc.bibliographicCitation.issue9en_US
dc.bibliographicCitation.titleMarine and Freshwater Researchen_US
dc.bibliographicCitation.volume72en_US
dc.description.notesChallenge, 4, 9en_US
dc.description.statusPublisheden_US
dc.format.pagerangepp. 1251-1267en_US
refterms.dateFOA2023-09-23T17:27:12Z
html.description.abstractHumpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) require a suite of essential habitats during their long migration. Therefore, the identification of critical habitats is important for continuation of their successful recovery. In this study we investigated the behaviours and habitat usage exhibited by humpback whales in two known aggregation sites on the east coast of Australia. Using a combined 5400 humpback whale records collected from Hervey Bay between 1999 and 2009 and from the Gold Coast Bay between 2011 and 2018, we analysed different types of behavioural categories. We found that humpback whales in Hervey Bay primarily exhibited surface travel and non-aggressive social behaviour, whereas both sites appeared to be similarly important for resting. Our results suggest that the Gold Coast Bay provides habitat for a wide range of critical humpback whale activities, in particular for resting mother–calf pairs, mature males seeking copulation and socialising immature whales. Hervey Bay had a higher number of mother–calf pair sightings, confirming the area as an important resting site. This study demonstrates that the two regions are critical habitats for humpback whales during their annual migration, but for different essential activities, and should be considered as a whale protection area.en_US
dc.description.refereedRefereeden_US


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