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dc.contributor.authorMeynecke, Jan-Olaf
dc.contributor.authorGustafon, Johan
dc.contributor.authorCade, David E.
dc.date.accessioned2023-09-23T19:54:21Z
dc.date.available2023-09-23T19:54:21Z
dc.date.issued2023
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.3390/jmse11030600
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1834/42791
dc.description.abstractCetaceans are known for their intelligence and display of complex behaviours including object use. For example, bowhead whales (Balaena mysticetus) are known to rub on rocks and some humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) populations undertake lateral bottom feeding. Such underwater behaviour is difficult to observe but can play a critical role in the whales’ survival and well-being. Distinguishing social behaviours from those which serve a specific function remains challenging due to a lack of direct observations and detailed descriptions of such behaviours. A CATS (Customized Animal Tracking Solutions) suction cup tag with on board video and a 3D inertial measurement unit was deployed on three different humpback whales to assess their behaviour in the Gold Coast bay, Australia. Here, we present evidence of humpback whales (tagged and untagged individuals) performing bottom contact with prolonged rolling on sandy substrate. In addition, we showed that fish were actively feeding from the whales’ skin during this behaviour. We detail the behaviour and discuss possible drivers, with a focus on cetacean innovation, possible ectoparasite removal, and habitat preferences.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://www.mdpi.com/2077-1312/11/3/600en_US
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.subject.otherTaggingen_US
dc.subject.otherBiotelemetryen_US
dc.subject.otherHumpback whalesen_US
dc.subject.otherHabitat useen_US
dc.subject.otherNovel behaviouren_US
dc.subject.otherBottom contacten_US
dc.subject.otherRollingen_US
dc.titleExfoliating Whales– Sandy Bottom Contact Behaviour of Humpback Whales.en_US
dc.typeJournal Contributionen_US
dc.bibliographicCitation.issue600en_US
dc.bibliographicCitation.titleJournal of Marine Science and Engineeringen_US
dc.bibliographicCitation.volume11en_US
dc.description.notesChallenge 4, 9en_US
dc.description.statusPublisheden_US
refterms.dateFOA2023-09-23T19:54:22Z
html.description.abstractCetaceans are known for their intelligence and display of complex behaviours including object use. For example, bowhead whales (Balaena mysticetus) are known to rub on rocks and some humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) populations undertake lateral bottom feeding. Such underwater behaviour is difficult to observe but can play a critical role in the whales’ survival and well-being. Distinguishing social behaviours from those which serve a specific function remains challenging due to a lack of direct observations and detailed descriptions of such behaviours. A CATS (Customized Animal Tracking Solutions) suction cup tag with on board video and a 3D inertial measurement unit was deployed on three different humpback whales to assess their behaviour in the Gold Coast bay, Australia. Here, we present evidence of humpback whales (tagged and untagged individuals) performing bottom contact with prolonged rolling on sandy substrate. In addition, we showed that fish were actively feeding from the whales’ skin during this behaviour. We detail the behaviour and discuss possible drivers, with a focus on cetacean innovation, possible ectoparasite removal, and habitat preferences.en_US
dc.description.refereedRefereeden_US


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