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dc.contributor.authorFavoretto, Fabio
dc.contributor.authorAburto-Oropeza, Octavio
dc.date.accessioned2024-05-01T16:06:20Z
dc.date.available2024-05-01T16:06:20Z
dc.date.issued2023
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1834/43079
dc.description.abstractHealthy oceans are essential for life, but a mere 2.9% are fully protected1. The question then arises - why is ocean protection so challenging? Among the many reasons is the economic allure of extractive activities which poses a barrier to alleviating human pressure on ocean areas. Marine protected areas (MPAs), primarily designed to preserve biodiversity, are often rationalized through a business lens and are expected to yield revenue by increasing tourists’ willingness to pay. However, MPAs are not business entities and require a set of enabling conditions to successfully reach their goals. In a successful marine protected area, a unit increase in natural capital results in a rise in tourist revenue. We developed a bioeconomic model to show how fully protecting diving sites can significantly enhance nature’s recovery and lead to larger revenues for the scuba diving industry. In Mexico, scuba diving generates as much revenue as the fishing industry, yet only 7% of the country’s diving sites are fully protected. Globally, the scuba diving industry generates up to $20 billion dollars per year, even though about half of the diving sites worldwide lack protection. Using global experiences, we designed a five-step bottom-up approach that scuba diving operators can use to amplify marine protection. This approach could catalyze the creation of stricter or new fullyprotected areas designed to incorporate existing businesses - a significant departure from the traditional business framework. The Atlas Aquatica initiative advocates for a significant shift in narrative to stimulate broader acceptance of marine protection worldwide. We aim to contribute to a sustainable blue economic growth and the 30x30 conservation target by promoting the protection of diving sites globally
dc.description.sponsorshipScripps Institution of Oceanography and Centro para la Biodiversidad Marina y la Conservación A.C.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherAtlas Aquatica Projecten_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subject.otherBlue Economyen_US
dc.subject.otherMarine ecosystemsen_US
dc.titleAtlas Aquatica: Empowering Scuba Diving Ecotourism for Marine Conservation and the Blue Economyen_US
dc.typeReporten_US
dc.contributor.corpauthorScripps Institution of Oceanography, Centro para la Biodiversidad Marina y la Conservación A.C.en_US
dc.description.statusPublisheden_US
dc.format.pages18pp.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2024-05-01T16:06:22Z
html.description.abstractHealthy oceans are essential for life, but a mere 2.9% are fully protected1. The question then arises - why is ocean protection so challenging? Among the many reasons is the economic allure of extractive activities which poses a barrier to alleviating human pressure on ocean areas. Marine protected areas (MPAs), primarily designed to preserve biodiversity, are often rationalized through a business lens and are expected to yield revenue by increasing tourists’ willingness to pay. However, MPAs are not business entities and require a set of enabling conditions to successfully reach their goals. In a successful marine protected area, a unit increase in natural capital results in a rise in tourist revenue. We developed a bioeconomic model to show how fully protecting diving sites can significantly enhance nature’s recovery and lead to larger revenues for the scuba diving industry. In Mexico, scuba diving generates as much revenue as the fishing industry, yet only 7% of the country’s diving sites are fully protected. Globally, the scuba diving industry generates up to $20 billion dollars per year, even though about half of the diving sites worldwide lack protection. Using global experiences, we designed a five-step bottom-up approach that scuba diving operators can use to amplify marine protection. This approach could catalyze the creation of stricter or new fullyprotected areas designed to incorporate existing businesses - a significant departure from the traditional business framework. The Atlas Aquatica initiative advocates for a significant shift in narrative to stimulate broader acceptance of marine protection worldwide. We aim to contribute to a sustainable blue economic growth and the 30x30 conservation target by promoting the protection of diving sites globallyen_US
dc.description.refereedNot Knownen_US


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