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dc.contributor.authorQuod, J.P.
dc.coverage.spatialWestern Indian Oceanen
dc.date.accessioned2005-07-25T13:44:23Z
dc.date.available2005-07-25T13:44:23Z
dc.date.issued1999
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1834/492
dc.description.abstractCoral reefs are vital for coastal populations and for human activities in general, as they provide people both with living resources and with "services" such as shore protection, sand accretion and coastal tourism. The coral bleaching event of 1997-1998 summer is the most geographically wide spread and severe ever recorded. In the Indian Ocean, warm waters migrated from the South to the North during the first six months. As temperature stress was extreme and/or prolonged, mortality was catastrophically high in many areas (Kenya, Comoros, Seychelles, Tanzania, Maldives), the amount of dead corals ranging from 50-90%. Therefore, ITMEMS (International Tropical Marine Ecosystems Management Symposium) held in Townsville on 24 november 1998 recommended that a multi-disciplinary taskforce immediately be set up.en
dc.format.extent141166 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen
dc.titleConsequences of the 1998 Coral Bleaching Event for the Islands of the Western Indian Oceanen
dc.typeReport
dc.description.statusPublisheden
dc.subject.asfaCoral reefsen
dc.type.refereedNon-Refereeden
refterms.dateFOA2021-01-30T18:47:48Z


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